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Getting A Kiln Delivered


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#21 StaceyB2

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:17 PM

Diane, I agree with you.  It's not a perfect option and why I didn't jump on it to start.  For whatever reason, their used kilns seem more reasonably priced.  At many other places L&Ls are on sale now + have "free" vents with kit purchase and I wonder if this is something I should jump on (although I don't know maybe these sales are normally on all the time ).  A 23s would be 2,100 delivered.  It would take me a year or two to pay of the kiln and I *hope* I would be able to sell a few pots to help offset it. The digital would be great as I have small kids and would have to fire a manual at night in order to give it the proper amount of babysitting. 



#22 neilestrick

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 05:36 PM

L&L has been doing the free vent promotion every Fall for the last few years. Sometimes they extend it beyond the new year. You can get that from any L&L distributor.

 

One thing to think about: getting another kiln in the future may require additional wiring costs. Unless you get a new kiln later that uses the same amperage, like a kiln of the same size, you'll have to upgrade the wiring and fuse to accommodate it. So your new kiln later may cost even more if you go with a larger one. If you do go that route, make sure your electrician uses conduit that is large enough that it can be used when you upgrade the wiring in the future. It'll save you a lot of money.


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#23 Diane Puckett

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 07:01 PM

Remember that, if you order from out-of-state, you may not have to pay sales tax, so closer is not always cheaper.
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#24 StaceyB2

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 08:37 PM

The sales tax thing occurred to me in my conversation with Bailey.    I am planning on having them put in 6 gauge copper wire and a 60amp circuit and running extra power out (to the garage studio) for future growth.  I just had an electrician in am still waiting on that estimate.  I have no idea what it should cost (garage about 25 feet from house) so I'm nervous about that.  Thankfully, we already had decent service coming into the house. 



#25 oldlady

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 09:23 PM

this brings up a whole new subject.  do you see yourself as a business or not?  if you do, there is another path to check.  sometimes it is possible to get a second meter installed for a business.  there are reasons why this might be a good thing to do.  the power company has a person who can help you decide if this is a reasonable option for you. service lines from the house to the garage could cost you a lot. now and reduce the options you will have when you need something installed in the house itself.

 

having a meter installed by the power company on the garage means that you would only pay for the service line from there to the kiln.  keeping the business costs separate from your house  has tax implications that need investigating and this may be the best time to do it.  yes, the rates for a business are different from the residential rates you now pay. 

 

many houses have only 200 amp service for the entire building.  if you have a separate 200 amps for the studio, (business) you will be able to add things requiring power in both buildings,  AC and heat in  the garage/studio at some point for example. if you have an older house, you may not even have 200 amps now.


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#26 neilestrick

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 09:26 PM

What it 'should' cost will vary greatly depending on the situation and the electrician. I know people who have had kilns wired up for $300, and others who spent $1500. Just get several quotes.


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#27 StaceyB2

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:52 PM

You are right, getting service to the garage totally a whole new subject that I didn't think of. I would like to have a business...but at this point I have some cobwebs to dust off.  I live in an old house that was updated to 150amps but we have gas everything and no central air/no future possibility of central air.



#28 Isculpt

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 02:14 AM

Let me reiterate and emphasize what others have said : Find out EXACTLY what is included in the purchase price in terms of delivery and set up.  A friend ordered a kiln and was shocked that there was no liftgate to lower the kiln to the ground.  Further, the truck driver refused to lift a finger (insurance restrictions, he said) to help my 4'11" friend.  She had to build a ramp out of boards she had in her yard and then get the kiln down the ramp by herself, then move it 40 feet to her studio.  I don't know where you live, but I just ordered an Olympic from Carolina Clay Connection in Charlotte NC, and for a $150 charge, CCC will deliver the kiln in a small truck (very important if you have a long, twisty driveway like mine), unload it, set it up, and hook it up to the electrical box.  I consider that $150 well spent.  Check and see if you can get similar service. 



#29 neilestrick

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:27 AM

Truck drivers are truck drivers. They are hired to drive the truck. They do not touch the load unless you have ordered that service and they are trained to do it. The vast majority of the freight in this country is delivered to companies with loading docks and fork lifts. Lift gate service is an unusual situation.

 

Receiving freight is very different than UPS or FedEx. Whomever your friend ordered the kiln from should have asked if she needed a lift gate. This is also one of the many problems with ordering a kiln via the internet. A lot of information needs to be discussed with the customer before delivering a kiln. People often order the wrong voltage, wrong phase, wrong delivery service, etc, when they don't speak with a knowledgable seller.


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#30 timbo_heff

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:48 AM

Again: call Sheffield: We have out own truck and offer inside delivery: our driver has set up 100's of kilns !

It is cheaper if you and hubby can be his assistant in carrying the rings separately if needed.

 

The driver (with your help)  brings it in, assembles where you want it, attaches the vent if needed, reassembles the control box if it had to come off to get it in, and gets rid of the packing materials if you don't want them.

Usually just adds $100 to the delivery cost.

 

It's a great way to go rather than be scratching your head, looking at your new kiln getting rained on in your driveway wondering how are we going to get the thing in.



#31 Mart

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 02:16 PM

Hire a furniture mover. Our studio is on the 4th floor and there is no lift in this building :)
2 guys showed up, picked up the kiln like it was nothing and few minutes later I opened a studio door for them. Done!

#32 neilestrick

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 02:31 PM

Hire a furniture mover. Our studio is on the 4th floor and there is no lift in this building :)
2 guys showed up, picked up the kiln like it was nothing and few minutes later I opened a studio door for them. Done!

 

I've got to disagree with you a little on this. More than any other cause, I see serious damage to kilns done by people moving them who don't know how to move them properly- movers, janitors, maintenance guys, electricians, etc. People who don't work with kilns do not realize how fragile the bricks are. All it takes to break some bricks is to set it down crooked/uneven. The only way you should let a mover handle the kiln is if you can supervise the moving and make sure they understand the fragility of the bricks.

 

Sectional kilns should never be moved while assembled. They are designed to be moved in sections. I would never trust the handles to hold the weight of the entire kiln. If the handle gives way-CRASH!


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#33 oldlady

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 02:45 PM

can attest to this, neil.  during construction of my dream house, my kiln was outdoors, covered and safe until one of the guys running the backhoe thought he would help me out by putting it inside the garage for me.  this was after i had threatened anyone who touched it with instant death.  he knew the machine could lift it!


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#34 Mart

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 03:17 PM

Dude, lets dial down on FUD, thank you :) Those guys move pianos and furniture, that cost way more than this kiln. All you have to do is tell them what is going on and let them do their job. Kiln was on the pallet and nothing happened to it. It was never even tilted. Sure, you can invite your friends, who are probably way more clueless, when it come to moving heavy fragile stuff (0 experience, no proper tools etc etc etc).




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