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phill

cone 10 shino, no crawling

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I keep looking for a shino that doesnt crawl (maybe acts more like a celedon?) but find very few. I know i need to do some testing, but am wondering if anyone has a good base recipe that is super simple that might be on the smoother side of shinos.

 

i know the basic neph sye 70 / clay 30. this seems a bit dry from what i have seen.

 

another question:

would adding more neph sye smooth it out? or would i have to add a different flux? i see a lot of soda ash but i hate that stuff as it burns the skin.

 

and another question:

has anyone ever added red iron oxide, yellow ochre, or something similar to a shino glaze? just curious about your results. i kind of want to see if i can make a dark brick red shino color.

 

thanks everyone!

 

ps - pictures are nice if you have them. words are harder for this layman.

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Most Shino glazes will crawl easily, but i've not had severe problems with crawling in Shino unless I didn't wash my bisque. I'd look at this as a culprit if you're not thoroughly cleaning the dust off of your bisque already.

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Some clay's vary a lot per batch. We all use EPK for many glazes, they put together a pretty consistent product considering it's a mixture of many clays to get the formula that we expect in each bag. I do see some variance in EPK. Once in college we had a load come in with some EPK that was quite odd looking, pretty dark compared to most of the EPK batches I'd seen. I noted the high clay content glazes we made over the next several weeks from that batch had a higher tendency of crawling. I chalked it up to a variance in the bag of EPK we were using. The next batch was the creamy white we're all used to and the glazes returned to normal. If you're using glaze recipes and subbing a different clay this can very easily cause crawling in any shino that wasn't intended to crawl. If you've gotten a "bad" batch of any dry raw material, this can also cause problems in a shino. Another problem I've had is that I used to be a bit heavy handed in glaze mixing. My lack of caring about a pinch here and a pinch there blew up in my face when I first began to work with Shino.

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I don't know if it is still available or not, but all of us included in the show had our shino recipes published in a digital-CD/print catalog from the invitational shino exhibition put together by Malcolm Davis which was held at Baltimore Clayworks as a part of the NCECA conference there. You might check with Baltimore Clayworks to see if it is still able to be obtained.

 

There is a lifetime of experimentation contained in that document.

 

best,

 

.....................john

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Thanks everyone for responding!

 

Benhim--not washing my bisque ware could be it. ive never done it, because ive never really had bad results not doing it.

 

so, how does that work? rinse, and glaze immediately after? or do you have to wait a day for it to dry again? i know they pot will soak up a ton of water when you scrub the pot down and become saturated...i cant imagine glazing right after but who knows. can you (in a short description) tell me a little more please?

 

thanks!

 

bciske- i do own that book and have read and reread it many a time. thanks though!

 

cathy- thanks for the website! ironically, i saw that site probably just a month beforehand!

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I keep looking for a shino that doesnt crawl (maybe acts more like a celedon?) but find very few. I know i need to do some testing, but am wondering if anyone has a good base recipe that is super simple that might be on the smoother side of shinos.

 

i know the basic neph sye 70 / clay 30. this seems a bit dry from what i have seen.

 

another question:

would adding more neph sye smooth it out? or would i have to add a different flux? i see a lot of soda ash but i hate that stuff as it burns the skin.

 

and another question:

has anyone ever added red iron oxide, yellow ochre, or something similar to a shino glaze? just curious about your results. i kind of want to see if i can make a dark brick red shino color.

 

thanks everyone!

 

ps - pictures are nice if you have them. words are harder for this layman.

 

 

 

I live and die by Steve Loucks' carbon trapping shino... rich reds, lusterous tan, crystallized green (according to thickness of application.)

 

 

Steve Loucks Shino

 

Neph Sy - 45

Spodumene - 15

OM-4 - 15

F-4 feldspar - 10

Red Art clay - 5

----------------------

Soda Ash - 18

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I live and die by Steve Loucks' carbon trapping shino... rich reds, lusterous tan, crystallized green (according to thickness of application.)

 

Steve Loucks Shino

 

Neph Sy - 45

Spodumene - 15

OM-4 - 15

F-4 feldspar - 10

Red Art clay - 5

----------------------

Soda Ash - 18

 

 

hey thanks a lot! do you have a good picture of the resulting glaze?

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Bump.

 

I finally found/made a great shino!

 

I call it "American Shino" as I took many American recipes and tested them to find traits I liked and disliked. Then I twiddled with the recipes until I made it to my liking.

 

american shino

 

American Shino:

50...Neph Sye

25...OM4 Ball Clay

25...Spodumene    

0-2%...Soda Ash

bciskepottery likes this

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I looked in John Britt's High Fire Glazes book and fiddled with the Shino's listed there, and continued to try other recipes I found online or that were from other potters. After getting the results back, I tweaked different recipes that showed signs of promise. My favorite was Randy Johnston's Dry Shino #16 found on page 81 of Britt's book. I liked how orange it could get. I found out that I should try Spodumene, a material I am not as familiar with and continued to play around. I found that I like less soda ash than Randy Johnston's recipe. 3% was just too much for me, I don't care for the mottled green that comes with the ash. Since he has a drier recipe, I increased the nepheline syenite and decreased the clay content and spodumene (this just followed suit to make 100% as I don't know much about it). 

 

Finally, something I absolutely love! Thick to thin, a wonderful glaze. 

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I keep looking for a shino that doesnt crawl (maybe acts more like a celedon?) but find very few. I know i need to do some testing, but am wondering if anyone has a good base recipe that is super simple that might be on the smoother side of shinos.

 

i know the basic neph sye 70 / clay 30. this seems a bit dry from what i have seen.

 

another question:

would adding more neph sye smooth it out? or would i have to add a different flux? i see a lot of soda ash but i hate that stuff as it burns the skin.

 

and another question:

has anyone ever added red iron oxide, yellow ochre, or something similar to a shino glaze? just curious about your results. i kind of want to see if i can make a dark brick red shino color.

 

thanks everyone!

 

ps - pictures are nice if you have them. words are harder for this layman.

Phil;Try adding 5% Redart. It seives out a little coase, but makes a nice red. Sorry,no pics.TJR

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Phil;Try adding 5% Redart. It seives out a little coase, but makes a nice red. Sorry,no pics.TJR

Thanks! Someday I will try this!

 

I was posting because I had recently been really happy with my current Shino results and that is why I bumped this.

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Nothing beats a good brain-crawl shino! Bisque firing a bit hotter can help some, too. But many shinos like to crawl, especially when thick.

Neil....I'd very much like to get a copy of the issue of studio potter that you reference (Studio Potter, Volume 21, Number 1, December, 1992)  But it is not available via Studio Potter.  Do you know where I can get a print or digital copy?

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Nothing beats a good brain-crawl shino! Bisque firing a bit hotter can help some, too. But many shinos like to crawl, especially when thick.

Neil....I'd very much like to get a copy of the issue of studio potter that you reference (Studio Potter, Volume 21, Number 1, December, 1992)  But it is not available via Studio Potter.  Do you know where I can get a print or digital copy?

 

 

I may have a paper copy somewhere in my files. If I find it, I'll scan it and post it here.

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bump. 

 

Neil, did you ever find that article? I also contacted studio potter and they couldn't get a back issue. They offered to send me a printed article but only if I was a member. Unfortunately, I am not. :(

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bump. 

 

Neil, did you ever find that article? I also contacted studio potter and they couldn't get a back issue. They offered to send me a printed article but only if I was a member. Unfortunately, I am not. :(

 

You can fix that........ and get a great mag at the same time.

 

best,

 

....................john

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Phil, I agree with TJR, red art in shino is where it's at!! I find shino crawling to be heavily related to thickness of application. I also notice that how it looks once the glaze has dried will tell you if it will crawl. Rub out the little crack lines with your finger, and I find this helps.

Here's an image of the shino recipe below. The repaired mug is a much darker clay than the other cup. Maybe putting a red art wash under your existing recipe would do something interesting?

post-63667-0-51398200-1403880411_thumb.jpg

post-63667-0-51398200-1403880411_thumb.jpg

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Argh. The recipe is

39 neph sye

17 kaolin (epk)

16 soda ash

13 ball clay

9 kona feldspar

6 red art

 

I know you mentioned hating the soda ash, but the carbon trap is soooo nice. I wear tight fitting nitrile gloves (latex=itchy).

As a plus, this glaze NEVER hard pans.

Cal

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Thanks Diesel. That is nice the glaze doesn't settle! It is always fun looking at shino recipes. They are all a little different! Yeah, not a fan of the large amount of soda ash, not because it eats my skin away though. I just don't like the muddied green color the ash gives on the shino. 

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