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MFP

Amaco Celadons

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Fussy how?  I have used them and they do exactly what you make them do.  I think the issue some people have with them is the brushing leaves brush marks that you see after it's fired.  I expected it though, since it's translucent glaze, thick spots are darker, thin spots are lighter.

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Maybe you better give me a quick tutorial on this  brushing application......I used to dip all my pots in 5 gallon buckets....that is not going to happen any more. I have actually seen people reference spray painting glazes....the benefit of which is?  But let's start with the brushing part. 

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Now the spraying makes more sense.  Well.....I could always  pour over a bowl and then put it back in the container.  Thanks for the info on the dry mix. Where did you see  that offered? 

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Celedons like Amaco do not have to  physically move around to break over texture etc... The hard candy clear recipe that we make is a great example. We simply add a small amount of colorant to get the shade (Celedon) we like and the colorant actually moves within the melted glaze just like Amaco except with a custom color palette of our choosing.

The glaze stays put if fired within its design range, but the colorants move and break over the texture within the glaze.

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On 8/5/2019 at 6:31 PM, MFP said:

Thanks! I do really like these glazes if they perform as pictured. 

@MFP

I finally got a decent picture of this. The stemless wine goblet (white wine) in the picture is glazed with the hard candy clear recipe (I think I posted it previously for you). The bottom half is glazed with the clear hard candy with .5% mason stain added to give it the grey color. Notice it still breaks on the chatter even though the glaze itself does not run. In this way we are able to make different color “celedon” type glazes using one base glaze recipe.

AFC69A1E-639B-4F78-B7CC-71C1AE307A44.jpeg

Edited by Bill Kielb

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14 minutes ago, liambesaw said:

What's your hard candy recipe? I need to find one that doesn't foam over my red clay :/

Tall order, never tried on reds but is pretty darn clear and no bubbles on white which is why we stopped at this recipe. Decent RO (Sturdy) and has not crazed on  Frost, 365, and Bmix, plus a stoneware that we have in studio. Always intended to frit this but it’s been so clear left the gerstley. Hope it works for you.

610C867F-513D-4CA7-8D7C-CB9A8D440F6B.jpeg

Edited by Bill Kielb

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22 minutes ago, Bill Kielb said:

Tall order, never tried on reds but is pretty darn clear and no bubbles on white which is why we stopped at this recipe. Decent RO (Sturdy) and has not crazed on  Frost, 365, and Bmix, plus a stoneware that we have in studio. Always intended to frit this but it’s been so clear left the gerstley. Hope it works for you.

610C867F-513D-4CA7-8D7C-CB9A8D440F6B.jpeg

Thanks Bill!

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No....you gave me your cone 10 white recipe....thanks for posting the hard candy one!  I have Mason crimson.....how much should be added?  I really want a brilliant red clear to put on texture.

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Have you tried the VaL Cushing clear on your clay body?  I have a handout of his that has the recipe as well as all the oxide percentages for different colors. 

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I have Mason crimson.....how much should be added?  I really want a brilliant red clear to put on texture.

@MFP

It will take some tests. We usually are in the 1-2% range for these lightly colored celedon style looks.  8-10% zircopax is generally plenty for making something opaque white so somewhere between  0.5% -10 % to your taste would be my guess.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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8 minutes ago, MFP said:

Have you tried the VaL Cushing clear on your clay body?  I have a handout of his that has the recipe as well as all the oxide percentages for different colors. 

I have not, but we have established these glazes to work specifically to  our preference. To give an idea, we do lots of painted underglaze and throw lots of Porcelein and in the gloss clear desire a very high gloss look. So  for us, works on porcelain, fires well over fairly thick underglaze and of course a nice smooth melt (no orange peel) while not moving a bunch at cone 6. 

As you can see we glaze all the way down to the foot as well as the inside of the foot.   So no moving for us. See picture below. It took a bit to settle on these qualities as they are for very custom, one off signature sets, which means I also need to be sure it falls in a very sturdy flux range so I can be reasonably sure they last for a generation or more. There are a bunch of great glazes out there though and Cushing has a lifetime of them.

08139A03-9033-4629-A3CD-EF7CDEA1929A.jpeg

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That's pretty impressive Bill. I am doing some tests with  Frost in this first fire.  I like the New Zealand porcelain that Clay Art Center makes but it is so sticky that it is hard to make nice handles with it. I have had a lot of cracking problems with Frost in comparison to the other porcelains I have been trying. The New Zealand is superior.  I think I have finally overcome most of the cracking problems....I actually started remembering how I used to compress in the past which is not only similar to the video you shared with me but also involves removing all the surface moisture from the bottom with the rib in one last compression. My cracking has minimized since then....but Frost has still been a problem.....it can't be too thick or too thin. 

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6 minutes ago, MFP said:

That's pretty impressive Bill. I am doing some tests with  Frost in this first fire.  I like the New Zealand porcelain that Clay Art Center makes but it is so sticky that it is hard to make nice handles with it. I have had a lot of cracking problems with Frost in comparison to the other porcelains I have been trying. The New Zealand is superior.  I think I have finally overcome most of the cracking problems....I actually started remembering how I used to compress in the past which is not only similar to the video you shared with me but also involves removing all the surface moisture from the bottom with the rib in one last compression. My cracking has minimized since then....but Frost has still been a problem.....it can't be too thick or too thin. 

We use frost a bunch because it is so clean and white and matures at cone 6 however, it is a pain and will crack if not treated extra special throughout. Just love the very clean white especially for these one off collections. Once we find something that works it’s hard to pull away from the success and all the testing to try something new and still complete custom sets.

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The recipe Lady (handle "oldlady" - howevah, ah hesitate to utter "old") posted in http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/20620-does-anyone-recognize-the-source-of-this-glaze-recipe/?tab=comments#comment-165072   "Wollastonite Clear" (per my notes) clears red clay bubbles very well - best of all the clears I've tied (just seven so far). The local JC's "Functional Clear" clears bubbles as well (or better), however, it's 48% gerstley borate, which is a place I don't want to go...

Clearing bubbles has to do with melting earlier on the rise and firming up later on the fall, I believe, per Tony Hansen's articles on bubbles, melt fluidity, etc.? Last firing, dropped 150F from peak, then held for twenty minutes; Wollastonite Clear came out great on the buff and red clays.

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I thought it was a high melting temperature, high fluidity thing since you want to burn out the organics before it melts so they don't bubble through when it's melted.  Either way, I'll mix up a test and see how it do

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Might, this version has additional boron which does make it a very  smooth melt. Have no bubbles in it on my clays so happy with the whites for sure. Late off gassers, maybe. Red clay, likely tough. I’ll dip a couple studio red test tiles and check the results in the next few days to see. We have not had anyone use it on their reds as of yet, I do not believe.

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Is Frost toothy or glassy?  I will show you that New Zealand when it is fired.....CAC says it is the whitest porcelain they have. It's glassy......and it feels like silk under your hands.....it is a real pleasure to throw. I have a 12 inch platter that I am agonizing over how I am going to glaze it.  Hopefully something more than the Frost test tiles will survive to be fired.  Any hints on managing the cracking.....of course....it has been in the 90s here which has not helped. 

On 8/6/2019 at 6:17 PM, Bill Kielb said:

We use frost a bunch because it is so clean and white and matures at cone 6 however, it is a pain and will crack if not treated extra special throughout. Just love the very clean white especially for these one off collections. Once we find something that works it’s hard to pull away from the success and all the testing to try something new and still complete custom sets.

 

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