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celia12345678910

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I finally have a little time to read the posts in the communities, and I love that there are so many talented people in the group. I notice that when I view profiles it helps to visualize and TRY to solve problems if I can get an idea of what the final products you make look like. Please take advantage of the gallery benefits of your Ceramics Arts Daily accounts. This would be of good use for people that don't have web pages, and at least Ceramics Arts Daily participants can view your work. Never know, might work like free advertising!OH! I FORGOT! Please let me know when your update your gallery!

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I finally have a little time to read the posts in the communities, and I love that there are so many talented people in the group. I notice that when I view profiles it helps to visualize and TRY to solve problems if I can get an idea of what the final products you make look like. Please take advantage of the gallery benefits of your Ceramics Arts Daily accounts. This would be of good use for people that don't have web pages, and at least Ceramics Arts Daily participants can view your work. Never know, might work like free advertising!OH! I FORGOT! Please let me know when your update your gallery!

 

 

Nice piece in you profile gallery. I'd like to know more about it.

 

Jim

Idaho Potter likes this

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I finally have a little time to read the posts in the communities, and I love that there are so many talented people in the group. I notice that when I view profiles it helps to visualize and TRY to solve problems if I can get an idea of what the final products you make look like. Please take advantage of the gallery benefits of your Ceramics Arts Daily accounts. This would be of good use for people that don't have web pages, and at least Ceramics Arts Daily participants can view your work. Never know, might work like free advertising!OH! I FORGOT! Please let me know when your update your gallery!

 

 

Nice piece in you profile gallery. I'd like to know more about it.

 

Jim

 

 

Thank you Jim for asking, the piece in my gallery is about 9 inches wide and high. The vessel is wheel thrown, terra sig applied to bone dry greenware, burnished, bisqued, ferric chloride on the surface and baked potatoe Raku. The lid is wheel thrown with handbuilt, naked clay attachment, horse hair marks. I have been to several workshops presented by notable Naked Raku and Raku artists. Clay is my therapy and passion.

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Really nice work Celia... I've never really dabbled in naked raku, but love the effect. And yes- I need to post more images.

 

I worked in the BWCA for eight years as a guide and miss Northern Minnesota badly. Very envious that you get to hang you hat in that region!

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You are right, one should post more pics in the gallery. Will do so when I'am back home, next week. May I ask you what's baked potatoe raku? Sounds interesting. Thanks

 

Evelyne

 

Thanks for your interest Evelyn. Baked Potatoe Raku is a form of Naked Raku (no glaze on the pots). It is similar to Saggar firing, but the saggar is aluminum foil wraped around pottery (hence baked potatoe) that has been painted with a very cautic acid, ferric chloride. (used as an etchant for pc boards). You can add combustibles also (like saggar firing techniques) that leave marks on your pots. For lots more information and many galleries of work by other artists check out the group Naked Raku in Yahoo groups.

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You are right, one should post more pics in the gallery. Will do so when I'am back home, next week. May I ask you what's baked potatoe raku? Sounds interesting. Thanks

 

Evelyne

 

Thanks for your interest Evelyn. Baked Potatoe Raku is a form of Naked Raku (no glaze on the pots). It is similar to Saggar firing, but the saggar is aluminum foil wraped around pottery (hence baked potatoe) that has been painted with a very cautic acid, ferric chloride. (used as an etchant for pc boards). You can add combustibles also (like saggar firing techniques) that leave marks on your pots. For lots more information and many galleries of work by other artists check out the group Naked Raku in Yahoo groups.

 

 

Just for pedantry, ferric is actually a corrosive salt.

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