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Steven Hill's Firing Schedule For Bisque?


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#21 OffCenter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:34 PM

The Hannah's Fake Ash recipe that is on the CD is goofy. I don't believe the silica 22.7 should be in there. Original HFA had slightly more redart and no 3195, I can understand those modifications but not the addition of silica.


Min


Yes, that is the one that is incorrect. There may be another. I'm sorry but I can't find the disc or the pdf so can't be more helpful right now.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#22 OffCenter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:43 PM

Jim,
Please mention the qualities you find in Opulence Clear 125 that you are fond of.
I've found most formulas of ^6 clear produce far too much gloss to the point of distraction.
John255


I don't think you would like it, then, because that is one of the good points for me. I like a clear on very translucent porcelain to be very glossy. It is glossy. Very clear. Very forgiving in application in that it works thick or thin and drips disappear. I fire it to cone 6-7 but it looks the same at 5 and I think below and I've actually put a test in an anagama that got up to cone 13 and I couldn't believe that it worked there, too. (I have to re-test that because I still can't believe it didn't burn off.) Doesn't hardpan badly. Is delicious in vodka.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#23 John255

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:59 PM

Jim,
It is because of your interesting conversation with Min that I'm using my own colorants.
Wow, for 125 having the widest range I've ever heard of, but it dosen't exceed the range of your drink additive.
I've heard kaolin in 7UP is excellent when you can't get to a bathroom after eating Mexican.
I had no idea this morning after putting on my socks I would learn any of this.
Thanks to all.
John255
John255

#24 Min

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:22 PM

If you need a low expansion clear gloss that doesn't show drips, craze or hardpan and is okay @ ^5 through 7:

G1215U

Silica - 26

EPK - 14

Wollastonite - 14.5

3249 - 20

Minspar - 24

total: 98.5

If you need to raise the expansion add nepsy, I have added up to 8% with no discernable difference in the glaze. Subbing out magnesium carb in the formula results in bubbles in the glaze, the 3249 is necessary.

Min

#25 Pugaboo

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 10:03 PM

Thank you off center I am now the proud owner of my very first glaze notebook with the watercolor green glaze recipe and notes written in it. I might never get brave enough to use it but its there and who knows what the future will bring. I even made note about what you said its properties are and that you like to use it with opulence clear. This is so cool!

I'd actually gone by your gallery a little bit earlier today and seen your pieces and was astounded at the colors. The green swirled colors blend so well with your shapes on the cups its perfect symmetry I can't even picture them with a different glaze they look like they should be those colors. I actually saw my first piece of bisque fired lizella clay the other day when I was watching my teacher unload the studio kiln. I must say your piece is worlds away and you really utilize the red of the clay well with the other colors of the cup and holder. I especially like the pieces you showed there as well as here with the white and blue and thought wow I wonder how he did that and I doubt I'll ever get that perfect with my colors. Thank you so much for sharing your work and insight.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#26 Biglou13

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 06:48 PM

Jim (0ffcenter)
I gotta say I'm surprised, your a Steven hill fan.......the mug is cool, but those bottles, your online presence.....I thought would be diametrically opposed to his style / thought process. .I would have never guessed. Even more surpised that your more than familiar in his ways.

Nor would I expect a Steven hill fan boy/girl to make bottles like yours...

I like his work alot, Just not my steeze (style)...
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#27 John255

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:01 PM

Jim (Offcenter)
Thanks for offering any missing SH formulas.
Do you (or anyone) have Bailey's Red?
Thanks,
John255
John255

#28 Min

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:39 PM

Bailey's Red:

Custer - 46.6

EPK - 4

Bentonite - 2

Bone Ash - 15

Lithium Carb - 4

Talc - 16.9

Silica - 11.5

Red Iron Oxide - 11.5

Different iron oxides produce different results, I have had the best luck with high purity ones. Crocus Martis is good to try also. Slow cooling a must.

Another good iron red is Bill Van Gilders, recipe on his website.

Min

#29 John255

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

Thanks Min,
You are always right in there!
Just got in some Spanish Red Iron.
I've been to Spain four times and didn't see a spot of Spanish red.
Hard to believe we can lust after rust the way we do.
John255
John255

#30 OffCenter

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:14 AM

Thank you off center I am now the proud owner of my very first glaze notebook with the watercolor green glaze recipe and notes written in it. I might never get brave enough to use it but its there and who knows what the future will bring. I even made note about what you said its properties are and that you like to use it with opulence clear. This is so cool!

I'd actually gone by your gallery a little bit earlier today and seen your pieces and was astounded at the colors. The green swirled colors blend so well with your shapes on the cups its perfect symmetry I can't even picture them with a different glaze they look like they should be those colors. I actually saw my first piece of bisque fired lizella clay the other day when I was watching my teacher unload the studio kiln. I must say your piece is worlds away and you really utilize the red of the clay well with the other colors of the cup and holder. I especially like the pieces you showed there as well as here with the white and blue and thought wow I wonder how he did that and I doubt I'll ever get that perfect with my colors. Thank you so much for sharing your work and insight.

Terry


Thanks for the critique! I noticed in another thread that you're buying a kiln. Looks like you're getting all set up in your studio. When you're ready to start mixing your own glazes I think you'll like that a lot better than depending on commercial glazes. Glazing isn't just the last thing you do to a pot, it is an art in itself and well worth the learning curve. Setting up a glaze lab isn't nearly as daunting at it must seem to someone just starting out. A half pound or so of 6 or 8 of the coloring and opacifying chems and 20 lbs or so of the 8 or 10 clays and fluxes, a good scale and you're ready to go. This is in a thread about Steven Hill's techniques. When you're ready to start studying glazes I highly recommend that you buy "The Surface Techniques of Steven Hill".

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#31 OffCenter

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:34 AM

Jim (0ffcenter)
I gotta say I'm surprised, your a Steven hill fan.......the mug is cool, but those bottles, your online presence.....I thought would be diametrically opposed to his style / thought process. .I would have never guessed. Even more surpised that your more than familiar in his ways.

Nor would I expect a Steven hill fan boy/girl to make bottles like yours...

I like his work alot, Just not my steeze (style)...


When I started potting again (after taking a little 35-year break) everything was new to me again. The famous potters of my student and early potting days were all dead and things had changed. The first new to me potter whose pots blew me away was Stephen Hill. But what really impressed me was that this guy who was a student when I was and had come up in the tradition that all serious pottery was cone 10 reduction and spent his entire career making incredibly beautiful cone 10 reduction pottery, could suddenly stop and turn on a dime and reject all that and say, "Hey, I can do even better work firing in this humble cone 6 electric kiln." And, he's right. Putting a computer on the elec kiln changed everything. I've said in some other thread that the elec kiln is for this decade what cone 10 reduction was for the '70's, salt was for the '80's, and wood for the '90's. I love what you can do in an elec kiln, including doing sagger firings that are better than anything you can do in any other kind of kiln.

But, starting over makes me a student again and like most students, I haven't settled on one kind of pottery that I concentrate on. I love wood firing and every time the owner of middle Georgia's only anagama says it's time to start splitting wood I'm ready.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#32 OffCenter

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:45 AM

Jim (Offcenter)
Thanks for offering any missing SH formulas.
Do you (or anyone) have Bailey's Red?
Thanks,
John255


I see that Min has already posted it. Good info, too. I haven't had much luck with high purity RIO. The glazes I've tested it in speckle. I like subing Spanish RIO in a lot of saturated iron glazes and have had good results Crocus.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#33 John255

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 09:33 AM

Thank you all for responding to Bailey Red.
I've noticed several, or maybe most, formulas for iron reds contain Bone Ash.
The suppliers have two forms Di-Calcium, and Tri-Calcium.
The Tri version is three times the price.
The cheaper version is made of ground animal bones.
A search did not turn up any information about which is best.
Seems there was a lot of discussion couple years back even to extent of using human bones.
One woman said she was going to make a glaze with her husbands bones.
Hope she can wait.
Anyone have any preference on which bone to pick?
Thanks.
John255



John255

#34 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 10:53 AM

Thank you all for responding to Bailey Red.
I've noticed several, or maybe most, formulas for iron reds contain Bone Ash.
The suppliers have two forms Di-Calcium, and Tri-Calcium.
The Tri version is three times the price.
The cheaper version is made of ground animal bones.
A search did not turn up any information about which is best.
Seems there was a lot of discussion couple years back even to extent of using human bones.
One woman said she was going to make a glaze with her husbands bones.
Hope she can wait.
Anyone have any preference on which bone to pick?
Thanks.
John255


I tweak the amounts of bone ash in my iron saturates. In a glaze that doesn't have any a little seems to help it lean a little more toward red. I didn't know there were two different kinds. Maybe Min can shed some light on this. Who is that masked man/woman anyway? He/she seems to know a lot about iron saturates.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#35 Min

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 11:23 AM


Thank you all for responding to Bailey Red.
I've noticed several, or maybe most, formulas for iron reds contain Bone Ash.
The suppliers have two forms Di-Calcium, and Tri-Calcium.
The Tri version is three times the price.
The cheaper version is made of ground animal bones.
A search did not turn up any information about which is best.
Seems there was a lot of discussion couple years back even to extent of using human bones.
One woman said she was going to make a glaze with her husbands bones.
Hope she can wait.
Anyone have any preference on which bone to pick?
Thanks.
John255


I tweak the amounts of bone ash in my iron saturates. In a glaze that doesn't have any a little seems to help it lean a little more toward red. I didn't know there were two different kinds. Maybe Min can shed some light on this. Who is that masked man/woman anyway? He/she seems to know a lot about iron saturates.

Jim


He/She? I've been called a few names in the past but that's a first : ) No, I don't know a lot about them but I've spent far too much time messing around with glaze tests. The iron red I settled on for use on my clay, M370 Plainsman is Bailey's Red with tricalcium phospate, crocus martis (11.5%) for the iron and soda feldspar not custer. I attached a picture of test tiles with this glaze, hard to capture the sparkles it has without camera glare. Tile on the left is 1 dip, 2 on the right. Breaks darker on edges with 2 dips. It's very smooth, sparkles and survived 3 boiling water/ice water fit tests. My apologies if you already know this but M370 is similar to BMix ^5 with a bit lower expansion.

As an aside, I email Bill Van Gilder about his iron red and concerns about the low silica levels in iron reds, he said that he had talked to a couple glaze tech people and they thought there was nothing to be concerned about since iron is the only thing likely to leach. (I tend to be overly concerned with glaze stability)

Good luck with your glaze testing,

Min (aka he/she : ) - who hates those creepy yellow smiley faces




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#36 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 11:46 AM



Thank you all for responding to Bailey Red.
I've noticed several, or maybe most, formulas for iron reds contain Bone Ash.
The suppliers have two forms Di-Calcium, and Tri-Calcium.
The Tri version is three times the price.
The cheaper version is made of ground animal bones.
A search did not turn up any information about which is best.
Seems there was a lot of discussion couple years back even to extent of using human bones.
One woman said she was going to make a glaze with her husbands bones.
Hope she can wait.
Anyone have any preference on which bone to pick?
Thanks.
John255


I tweak the amounts of bone ash in my iron saturates. In a glaze that doesn't have any a little seems to help it lean a little more toward red. I didn't know there were two different kinds. Maybe Min can shed some light on this. Who is that masked man/woman anyway? He/she seems to know a lot about iron saturates.

Jim


He/She? I've been called a few names in the past but that's a first : ) No, I don't know a lot about them but I've spent far too much time messing around with glaze tests. The iron red I settled on for use on my clay, M370 Plainsman is Bailey's Red with tricalcium phospate, crocus martis (11.5%) for the iron and soda feldspar not custer. I attached a picture of test tiles with this glaze, hard to capture the sparkles it has without camera glare. Tile on the left is 1 dip, 2 on the right. Breaks darker on edges with 2 dips. It's very smooth, sparkles and survived 3 boiling water/ice water fit tests. My apologies if you already know this but M370 is similar to BMix ^5 with a bit lower expansion.

As an aside, I email Bill Van Gilder about his iron red and concerns about the low silica levels in iron reds, he said that he had talked to a couple glaze tech people and they thought there was nothing to be concerned about since iron is the only thing likely to leach. (I tend to be overly concerned with glaze stability)

Good luck with your glaze testing,

Min (aka he/she : ) - who hates those creepy yellow smiley faces






I didn't mean to offend. I started to refer to you as "he" but since you've provided no info about yourself in you profile I have no way of knowing if you are a he or she thus he/she. I hate the creepy yellow smiley faces, too. The glaze on the tile looks a lot like Readers Digest Red. (I know: weird ###### name! I knew how it got it but can't recall now.)

Gerstley Borate ... 31.0
Silica ... 30.0
Kona F-4 ... 20.0
Talc ... 14.0
EPK ... 5.0
RIO ... 15.0

Very dark, as would be expected with that much iron, but rich and with lots of micro-crystals. Unfortunately, it varies a lot depending on the batch of Gerstley Borate.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#37 John255

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 12:43 PM

This conversation is very enjoyable and saving me lots of time.
At 82 I find the saving of time to be important.
I too have spent far too much time testing glazes. It is an addiction.
However, Iron Reds are new for me.
I notice most of the formula's are quite low on alumina which in decorative applications would not be an issue.
Gerstley however is an issue with its variability, and nasty gelling habit.
Guess I will order some Tri-calcium and give the original Bailey scheme a shot.
The rusty orange SH is getting with it on top of SCM is very alluring.
If I can come anywhere near that I'll probably have to sleep with the pieces.
I'm indebted to both of you.
Thank you ever so much for your comments.
John255
John255

#38 Min

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 04:52 PM

This conversation is very enjoyable and saving me lots of time.
At 82 I find the saving of time to be important.
I too have spent far too much time testing glazes. It is an addiction.
However, Iron Reds are new for me.
I notice most of the formula's are quite low on alumina which in decorative applications would not be an issue.
Gerstley however is an issue with its variability, and nasty gelling habit.
Guess I will order some Tri-calcium and give the original Bailey scheme a shot.
The rusty orange SH is getting with it on top of SCM is very alluring.
If I can come anywhere near that I'll probably have to sleep with the pieces.
I'm indebted to both of you.
Thank you ever so much for your comments.
John255


One last little thing with high iron glazes if you haven't made up one before, it will seem very thick when you first mix it up. Measure out the water, mix up the glaze and let it sit for a couple days and the consistancy will thin out. Impulse is to add more water when mixing up but then it's to dilute.

#39 John255

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 05:20 PM

That is a valuable tip Min.
Similar problem with Gerstley Borate.
I used to use Darvan 7 to deflocculate it, but in a few hours it will gell up again and look like it needs water.
With your help I'm really looking forward to getting Spanish Iron Reds, and that has nothing to do with Castilian politics.
John255


John255

#40 JBaymore

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 12:50 PM

....... he said that he had talked to a couple glaze tech people and they thought there was nothing to be concerned about since iron is the only thing likely to leach.


This is true. Thre are a tiny number of people whio actually have a disease whre additional iron would be bad.... but they'd have to use the piece of pottery continually with some sort of acidic material in it to even become CLOSE to an issue.

That being said, if I am remembering correctly Mononna Rossol does mention having knowledge of one legal case where a saturated iron red then oversprayed with red iron oxide on the INSIDE of a coffee mug caused some itron poisioning issues with ........ are you ready for this.... a lawyer who drank coffe out of that mug repeatedly everyday.

But this is a rare exception. (And not exactly a great way to approach the glazing of food surfaces.)

best,

.....................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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