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anniec9

porcelain

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weeble    5

Lots of possibilities there, you might even try NOT glazing it and see what you get. I find the laguna Frost porcelain (cone 5) I've used comes out pretty 'satin' without any glaze on it.

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OffCenter    82

I like Frost, too. Fire it to cone 6. Prone to crack during final stage of drying. Most translucent porcelain I know of. Even whiter and more translucent than Southern Ice (cone 10) and Cool Ice (cone 6).

 

Jim

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I just got a fresh batch of Frost and it seems "new and improved" . The last I had was a two years ago.

There is no tough areas in it as in my previous batch. Has anyone noticed an improvement. I like it better than the Limoges Porcelain I used in France.

 

Marcia

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OffCenter    82

I just got a fresh batch of Frost and it seems "new and improved" . The last I had was a two years ago.

There is no tough areas in it as in my previous batch. Has anyone noticed an improvement. I like it better than the Limoges Porcelain I used in France.

 

Marcia

 

 

Maybe I lucked out, but I never ran into the bad stuff. I haven't noticed it change during the three or four years I've used it. As I've mentioned before, it cracks so easily (and, no amount of compression, working, flipping, slow drying, etc. helps) that I now wedge in just a little bit of paper which solves the cracking problem but is too little to change anything else about it.

 

Jim

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weeble    5

All depends on the temperature you're glaze is designed to fire to, and what you're firing your porcelain to. MOST porcelain fires to stoneware temperatures, cone 5 and up, but most 'earthenware' fires to a significantly lower temperature.

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Benzine    611

I use a low fire white in my classroom, which I like for the projects I do there. But I'm slowly in the process of getting my home studio set up. I've always been interested in using porcelain. I plan to do mostly wheel throwing, and fire oxidation. Would porcelain be a good route to go?

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Chris Campbell    1,088

I like Frost, too. Fire it to cone 6. Prone to crack during final stage of drying. Most translucent porcelain I know of. Even whiter and more translucent than Southern Ice (cone 10) and Cool Ice (cone 6).

 

Jim

 

 

I have worked with both Frost and Southern Ice ... while the Frost is white, seen side by side it is not as white or translucent as Southern Ice. It is lovely though.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I just got a fresh batch of Frost and it seems "new and improved" . The last I had was a two years ago.

There is no tough areas in it as in my previous batch. Has anyone noticed an improvement. I like it better than the Limoges Porcelain I used in France.

 

Marcia

 

 

Maybe I lucked out, but I never ran into the bad stuff. I haven't noticed it change during the three or four years I've used it. As I've mentioned before, it cracks so easily (and, no amount of compression, working, flipping, slow drying, etc. helps) that I now wedge in just a little bit of paper which solves the cracking problem but is too little to change anything else about it.

 

Jim

[/quot

I have an 8 place setting dinner set that dried without any cracks. Plus a bunch of other pieces for some shows. No cracking so far...and they are dry. I did make one mug too thin on the bottom and it did crack.My finger went right through the bottom.

That was my fault and not a cracking problem.

Marcia

 

 

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OffCenter    82

I like Frost, too. Fire it to cone 6. Prone to crack during final stage of drying. Most translucent porcelain I know of. Even whiter and more translucent than Southern Ice (cone 10) and Cool Ice (cone 6).

 

Jim

 

 

I have worked with both Frost and Southern Ice ... while the Frost is white, seen side by side it is not as white or translucent as Southern Ice. It is lovely though.

 

 

I have worked with both Frost and Southern Ice ... while Southern Ice is white, seen side by side it is not as white or tranlucent as Frost. It is lovely though.

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OffCenter    82

I just got a fresh batch of Frost and it seems "new and improved" . The last I had was a two years ago.

There is no tough areas in it as in my previous batch. Has anyone noticed an improvement. I like it better than the Limoges Porcelain I used in France.

 

Marcia

 

 

Maybe I lucked out, but I never ran into the bad stuff. I haven't noticed it change during the three or four years I've used it. As I've mentioned before, it cracks so easily (and, no amount of compression, working, flipping, slow drying, etc. helps) that I now wedge in just a little bit of paper which solves the cracking problem but is too little to change anything else about it.

 

Jim

[/quot

I have an 8 place setting dinner set that dried without any cracks. Plus a bunch of other pieces for some shows. No cracking so far...and they are dry. I did make one mug too thin on the bottom and it did crack.My finger went right through the bottom.

That was my fault and not a cracking problem.

Marcia

 

 

 

 

Maybe I did run into a bad batch! I had lots of problems with cracking and only solved it by adding a tad of paper and have continued to do with every batch after than. Mostly it was the bottom of mugs which I keep very thin. I tried other commercial porcelains and mixed some up from scratch. Southern Ice is almost a translucent as Frost (see disagreement with Chris above) so I was especially happy to find out that they make a cone 6 version called Cool Ice. It was a nice cool white but not as translucent as Frost, so despite the cracking I stuck with Frost. That would be really weird if my latest batch doesn't crack even without paper.

 

Jim

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Chris Campbell    1,088

"But it is whiter" says Chris under her breath

(Couldn't resist! )

 

I had chunks of stuff in my Frost batch so that might have been why it did not come out as well. This was a lot of years ago so I should try it again. Cone 6 would be easier to deal with.

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OffCenter    82

"But it is whiter" says Chris under her breath

(Couldn't resist! )

 

I had chunks of stuff in my Frost batch so that might have been why it did not come out as well. This was a lot of years ago so I should try it again. Cone 6 would be easier to deal with.

 

 

I don't fire to cone 10 very often so I don't use S.I that often and sometimes that has been in an anagama which could make a difference I guess. The biggest difference I've seen is between Cool Ice (which is supposed to be S.I. for cone 6) and Frost 6. The Cool Ice is a nice matte white where the Frost is a satin white but the Cool Ice wasn't as translucent. Let's just say that between Southern Ice and Frost it is pretty damn near a tie.

 

Jim

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OffCenter    82

I just got a fresh batch of Frost and it seems "new and improved" . The last I had was a two years ago.

There is no tough areas in it as in my previous batch. Has anyone noticed an improvement. I like it better than the Limoges Porcelain I used in France.

 

Marcia

 

 

Maybe I lucked out, but I never ran into the bad stuff. I haven't noticed it change during the three or four years I've used it. As I've mentioned before, it cracks so easily (and, no amount of compression, working, flipping, slow drying, etc. helps) that I now wedge in just a little bit of paper which solves the cracking problem but is too little to change anything else about it.

 

Jim

[/quot

I have an 8 place setting dinner set that dried without any cracks. Plus a bunch of other pieces for some shows. No cracking so far...and they are dry. I did make one mug too thin on the bottom and it did crack.My finger went right through the bottom.

That was my fault and not a cracking problem.

Marcia

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Marcia, for the above post! That first half ton of Frost must have been a bad batch after all. After trying everything I could think of nothing stopped the cracking except adding a little paper to Frost. It is so white and so translucent that it was worth the trouble. So, now, a couple of years later your post caused me to throw some wide-bottomed test cylinders with Frost right out of the bag and they didn't crack. Thanks again!

 

Jim

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anniec9    0

Thank you everyone who answered my query re porcelain. I still have a long way to go with this clay, but shall keep plugging along. Thanks again. Annie

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