Jump to content

Firing an acrylic painted piece


Recommended Posts

Some time ago I made a small table out of clay - it's roughly 16" high. I painted the unglazed underside and inside of the legs with acrylic paint, thinking I was finished with it. Now, I'd like to refire it to cone 5-6 (no additional glaze). Has anyone fired something with acrylic paint on it in an electric kiln? Will it ruin my kiln? (As an aside, I finally bought some Advancer shelves after saving up. Will doing this ruin the shelf?)

Edited by Kakes
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've fired things with acrylic on them before.  It's going to burn off obviously, and create some fumes.  I can't imagine it will be too bad, but I guess it depends on how much area is covered and how thickly it was painted.

I regularly fire projects stuffed with newspaper, and the smoke from that doesn't hurt the kiln, or even set off the smoke alarm that is nearby. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Waaaaay back in high school, a classmate wanted to refire a piece she'd painted with acrylic because she changed her mind and wanted to glaze it instead. Most of the paint did burn out, but there was some colour residue left in some areas. In hindsight, it was probably some form of mineral pigment being used in the paint, one that would survive ceramic temperatures. So it might depend a little on the quality of acrylic paint used in the first place.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/12/2020 at 3:01 PM, Callie Beller Diesel said:

Waaaaay back in high school, a classmate wanted to refire a piece she'd painted with acrylic because she changed her mind and wanted to glaze it instead. Most of the paint did burn out, but there was some colour residue left in some areas. In hindsight, it was probably some form of mineral pigment being used in the paint, one that would survive ceramic temperatures. So it might depend a little on the quality of acrylic paint used in the first place.

 

Yeah, I did an experiment during my student teaching, with a spare ceramic tile they had sitting around.  I painted an acrylic design on the tile, then put a clear glaze over the top.  The acrylic looked extremely aged, under the clear glaze, and you could still tell what the design was.

I will note, this was low fire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

How much residue was left in the kiln?  I was looking to clean acrylics off a piece to start over and was told it would leave a lot of residue in the kiln to be cleaned out.  I did this processes many years ago and don’t remember any residual residue in the kiln but I might be wrong and was wondering of anyone here can tell me.  Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome to the forum!

I think whoever told you that was looking to discourage you from doing it and made up a reason. While there are a few things I can think of that do leave residue in the kiln, the binders in paint aren’t among them. Unless the paint had lead content, I wouldn’t be overly worried about residue after the firing.

Making sure that the kiln is ventilated properly and not smoking you out during the firing is a bigger concern. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Callie Beller Diesel:  Thank you for the response.  This was my thought as well but I just wanted another opinion.  Also, thanks for including me in the group!  I have been doing poured ceramics off and on for over 35 years but there is still so much I don’t know  and still so much to learn! I am very glad to have found this group and forum. //CraftyLady

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.