Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bciskepottery

Ten Lessons From A Maker

Recommended Posts

bciskepottery    925

I posted this yesterday in another thread, but thought it might be able to stand on its own. Tony Clennell posted this link on his blog -- 10 lessons from a maker; worth reading. I'm a bit partial to VI) The more you work in the future, the less competition you will have. But all 10 lessons are spot on.

 

http://theholbornmag.com/2013/04/24/ten-lessons-from-a-maker-by-david-hieatt-hiut-denim-co/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GEP    863

Try this link:

http://theholbornmag.com/2013/04/24/ten-lessons-from-a-maker-by-david-hieatt-hiut-denim-co/

 

 

My favorite part of the article:

 

"And it’s going to take some old fashioned hard work. Those who want short cuts, who want to be overnight success are going to be in for a bit of disappointment. There is no substitute for the hard work you will have to put in. Doing the work is rights of passage."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBaymore    1,432

Try this link:

http://theholbornmag.com/2013/04/24/ten-lessons-from-a-maker-by-david-hieatt-hiut-denim-co/

 

 

My favorite part of the article:

 

"And it’s going to take some old fashioned hard work. Those who want short cuts, who want to be overnight success are going to be in for a bit of disappointment. There is no substitute for the hard work you will have to put in. Doing the work is rights of passage."

 

 

Amen!

 

best,

 

..........................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Norm Stuart    80

I think this is the more important message for ceramicists hoping to sell their work.

 

Quality is what we make.  .   .   .  But it is not how we will sell our jeans. People have desires and dreams and you have to learn how to make your product fit into them.

 

People buy a lifestyle, an image, a purpose, a superiority, part of a small elite club, rejection of the norm. Part of your job will be to understand their desires, and make sure what you make appeals to them.

 

Your customers go to bed each night and dream their dreams. They dream about changing the world, they dream about starting an amazing company, they dream about all sorts of crazy stuff. But they rarely dream about quality.   (nor are they likely to dream of denim or ceramics)

 

Don’t ever compromise on quality. But sell the dream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×