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Hi there,

Been exploring the ceramics world for some time and i decided couple of weeks back that I must try my hand in making porcelain jewelry. So far so good :) but as you can imagine I started doing mistakes, which i believe are fine but wanted to check with the experts here if any of my work can be salvaged after firing the bisque to cone 6 ( instead of cone 06 ) app 1230 celsius degrees. 

Will this affect how the glaze will stick to the pierces? If so what options i have to make the best out of this situation? 

Also, while painting on the cone6 bisque with Amaco Velvet underglazes, i had the nasty surprise to see my colors mixing when applying the glaze by pouring the glaze on the object ( glaze which is purchased locally, no idea what components it does have yet ). Is this normal and i should stick with painting the greenware and then glazing the porcelain or is this may occur due to the very high bisque firing temperature? 

Thanks :) 

 

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Can you glaze - yes. Will it be tougher to do so, yes. Heat it prior or sticky hairspray or spray evenly  are things that have been tried with success. Will this likely look different than pieces bisque to 06, very likely yes as the glaze will not absorb into the pot prior to firing.

Underglaze - while working  on greenware is likely easier to handle and then glaze after bisque is often best and less troublesome, your errant bisque to cone six most likely made this very susceptible to re-wetting and moving about. Having said that many folks underglaze greenware, then bisque and still add more detail with underglaze then carefully glaze and fire with regular success. They do use reasonable care though knowing if I  re-wet fresh underglaze carelessly it will smear and move.

when anything is painted on a non porous surface, it takes longer to dry and is more susceptible to smearing and removal. Think of painting something on glass. The bisque cycle  among other things is designed to provide a porous more accepting surface that is sintered and not melted.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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Help Needed Please 

I would like to apply a clear glaze to greenware or wet clay.

Can someone please recommend a clear glaze made for applying to greenware or wet clay?

Any help is greatly appreciated!! Thank you so much!! 

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Intriguing...why do you want to do either of these things? More information/context would be helpful, including the type of work, the clay/glaze/temperature to be fired to etc. 

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You mean single fire. You can put glaze on greenware and fire to maturity if you want and don't need special glaze. You can't fire wet clay and can't think of any reason to try and apply glaze before the piece has dried. like leeU I would like to hear more.

Edited by Stephen

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