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What Every Potter Needs!


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#21 Benzine

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 10:14 AM



I'm straight out of the sixties and never threw in a dress.

Oh, I never meant to imply that many, or any, potters during the 60's would throw in a dress! I thought though, that the style of dress and her hair, etc., was sort of 60's looking. And to me, the dress was a give-away that maybe she wasn't a real potter, but just posing. I also noticed none of the other people in the photo were using this gizmo! As for people like Bernard Leach, I have no doubt there have been some potters who dressed quite well while throwing. I know a woman who would wear long sleeves buttoned down while teaching a throwing class and manage to get nothing on them! That just isn't me, or most of us, I'd imagine!


Two very famous and much-loved potters, Nan and Jim McKinnell, were always well-dressed for the pottery classes they taught. Nan used silk handkerchiefs to wipe the clay off her fingers and Jim always wore a bow tie.

Jim


My Ceramics instructor in college, wore nice shoes, khaki pants, and a button up or polo shirt every day. He threw so fast, and with a minimal amount of water, he never got anything on him. Even with all the demos, and his own bit of work, that he would do, during the class, I never saw that he got anything on him, clay, glaze, etc.

In regards to the posted picture, that looks like something you'd use, if the clay body contained ground uranium......Hey, glow in the dark pots!!!
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#22 annekat

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 08:19 PM

The Captain Ceramics video was quite funny. More of a 70's time frame than 60's, it turns out. I thought the Glazing Grippers, or whatever they called them, looked like they might actually work!
Anne

#23 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 10:51 AM

The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#24 Benzine

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 11:54 AM

The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#25 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:13 PM


The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.


Good thing the skirt incident happened in my basement, it nearly unclothed me!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#26 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:13 PM


The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.


Good thing the skirt incident happened in my basement, it nearly unclothed me!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#27 OffCenter

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:20 PM



The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


I always tell my students, to watch out for loose items, while on the kick wheels; shoe laces, long belts, etc. Luckily, the only things I've had happen are when an apron, draped across the lap, was pulled off, not to mention the contless flip flops that get pull/ launched off the students' feet.


Good thing the skirt incident happened in my basement, it nearly unclothed me!


Please post pictures.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#28 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:22 PM

I should have taken a picture of the twisted slip laden skirt.... my 12 yr old daughter happened to be in the room and could not stop laughing at me!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#29 Diane Puckett

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:21 PM

The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!

Too funny!
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#30 OffCenter

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:06 AM

The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


The link not working is my fault. I can't post a picture in the post. I don't know why but I gave up trying and now just post to my profile gallery and link to it in the post. I took that pic down so I could use another pic in a different post. BTW, why did someone give you a minus for that post? I cancelled it with a plus. There are some really creepy lurkers around here. This is the only forum I know of that allows +/- ratings anonymously. It would be a great improvement to this forum to change that.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#31 OffCenter

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:11 AM


The link isn't working for me so I feel like I am missing out. But i must say that I made the mistake once by throwing in a long skirt. (it wasn't a formal skirt, just like a long hippy skirt) It got all twisted in my kick wheel and in struggling to get it unwrapped I flopped the bowl I was working on. LMAO!!! Never again!!!


The link not working is my fault. I can't post a picture in the post. I don't know why but I gave up trying and now just post to my profile gallery and link to it in the post. I took that pic down so I could use another pic in a different post. BTW, why did someone give you a minus for that post? I cancelled it with a plus. There are some really creepy lurkers around here. This is the only forum I know of that allows +/- ratings anonymously. It would be a great improvement to this forum to change that.

Jim


CRAP! I clicked the minus button instead of the plus and I can't change it. All I can do is apologize.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#32 JBaymore

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 10:03 AM

CRAP! I clicked the minus button instead of the plus and I can't change it. All I can do is apologize.



Jim... I just +1 ed it myself. I can't see any reason anyone would -1 that posting either. It still sita at a -1. I'll go see if with my Mod tools I have the option to "neutralize" it.

best,

.......................john



EDIT: No joy... I can't find a tool that lets me set the posting back to "zero". Sorry.
John Baymore
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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#33 OffCenter

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 10:39 AM


CRAP! I clicked the minus button instead of the plus and I can't change it. All I can do is apologize.



Jim... I just +1 ed it myself. I can't see any reason anyone would -1 that posting either. It still sita at a -1. I'll go see if with my Mod tools I have the option to "neutralize" it.

best,

.......................john



EDIT: No joy... I can't find a tool that lets me set the posting back to "zero". Sorry.


Well, at least you neutralized my mistake. Thanks.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#34 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 11:06 AM

Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#35 Pres

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 11:15 AM

Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...


This has become so funny, yet at the same time all of us need to realize the dangers of moving machinery. I like benzine used to caution the students of long-sleeves, hair, necklaces, lanyards, ties and other things. I have been conked nearly unconscious when a tie caught in the wheel. Being aware of body parts and such is important also. Students have smashed fingers when working together by having the finger in the way of a plunger in an extruder, or getting the pointer thumb web caught in the clevis. Even though I have lecherously funny visions of you and your dress, with your daughter running around laughing, a little caution. . . be careful.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#36 Benzine

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 12:37 PM


Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...


This has become so funny, yet at the same time all of us need to realize the dangers of moving machinery. I like benzine used to caution the students of long-sleeves, hair, necklaces, lanyards, ties and other things. I have been conked nearly unconscious when a tie caught in the wheel. Being aware of body parts and such is important also. Students have smashed fingers when working together by having the finger in the way of a plunger in an extruder, or getting the pointer thumb web caught in the clevis. Even though I have lecherously funny visions of you and your dress, with your daughter running around laughing, a little caution. . . be careful.


How did someone, get their finger in the way of the plunger?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#37 Pres

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:26 PM



Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...


This has become so funny, yet at the same time all of us need to realize the dangers of moving machinery. I like benzine used to caution the students of long-sleeves, hair, necklaces, lanyards, ties and other things. I have been conked nearly unconscious when a tie caught in the wheel. Being aware of body parts and such is important also. Students have smashed fingers when working together by having the finger in the way of a plunger in an extruder, or getting the pointer thumb web caught in the clevis. Even though I have lecherously funny visions of you and your dress, with your daughter running around laughing, a little caution. . . be careful.


How did someone, get their finger in the way of the plunger?


I required that everyone work as a pair on the extruder. On the Bailey's they would take so much clay for the hollow form, some kids couldn't wedge it all. Two worked better. Any way two girls working together, another girl back with them, all talking. One puts clay into the extruder barrel over her head, rests her hand there, other girl talking to the two, puts the the plunger down to go in the barrel, not thinking starts to move clevis down, pinching the other girls fingers between the barrel and the plunger. Bruised, not broken, ripped finger nail, I sent her to the nurse for antiseptic and a band aid. Good class lesson that day, but had the teacher in a sweat.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#38 Benzine

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:40 PM




Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...


This has become so funny, yet at the same time all of us need to realize the dangers of moving machinery. I like benzine used to caution the students of long-sleeves, hair, necklaces, lanyards, ties and other things. I have been conked nearly unconscious when a tie caught in the wheel. Being aware of body parts and such is important also. Students have smashed fingers when working together by having the finger in the way of a plunger in an extruder, or getting the pointer thumb web caught in the clevis. Even though I have lecherously funny visions of you and your dress, with your daughter running around laughing, a little caution. . . be careful.


How did someone, get their finger in the way of the plunger?


I required that everyone work as a pair on the extruder. On the Bailey's they would take so much clay for the hollow form, some kids couldn't wedge it all. Two worked better. Any way two girls working together, another girl back with them, all talking. One puts clay into the extruder barrel over her head, rests her hand there, other girl talking to the two, puts the the plunger down to go in the barrel, not thinking starts to move clevis down, pinching the other girls fingers between the barrel and the plunger. Bruised, not broken, ripped finger nail, I sent her to the nurse for antiseptic and a band aid. Good class lesson that day, but had the teacher in a sweat.


Wow! I've honestly never had that happen, but I've got a few less years into education, than you do. I did have one of my students, rip the extruder off the wall though. It was secured into the concrete blocks, with two or three six inch bolts, but apparently years of students, putting way too much force on the handle, finally took their toll. That student felt pretty strong, to be sure. From then on, I really emphasized, that when I said "Soft clay only for the extruder", I meant it.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#39 Pres

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:54 PM





Awe- I feel so taken care of!

Posted Image

Pissing people off doesn't bother me- I supposed it's better than having no recognition at all...


This has become so funny, yet at the same time all of us need to realize the dangers of moving machinery. I like benzine used to caution the students of long-sleeves, hair, necklaces, lanyards, ties and other things. I have been conked nearly unconscious when a tie caught in the wheel. Being aware of body parts and such is important also. Students have smashed fingers when working together by having the finger in the way of a plunger in an extruder, or getting the pointer thumb web caught in the clevis. Even though I have lecherously funny visions of you and your dress, with your daughter running around laughing, a little caution. . . be careful.


How did someone, get their finger in the way of the plunger?


I required that everyone work as a pair on the extruder. On the Bailey's they would take so much clay for the hollow form, some kids couldn't wedge it all. Two worked better. Any way two girls working together, another girl back with them, all talking. One puts clay into the extruder barrel over her head, rests her hand there, other girl talking to the two, puts the the plunger down to go in the barrel, not thinking starts to move clevis down, pinching the other girls fingers between the barrel and the plunger. Bruised, not broken, ripped finger nail, I sent her to the nurse for antiseptic and a band aid. Good class lesson that day, but had the teacher in a sweat.


Wow! I've honestly never had that happen, but I've got a few less years into education, than you do. I did have one of my students, rip the extruder off the wall though. It was secured into the concrete blocks, with two or three six inch bolts, but apparently years of students, putting way too much force on the handle, finally took their toll. That student felt pretty strong, to be sure. From then on, I really emphasized, that when I said "Soft clay only for the extruder", I meant it.


I kept a bent aluminum Bailey die to show them what would happen to the extruder with too stiff of clay. At the same time, my first Bailey was illegal in a way. It was mounted on the portable stand that was meant for the pneumatic devices. It worked fine, could be moved out of the way, and never fell over on anyone. Second Bailey I got though was wall mounted and lower so that shorter people like the girls could reach it.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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