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Riorose

drying porcelain in the kiln

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Riorose    1

Could someone please advise me? I have some thick and slightly damp porcelain. What temperature should candling be done? Would you do it until pieces seem bone dry?

 

thank you

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OffCenter    82

Could someone please advise me? I have some thick and slightly damp porcelain. What temperature should candling be done? Would you do it until pieces seem bone dry?

 

thank you

 

 

Just slowly bring the temp up until you get to something like 190 or so. You can't let it get to the boiling point at your altitude and just to be safe maybe stay 20 or so degrees below boiling point. Leave peeps open and/or crack lid just a little to let water escape. It can be bone dry on the outside but still be slightly damp inside so better safe than sorry.

 

Jim

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Mark C.    1,797

Do not let it get 200 degrees or 93 Celsius or it will explode

Let that stay at that temp. for some time (depending on thickness) before turning kiln up.

Mark

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neilestrick    1,381

Put your piece in the kiln upside down as it will dry more evenly. As long as it's well constructed it should be fine drying in the kiln.

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OffCenter    82

Do not let it get 200 degrees or 93 Celsius or it will explode

Let that stay at that temp. for some time (depending on thickness) before turning kiln up.

Mark

 

 

Depends on Altitude. Some places in the Rockies the piece would blow up at 195 degrees F. I don't think there's anyplace that high in Portugal, though.

 

Jim

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TypicalGirl    5

Hi Rio...

Well, here's what I do.

I single fire, and I'm impatient :-)

 

If I want to make sure my ware is completely dry, I use my oven.

Smaller, cheaper and easier than my gas kiln.

 

I start with a cold oven and put my ware in it. I turn the oven to its lowest temp - 170.

I go up 10 degrees every 30 minutes to 220, and there I let it sit for an hour.

Then I take it up to 500 degrees in 25 degree increments every 30 minutes.

At 500, I let it soak for an hour.

 

If I have a piece that I think may be a little damp, I set it on the heater register for the day and let the warm air from the heater dry it out.

Unconventional maybe, but it does work for me :-)

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Riorose    1

Do not let it get 200 degrees or 93 Celsius or it will explode

Let that stay at that temp. for some time (depending on thickness) before turning kiln up.

Mark

 

 

Depends on Altitude. Some places in the Rockies the piece would blow up at 195 degrees F. I don't think there's anyplace that high in Portugal, though.

 

Jim

 

 

I live on the coast. In fact all of this area is flat except for some mild hills sprinkled here and there. BTW, I candled for 7 hours between 50 and 90degrees centigrade. I developed a flu and turned the gas kiln over to my workshop partner. I will go over today to see how they survived. I was still concerned about water contained within thick walls on some pieces. They had tight fitting lids.

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