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Green Infrared Or Didymium Ii Blue Glasses?


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I recently performed my first glaze firing this weekend and noticed that the cones were very hard to see once the kiln was at full throttle (I was not using a sitter). So much so that I over-fired all but one mug :( So, I've decided to buy some goggles/glasses to help me see inside the peep hole better, but not sure which option is best. I found some didymium blue glasses and much cheaper green infrareds, but will they both help me see what I need to see? Any thoughts?

 

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The didymium glasses will help to see the cones, but not really that much--their purpose is to block soda flare that you see in soda-lime glass melting furnaces, they wont protect your eyes from infrared.  Shade 3 welding glasses work well for looking into kilns to see cones, and should be really cheap.

I agree that green #3 is better for viewing the witness cones than didymium glasses. I found green #3 glasses at Amazon for $20.00.

 

Sincerely,Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

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One trick I learned from an old CM magazine. Get a short length of1/4 inch rubber of plastic tubing . Hold it about an inch from the inspection hole where your cones are, and blow some air through. It will cool the cones momentarily and they will be dark enough to see in front of the glare of the furnace. 

 

I got too close the first time and melted the end of the tubing. But it works and doesn't require special glasses. I don't know if this would work for a gas kiln but it works for an electric kiln.

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One trick I learned from an old CM magazine. Get a short length of1/4 inch rubber of plastic tubing . Hold it about an inch from the inspection hole where your cones are, and blow some air through. It will cool the cones momentarily and they will be dark enough to see in front of the glare of the furnace. 

 

I got too close the first time and melted the end of the tubing. But it works and doesn't require special glasses. I don't know if this would work for a gas kiln but it works for an electric kiln.

Oh my! With my clumsiness I'd probably do something dumb. Wouldn't the cold air going into the hot kiln cause some sort of temp. disturbance?

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