Jump to content


Photo

Repairing Projects


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:47 PM

One of the joys of Ceramics, is destroying something, you just put your heart and soul in to.  It comes with the territory, but hey, odds are, it's your fault, and you know what you are doing.  Best case scenario, it's an easy fix, that won't take long.  Worst case scenario, you scrap it and start over.

 

But with teaching, neither of the above points are always true.  For one, they are students and are obviously just learning.  So they don't know how to fix broken ceramic ware.  So, in a teaching environment, it makes sense, to explain how to fix the project, and avoid a similar problem in the future.....Though usually, I explained that from the start.

But what happens, when the other point also isn't true, when a project is damage by someone, other than the owner?  Who do you have fix it?  Should the owner be required to take time out of their schedule, to fix something that shouldn't need it?  Should the guilty party do so, even the person can even be identified?  Should the teacher be responsible, since they are the expert and can probably fix it faster and more efficiently? 

 

What are your thought? 

I've done pretty much all of the above.  Normally, if someone breaks their work, have them fix it.  If I do it, then it excuses them from being haphazard with their work, and they'll do something similar again.  The big issue, is when someone else breaks a project that is not their own.  I had that happen recently.  A student threw a medium sized pot, and really had to fight it, to keep it from flopping.  They had a nice underglaze design, and it was drying on the the shelves.  I was loading greenware, and when I went to grab it, I noticed the telltale sign of "You picked up a greenware vessel incorrectly", that is the u-shaped break.  So I questioned them about it, the next day.  They swear they didn't break it.  I have no idea who did.  So I repaired it, and fairly well, if I do say so myself.

I'm sure I will always have those cases.  Unless I get cameras in my room, or someone's guilty conscience gets the best of them, I'll never know all that goes on....but as a teacher, I don't tell them that.  I AM ALL SEEING AND KNOWING, SO SPEAKETH THE ART TEACHER!!!!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#2 Norm Stuart

Norm Stuart

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 639 posts

Posted 10 February 2014 - 12:11 AM

I was loading greenware, and when I went to grab it, I noticed the telltale sign of "You picked up a greenware vessel incorrectly", that is the u-shaped break.  So I questioned them about it, the next day.  They swear they didn't break it.  I have no idea who did.

 

Most of the time all you have to do is run the fingerprints.

med_gallery_18533_680_1640426.jpg



#3 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 07:36 AM

Tough situation. I loaded and unloaded kilns for years, then put that job partly on the Ceramics 2 students. I would supervise their loading of the kiln, and often put final placing on my own head as I could pack a kiln so much tighter than they.

 

Accidental breaking is something you have to deal with in your own way. Having students repair other student work is appropriate. Not having someone come forward is unfortunate, but the person will probably use two hands the next time.

 

I hope you handle malicious vandalism with right ups and district steps.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#4 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 10 February 2014 - 05:39 PM

I was loading greenware, and when I went to grab it, I noticed the telltale sign of "You picked up a greenware vessel incorrectly", that is the u-shaped break.  So I questioned them about it, the next day.  They swear they didn't break it.  I have no idea who did.

 
Most of the time all you have to do is run the fingerprints.
med_gallery_18533_680_1640426.jpg
  

Whoa, a little CSI action!

Tough situation. I loaded and unloaded kilns for years, then put that job partly on the Ceramics 2 students. I would supervise their loading of the kiln, and often put final placing on my own head as I could pack a kiln so much tighter than they.
 
Accidental breaking is something you have to deal with in your own way. Having students repair other student work is appropriate. Not having someone come forward is unfortunate, but the person will probably use two hands the next time.
 
I hope you handle malicious vandalism with right ups and district steps.



To my knowledge Pres, nothing has been damaged or broken on purpose, at least by another student. By me, absolutely, but that's another topic.....

Students seem to think that others are out to get them, via their Art classes: "Someone took my clay!","Someone uncovered my project" , "Someone took my project.". My responses usually are, "Did you put your name on your bag of clay and put it on YOUR shelf? ", "Are you sure you remembered to cover your project well in the first place?", "Did you put your name on your project that looked similar to several other student's?"

I reassured them, that even their mortal enemies aren't so devious to come in the Art Room and mess with their stuff.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#5 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 990 posts

Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:00 PM

Benzine here's a recipe for mending, doesn't work on the minds of adolescents.

 

 

SPOOZE (FASTENER & FIXER)

1/3 part DRY clay body you are using
1/3 part corn syrup. brown or clear..no matter
1/3 part vinegar
a drop of peroxide to keep the whole mess from going stinky and fermenting.
PEGGY HEER

That's what I add paper to, blended it's smooth.



#6 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 10:32 PM

Benzine here's a recipe for mending, doesn't work on the minds of adolescents.

 

 

SPOOZE (FASTENER & FIXER)

1/3 part DRY clay body you are using
1/3 part corn syrup. brown or clear..no matter
1/3 part vinegar
a drop of peroxide to keep the whole mess from going stinky and fermenting.
PEGGY HEER

That's what I add paper to, blended it's smooth.

Good time for that stick blender! -_-


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#7 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 10 February 2014 - 11:45 PM

Benzine here's a recipe for mending, doesn't work on the minds of adolescents.
 
 
SPOOZE (FASTENER & FIXER)
1/3 part DRY clay body you are using
1/3 part corn syrup. brown or clear..no matter
1/3 part vinegar
a drop of peroxide to keep the whole mess from going stinky and fermenting.
PEGGY HEER

That's what I add paper to, blended it's smooth.

Good time for that stick blender! -_-

I only have to '70s style stand blenders in my classroom. If you guessed, that they are an ugly neutral color, you're right.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#8 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 990 posts

Posted 11 February 2014 - 07:58 PM

 

 

Benzine here's a recipe for mending, doesn't work on the minds of adolescents.
 
 
SPOOZE (FASTENER & FIXER)
1/3 part DRY clay body you are using
1/3 part corn syrup. brown or clear..no matter
1/3 part vinegar
a drop of peroxide to keep the whole mess from going stinky and fermenting.
PEGGY HEER

That's what I add paper to, blended it's smooth.

Good time for that stick blender! -_-

I only have to '70s style stand blenders in my classroom. If you guessed, that they are an ugly neutral color, you're right.

 

Sounds like they last better than today's models, did a relatively new one in when making tomato sauce.. Take care of them! Those ones you write about were great for whipping up all sorts when making paper from natural fibres, remember  the focus on lid fastening when teaching that one!



#9 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:24 PM

 

 

 

Benzine here's a recipe for mending, doesn't work on the minds of adolescents.
 
 
SPOOZE (FASTENER & FIXER)
1/3 part DRY clay body you are using
1/3 part corn syrup. brown or clear..no matter
1/3 part vinegar
a drop of peroxide to keep the whole mess from going stinky and fermenting.
PEGGY HEER

That's what I add paper to, blended it's smooth.

Good time for that stick blender! -_-

I only have to '70s style stand blenders in my classroom. If you guessed, that they are an ugly neutral color, you're right.

 

Sounds like they last better than today's models, did a relatively new one in when making tomato sauce.. Take care of them! Those ones you write about were great for whipping up all sorts when making paper from natural fibres, remember  the focus on lid fastening when teaching that one!

 

I think the blenders I have, were used to make paper pulp.  One of the previous teachers, did a lot of paper/ book making.  It's not my thing, so I beat them up more, with bone dry clay pulverization and glaze mixing.

 

The big issue I've noticed with mixers of this type, is that they eventually turn themselves, and the removable bottom, starts to loosen from the glass pitcher.  If you don't watch it, and regularly tighten it, you can get a mess.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#10 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,590 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:25 PM

Also Babs, thanks for the mender recipe.  My college instructor used something similar, with the bone dry clay and corn syrup.  I'll give this one a shot.  Does it work on bone dry pieces?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#11 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 990 posts

Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:52 PM

Also Babs, thanks for the mender recipe.  My college instructor used something similar, with the bone dry clay and corn syrup.  I'll give this one a shot.  Does it work on bone dry pieces?

Not sure on that as I've moved away from students and am harsher on my stuff than theirs ie back in the bucket for the faulty stuff now.  If you're going to make it up for the wetter  ware, give a dry piece a go and see. Know you don't have time but the damp box overnight, or depending on how forgiving the clay is, damp paper towel on the broken parts.

Hard task getting students not to lift stuff other than their own, I guess we make most pots to be touched!

Handles I swear have human magnets on them, I would be rich if I had a dollar for everytime a st. has picked up a green piece by the handle....



#12 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 990 posts

Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:42 AM

Also Babs, thanks for the mender recipe.  My college instructor used something similar, with the bone dry clay and corn syrup.  I'll give this one a shot.  Does it work on bone dry pieces?

Benzine just googled it and it is stated for medium to bone dry ware!

Marcia who contributes greatly to this site says she adds 20% paper pulp to this mix.. I read that in a thread from my google search. was a posting about P.H .spooze in a forum of CAD 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users