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Mamalynx

Majolica vs underglaze ?

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What is the difference between the two? I have used used both and like them because they stay where I put them. But am wondering what is the appropriate use for each? Should they always be used with a clear coat on top.. or would they be considered food safe without that?

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Underglazes are exactly what they say they are in the title. They go under a clear glaze or a translusent glaze where you can show some colour through.They are applied at the leather hard stage, then the pots are bisqued.

With Majolica, you are painting stains mixed with a flux on top of an opaque white glaze, after the piece has been bisqued.

TJR.

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Underglazes are exactly what they say they are in the title. They go under a clear glaze or a translusent glaze where you can show some colour through.They are applied at the leather hard stage, then the pots are bisqued.

With Majolica, you are painting stains mixed with a flux on top of an opaque white glaze, after the piece has been bisqued.

TJR.

 

 

Actually Majolica is a form of inglaze the way I have understood it. Inglaze being a technique where stains are painted over a glaze, and then during the firing process melt into the surface of the glaze. At least that was the way I remember reading about it years ago. The two process are incredibly similar, but with inglaze you will see more drifting of the stain with the glaze, where as underglaze will stay more in place where painted.

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Underglazes are exactly what they say they are in the title. They go under a clear glaze or a translusent glaze where you can show some colour through.They are applied at the leather hard stage, then the pots are bisqued.

With Majolica, you are painting stains mixed with a flux on top of an opaque white glaze, after the piece has been bisqued.

TJR.

 

 

Actually Majolica is a form of inglaze the way I have understood it. Inglaze being a technique where stains are painted over a glaze, and then during the firing process melt into the surface of the glaze. At least that was the way I remember reading about it years ago. The two process are incredibly similar, but with inglaze you will see more drifting of the stain with the glaze, where as underglaze will stay more in place where painted.

 

 

I think TJR had the better description there. The two processes aren't that similar and there should be no drifting of the stain in majolica.

 

Jim

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Majolica isn't limited to white glaze. It can be done over almost any color of non-moving glaze depending on the opacity of the colors being used for the design on top.

 

Duncan has a great line of low-fire Designer Glazes that are great for Majolica: http://www.ilovetocr...35-1585a761c4a6

 

They also have a great line of satin glazes, that are perfect for Majolica: http://www.ilovetocr...03-43e66160310f

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Commercial underglazes can be applied at any stage prior to glazing- leather hard, bone dry or bisque. I prefer bisque.

 

Many people who do majolica simply use low fire glazes on top of the stiff white (or other color) base glaze. They mix their own base because it's cheaper, dip the pots, then use commercial low fire glazes for the color.

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I am respondonding to Jim and Pres and of course everyone also who is interested. The reason I like Majolica and do Majolica is because the glaze stays in one place. Pres-you might be over firing your base glaze and this is causing it to drift.Get my drift-HA HA!

If I knew how to send pictures, I would send some of my work. I already promised Jim that I would upload some to the gallery. Where does the time go?

TJR.

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I am respondonding to Jim and Pres and of course everyone also who is interested. The reason I like Majolica and do Majolica is because the glaze stays in one place. Pres-you might be over firing your base glaze and this is causing it to drift.Get my drift-HA HA!

If I knew how to send pictures, I would send some of my work. I already promised Jim that I would upload some to the gallery. Where does the time go?

TJR.

 

 

Never had as much luck with anything staying on the side of the pot over top of the glaze. Probably the way I am doing the technique, or my base white glaze. I know it is not from over firing, as I place carefully pieces for the firing, as I know the temps in most of my kiln-25 years tells you that. Hope I don't have to replace it! When I underglaze, I still use a light opaque glaze for the underglaze to come through. I also work color over the glaze with stains through lace and artificial and natural materials, then add accents with brush work.

 

Another thought here is that some people mix maiolica with majolica. Traditionally, Maiolica is an earthenware tin glaze with painted colors over top-with the advent of commercial stains/colors many folks do this at mid to higher temperatures . Whereas Majolica is usually made with lots modelling and pockets with colorful shiny glazes that would pool and thin over the modelling and pockets. All semantics, but true.

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Pres is correct that majolica is used on earthenware. Historically it was developed around the 10th century in Persia after the Persians won a victory and booty over the Chinese. In the booty was proton-porcelain. (I gave a presentation on this at NCECA in the 90s?)

Majolica is a particular tradition of glazing, stretching from Asia Minor across North Africa, into Spain then into Italy produced in high quality during the Renaissance in Faenza.

It is not a question of underglaze verses majolica...they are two separate traditions...two distinct ways to decorate.

 

Marcia

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