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AmeriSwede

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Everything posted by AmeriSwede

  1. As an Alfred Alumni (MFA-87) but NOT from the ceramics dept., I would like to add that the some of the other areas are of equal value. My major was in 3D-Glass which I would have to add was (and still is) superlative (IMO). I felt the metals department was also very well represented, in all aspects. My own ceramic experience is all self taught, having never had a course in this medium. I sometimes wish I had the opportunity and had taken a few glaze courses with V.Cushing, during my time at Alfred (he was on sabbatical). Chris, as you finished by adding '...you can bail and go elsewhere if you hate it ... Life is one long learning curve,' ... is a very good point. I have seen some students that just didn't seem to 'fit' in at one location but seemed to thrive at another!
  2. BRAVO...... BRAVISSIMO........ All of my hats off to you Chris, for sharing that. I would love to read the book of all your rants anytime, any day, as I'm sure it must be packed with your 'shoot from the hips' style of 'truth in-your-face' facts and tidbits. Thank you for being a vital voice on this forum!
  3. Just always have this incurable impulse to share that kind of information with people in case they don;t know. Comes from teaching ceramic toxicology sections at the college level since the 80s and lots of years chairing the Health and Safety committee. I can't help it. best, ...............john And it's good advice that I agree should be said, as well.... there is no such thing as too much knowledge about the chemistry we use in our daily lives and work! And I personally look forward to reading more of your knowledgeable postings
  4. With a straight line like that.......... how can I resist? What is "rant #2"? best, ...................john Absolutely GREAT Rant(#3), Chris! Like John said .... 'Us potters are (can be) our own worst enemy' But Chris... Inquiring minds want to know.... I think you need to start another thread with your Rant #2.
  5. For me I would not let a positive indication of lead sway my decision either way. If it did test positive, I would dedicate the use of this kiln solely to the purpose of casting glass (pate de verre), slumping or fusing. But that's because I have the glass knowledge to use it. At $100, I feel the kiln is a steal!
  6. Just noticed in the pictures, that the kiln actually has a 'Dawson' Kiln Sitter/Timer.... not a 'Duncan' as you posted. Just clarification of info for others...
  7. Don't know the particulars of this kiln, but my personal opinion is that if I was given this opportunity of purchase, I would do it... as the channeled insulation refractory and stainless shell would be worth it... for me! One could always purchase a digital controller if the Duncan timer didn't work on it and of course new elements of the appropriate size can be purchased from anybody that repairs (kiln service technicians) kilns. Just my opinion... I try to personally scrounge for items like this to keep purchase prices to a minimum.
  8. http://digitalfire.com/insight/buy.php Level 1 = $59 Level 2 = $149
  9. .... and if buying more expensive equipment doesn't scare you off.... you could purchase a drill press plumbed with water, that uses hollow diamond core drills. These machines are typically made for the glass industry but can be utilized in ceramics as well. I've used up to 5" (wide) diamond holes saws that could eat through 6" solid borosilicate glass in short order... and glass, I believe is more temperamental to thermal shock than stoneware. The recirculating water keeps all dust problems at bay just as the copper tubes and the 'grinding' grit. Along the same line, but a great deal cheaper is the 'Water Swivel Adapters' that you could probably fit to a standard drill press, you would need to build a pan unit to collect the water to be recirculated or discharged. These also fit the diamond core drill bits.
  10. Thanks Denice... tile molding is one thing that I need to make lots of (initially) for this house. As much as I liked to scavange for reuseable materials back in the states I'm finding it much more difficult to do the same here in Sweden. Seems everything is recycled and the recycling centers have rules about things not leaving their facility once they're dropped off. Real shame as I see such incredible stuff (lot of it in really good condition as well). So us scavengers in this society are becoming an endangered species. ...surprisingly nothing much to do directly with the global warming... ...and thanks AndyL... I've been contemplating getting the book, but that will probably happen at a later time, though! Hey AmeriSwede I read your reply and wanted to let you know that the extruder is fantastic for making molding. Very little warping and you can press out as much as you want. I am in the middle of making a 9' by 5' talavera tile fountain and am working on a fairly complicated die for molding around the outer edge, I"m firing the spills tomorrow and have made 400 tiles that are waiting to be glazed once I complete the molding. Your right about the salvages and closeout stores, we even scour them when were on vacation in another states. My husband told me that my extruders bumper jack is wearing out so I guess will be hitting the auto salvages this weekend. Denice (Wichita, KS) Good to hear that... I have many, many border tiles to make to finish up my bathroom and kitchen and also will be making some to cover a wood 'floating floor' system near a tiled area of the entrance way and under the wood stove. I figured that it would be much faster to extrude them than to build by hand. Glad to hear that it works so well.
  11. Thanks Denice... tile molding is one thing that I need to make lots of (initially) for this house. As much as I liked to scavange for reuseable materials back in the states I'm finding it much more difficult to do the same here in Sweden. Seems everything is recycled and the recycling centers have rules about things not leaving their facility once they're dropped off. Real shame as I see such incredible stuff (lot of it in really good condition as well). So us scavengers in this society are becoming an endangered species. ...surprisingly nothing much to do directly with the global warming... ...and thanks AndyL... I've been contemplating getting the book, but that will probably happen at a later time, though!
  12. Thanks...MuddyMomma... That's looks about like the item I had envisioned. Will probably start putting it together within the next month, need to find some scrap parts that will keep the price down.
  13. I'm in the process of setting up my studio and have maintained a desire to have and use a sufficient sized extruder for years. I have leftover PVC Waste Water Pipes (110mm or about 4.4" i.d.) and end connections from remodeling the house and was curious if anybody has ever built an extruder barrel with these type of items. Any and all input on building an extruder would be greatly appreciated!
  14. Wheel Thrown and altered stoneware with engobe, tenmoku and transparent overglazes. 11cm x 11cm x 9cm

    © ©RD Laurance

  15. Wheel thrown and carved Stoneware - 'elephant skin' glaze on exterior approx. 24 cm. tall

    © ©RD Laurance

  16. Whistling pitch is made by blowing into the nose. Two finger holes located on the back of the head. Size is approximately 4.5 x 5.0 x 5.0 (cm).
  17. Unglazed stoneware with engobe. A three note whistle with hanging cord.

    © ©RD Laurance

  18. Svetlana... you posted...." Please,help me a page About me.

    with regards sv...

    What is it that you need help with?

  19. A coffee cup made for a close friend. Stoneware with engobes, glaze and gold luster.

    © ©rdlaurance

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