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TougeiBoy

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About TougeiBoy

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  • Location
    : Rural Japan

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  1. Hi from Japan. I am not sure where to post this question: I wonder if there is anyone at this site with experience using various types of manure for their firing. I am familiar with cow dung firing (recalling one memorable incident being chased by a bull while I was gathering fuel in his field... Just made it over the fence with a pile of "stuff" under my arm), but I wonder about the chemical aspects of using, say, chicken manure, etc. I see in the list above that chicken manure has a high rating regarding chemical value, so I also wonder if it is mixed with sawdust during the firing, or whether it is used by itself. Thank you for your time, and I look forward to any enlightenment you can send my way (including advice on where else I might post this query).
  2. Hi from Japan. I am not sure where to post this question: I wonder if there is anyone at this site with experience using various types of manure for their firing. I am familiar with cow dung firing (recalling one memorable incident being chased by a bull while I was gathering fuel in his field... Just made it over the fence with a pile of "stuff" under my arm), but I wonder about the chemical aspects of using, say, chicken manure, etc. Thank you for your time, and I look forward to any enlightenment you can send my way (including advice on where else I might post this query).
  3. Dear Members, I placed a short piece of pipe ring beneath the long wooden strut with the bearing sitting comfortably atop it on the floor, and the old wheel turns in a wonderful way! (Now I get to improve my skills... Must relocate Simon Leach's video channel... ; ) Sending thanks to each of you, for your kind attention, advice, and patience. Now I know exactly where to turn "the next time".
  4. Thanks, Min! I suppose I could also put a block of wood with a hole beneath the long slat, holding the bearing set up but allowing the center to turn.
  5. So... The solution to this, if I am going to retain the bearing set 'in situ', is "simply" to fit the outer part of it snuggly into the wooden hole (so that the inner pole moves, while the outer part is stabilized)... Of course, making certain the set is OFF the floor.... Does this seem accurate? Thanks again.
  6. Thanks to all of you. Looks like I have more work ahead of me... Wondering if it is worth it, but I really appreciate your taking the time to assist. Best to all of us in the coming year-- Happy New Year from Japan!
  7. Hello again from snowy northern Japan. I have managed to flip up the wheel and take a few pictures (unfortunately, they are too large for this forum, but the link is: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/lhosa8fnvy6nhy4/AAD7OzXIKogjnrQNiKdxmwnaa?dl=0. ) I can see that the bearing wheel is still there, and it turns. But I THINK there is some sort of cup missing on the bottom that would keep the axle from sitting on the ground--to enable it to float above the floor and let the bearings do their work. Apologies if I am unclear, and hope someone can help... Thank you!
  8. Dear Pres-様, Thanks so much for the additional thoughts. That behemoth is quite heavy, indeed (I am certain its weight increases with each attempt to lift it...) , and I will heed your advice. Oh how I covet those beautiful Japanese/Korean kick wheels!
  9. liambesaw -様, Thank you for your reply and thoughts. You're probably correct. Although I cannot see the underside, I can see that there is a point from the axle resting on my floor. Odd that I received it for free when at R.I.T. in the US, moved it with me here to Japan 26 years ago, and now that I am trying it for the first time since the move, it doesn't work... I guess travel does that even to the inanimate. Must get some able-bodied neighborhood boys to flip this up for me so I can take a look. Thanks again, from northern Japan.
  10. I have an elderly kick wheel: wood frame with a large-diameter concrete wheel. When I try to turn it, the entire frame travels a bit on the concrete floor and there seems to be a great deal of friction in the wheel itself--i.e. it doesn't maintain speed for long. As it's rather heavy and before trying to tip it up to examine its underside, I would like to know if the problem is most likely the axle or bearings, and maybe the axle should NOT be resting on the floor. Thank you for any good advice you can send my way!
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