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      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
curt

Ian Currie Test Tiles Forums?

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I've been reading through this thread and love some of the results you're getting! I had planned on doing something similar to the mat you've developed, though more for testing colorant blends vs glaze ingredients. 

The idea of having some sort of vertical test in a grid is really intriguing.  If you had the spacing worked out correctly, using something like 12 or 24 well plates to mix glazes and dip the tiles might work. Amazon and eBay sell lots of what's meant to be disposable lab equipment that can end up being pretty cheap if you reuse. It's often used for doing medium thruput work where you're looking at a lot of variables, so perfect for this sort of application.

Also in agreement w glazenerd on some sort of g/in^2 or specific gravity surrogate.

I finally have my studio finished and kiln hooked up and excited to get started glaze testing again, though will likely be a while as we're due with our second child in a few weeks. I find the glaze testing one of the most rewarding aspects of  ceramics--so many variables in terms of clay and firing cycles alone! It definitely appeals to the former scientist in me!

 

 

 

High Bridge Pottery likes this

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On 11/26/2017 at 1:40 PM, glazenerd said:

Joseph:

if you are going to keep it as accurate as pottery studio standards allow: perhaps  apply. Glaze glaze in grams per square inch. Or some degree of recordable standard of glaze.

I was doing that before. I was putting 2ml in each cube, which I could tell you the dry amount in. I can tell you the amount of glaze per the area of the tile. But I won't continue doing that because in a potters world that really never matters. So it really isn't worth it unless I am writing lab grade scientific documentation, which I am not.

Plus once I start dipping the 2ml thing will be thrown out the window.

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On a flat tile you know how many grams will be on the tile based on how many ml you add to it right? So if your adding 2ml of glaze fluid and that contains x amount of glaze per ml then you can work out the rough math. In reality, what is the point of it because application on real pots is never done this way. It is either sprayed, dipped, or poured all of which would be absurd to try to measure. 

Edited by Joseph F

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For sprayed yes, because you could measure the amount you put into the container to spray, but then you would have to say your getting 100% onto the pot. which is unrealistic unless your holding the gun point blank. of course you could do this or atleast estimate the amount going on a pot say like 75% or something, then add that into your calculations, but its not very scientific. 

I guess you could do it for dipping as well, by weighing the container after the dip to see the amount of liquid weight removed, then see how much 1 ml weighs and do the math.

Edited by Joseph F

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Joel:

someone recently posted a gram per square inch table in one of the threads??????  I know with crystalline, I figure 0.45 per SI on tile and 0.65 grams per SI on vertical. Long while back I dipped a piece twice, two seconds each time. After it dried I did my best to scrap it off: came out to almost 0.30 grams per SI. I keep it simple 1 inch by .1 inch = SI.  Dipping is what throws me off, there is no measurable way to determine thickness, but I am the odd ball in this case.

when I am spraying pieces; I measure the height by width plus 30%. Always has gotten me close enough for crystalline work. Would be way too much for regular glazes. So my info is not going to work for 99% of the potters. For testing however, it should.

tom

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4 hours ago, High Bridge Pottery said:

That has always been my confusion, how do you work out grams per inch? @glazenerd

Hi Joel,

About 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down in this there are a few charts for determining approximate surface area. Measuring the glaze then applying a set amount to predetermined surface area to get a consistent thickness of glaze layer. When I first started spraying glazes I did this to get the feel for how much to apply. It's not something I would do on a regular basis.

Like Joseph said though, it's just not the way we work and isn't practical for doing much other than tiles.

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