Jump to content
sine

Looking For A Reliable Emmanuel Cooper Transparent Earthenware Glaze 1050'c Recipe

Recommended Posts

sine    1

Hi if anyone happens to have Emmanuel Cooper's glaze recipe book on a shelf in their studio-

trying to look up recipes online but just will not go my way...

 

Just looking for a reliable  transparent earthenware ( 1050' celcius)  glaze, the glossy the better

 

If anyone happens to have a few minutes to spare!

 

with thanks

Sinéad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sputty    73

Hi Sinéad -

Are you averse to using a lead frit? In my opinion, the best earthenware glazes (bar none) are lead fluxed - but obviously some don't like the idea. In my experience, the quality is simply impossible to match using anything else. Which isn't to say you can't have a lead-free transparent glaze, but...

Have a think which direction you want to go in.

 

My own clear, colourless lead glaze was simply:

 

(White) Earthenware clay - 25% (dried weight)

Lead Bisilicate - 75%

 

Worked like a charm over slips - deep, glossy, superb. Amazing that such a simple glaze could be so beautiful.

 

If you insist on no lead, I can probably find some recipes. But they won't be as good ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sine    1

Hi Sputty, thanks for your reply

The glaze is going over velvets but its bowls that children will be painting themselves

so not really into using lead :(

If was sculptural, decorative etc, wouldn't mind but not for functional bowls

Is indeed a simple glaze recipe!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
triolaz    11

I use 90 Ferro Frit 3124, 10 EPK, and 2 bentonite, fired to cone 03. Cone 04 will work too, you may be able to go even lower. If it crazes, substitute some Frit 3249 for the 3124. Be sure to test because the chemestry of the frit may not be compatible with some of the underglazes. Other than that this is a super easy and reliable lowfire clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oldlady    1,323

sine, i am in the USA and know i have seen that book in public libraries.  i can try to find it here and if you will identify the glaze in some way, i would be happy to copy it or them for you.  even if it is not in the st petersburg, fl library, it may be available on a loan from another library. 

 

finding it on amazon so i have the details at hand would be helpful.  i will look.

 

found a copy in clearwater, title, the potters book of glaze recipes,  dated 1980, 207 pages.  is this the one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sputty    73

The glaze is going over velvets but its bowls that children will be painting themselves

so not really into using lead :(

 

OK - best not to let brush-sucking children anywhere near lead!

 

In which case, triolaz's suggestion will be as good a start as any.

 

Scarva have Frit 3124, although not Frit 3249. The latter is a low-expansion borosilicate frit, but if you look at Scarva, they do stock something they call a 'low expansion borax frit' - it's going to do the same job, isn't it, and possibly even be the same thing. So you're all set.

 

You might find some of the underglaze colour responses... erm... surprising, but you'll only know by trying!

 

---------------------------------------------------------

 

EDIT: Just a thought - are the children going to do the glazing as well as the underglaze decoration, or will you be doing that? The glaze recipe above will not be brushable, or course - you'd have to add CMC or something to enable that.

 

I used to run pottery workshops for adults with disabilities, and I have to admit that in the end it was easier to just buy a ready-made brush-on transparent glaze to go over their decorated pieces, rather than mess about making my own. That way the students could glaze their own pieces as well as do the underglaze decoration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

I will look after breakfast. If I have it here in Montana or if it is still in Texas. think I saw it here.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bciskepottery    925

from his book . . .

 

Clear Glaze

Calcium borate frit, 65%

Red clay, 35%

"A clear, well fitting glaze."

 

Clear Glaze

Calcium borate frit, 25%

Standard borax frit, 25%

Feldspar (soda), 20%

Cornish stone, 20%

Whiting, 5%

Zinc oxide, 5%

"A reliable, clear glaze that runs pale chun blue on red clay."

 

Clear Glaze

High alkaline frit, 10%

Standard borax frit, 50%

Ball clay, 30%

Cornish stone, 10%

"A good, clear glaze."

 

There are more . . . pages 42 - 43.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sine    1

Thanks Oldlady! thats the one 1980- an excellent and very handy book to have, even as a starting point for a certain glaze.

I know there can be huge differences in materials between Usa and Europe and there are similar type materials

I don't usually glaze at all in my own work, so am very out of date with the equivalents!

Thanks again :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sine    1

Thanks Sputty, no I do the glazing myself- the kids are only at the splodge and drag stage! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sine    1

Bciskepottery- thats exactly what I'm looking for

Thank you for taking the time- you're a star :)

 

the last recipe one sounds ideal- the glaze will be on white earthenware clay with 

underglaze velvets painted on.....

 

Thanks again 

ps. I will some day get my own copy of the book :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

I am afraid my book is still in Texas. I will be getting it an about 2 weeks.

Sorry it isn't sooner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×