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bigDave

Have you seen a glaze like this

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bigDave    4

Just Crazy about this glaze. Any one have an idea where to start.

 

Im Firing Ox to ^6 do I have a chance of getting this effect...spots of Siver ish

post-12771-135706793568_thumb.jpg

post-12771-135706795194_thumb.jpg

post-12771-135706793568_thumb.jpg

post-12771-135706795194_thumb.jpg

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Iforgot    2

Okay, I have done something like this, but the silver spots will probably be alot smaller and more numerous. So, first apply two to three thick coats of ms-95 peacock by laguna, let that dry then apply two to four thin coats of blue or light blue shino by coyote. These glazes are usually arround $15 a pint. Fire to cone 5 or 6 in oxidation. I hope this works out!

 

 

Darrel

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bciskepottery    925

You might be able to achieve the look with a celadon or clear glaze with mason stain with an oxide splattered on top . . . maybe manganese dioxide.

 

Hard to tell from photo; the metalic effect may have been caused by slow cooling that promoted some type of crystal growth.

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Ben    7

Those are crystals of something. When molten they are in solution in the glaze, as it cools the glaze can't keep all that material melted and crystals grow. You see it in kaki type glazes where the iron forms crystals. In a different glaze the same amount of iron will stay in solution and lead to a temmoku glaze.

 

I agree that it looks like an oribe.

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JBaymore    1,432

The second picture (on the right) looks like an American Oribe-style glaze with a signifiacnt overabundance of copper in the melt. Add in some very slow cooling, and you get copper oxide stained (and surface oxidized...hence blackish) silicates percipitating on the surface.

 

Super-saturate a cone 5-6 clear glaze with about 5-7% copper carbonate and then slow the cooling of the kiln down.

 

 

The first image (left) looks quite bit different.

 

best,

 

...............john

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