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Teaching Ceramics to Adults


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Welcome to the forum!

The answer to your question is something that varies from State to State. I would go to the State website to check on the possible requirements and licenses. Special need individuals have protections that are needed obviously. You could check with local special needs agencies for more help.

best,

Pres

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  • 2 years later...
On 6/11/2012 at 9:22 AM, Jessica Knapp said:

The July/August 2012 issue of Pottery Making Illustrated includes an Instructors File article by Claire O'Connor on classroom strategies that work when teaching ceramics to adult students (post college). We want to extend the conversation beyond the magazine, so, if you're a teacher who works with adults, or you're an adult who is taking ceramics classes, please share your ideas on what has worked best for you when teaching/ learning about techniques, aesthetics, and how to convey your ideas in clay by posting them in this thread.

I think a hands off attitude wirjs best when teaching adults. Observation gives insights into new skills!

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Sorry to say, but I disagree with a hands off approach to teaching adults. Firstly, one needs to determine the skill level of the adult.

If a beginner or novice to wheel throwing there are certain needs that I found very important other than the obvious hand positions and movements. There is the need to understand how much pressure is applied to the clay by either hand for centering and pulling. Interior hand and finger positions are difficult to see on smaller pieces, using a larger piece for demonstration and for hand positions lets 2-3 hands inside of the pot to help feel correct finger positions in relation to outside fingers. This also allows better understanding of the pressures needed in the beginning and end of a pull.

More advanced students often could develop poor habits in arm positions (chicken winging), and finger positions relative to inside and outside of the pot. A coaching attitude at this point allows for further development and helps to correct the poor habits. It often will mean demonstrating the correct positions, and hands on to help the student to understand why one position  is more effective than the other.

All IMHO,

best,

Pres 

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Adults, like kids, some more comfortable watching first, trying, asking questions; some want to try full on, then ask questions, start watching closer much later; some, break it down to sub-skills, focusing way in, then try putting it together, step by step, later on - so much variation.
Per my recollection!

Edited by Hulk
some->SO
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