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hansen

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About hansen

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    http://americanpotter.blogspot.com

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    Alexandria, Virginia
  1. Raku Kilns

    I once built the classic updraft, wood-fired raku kiln, but basically used it to fire burnished work in. The local clay was extremely fine particle 300 million year old earthenware clay, all you had to do was rub it with a soft cloth to get a burnished surface, the kiln was made out of brick covered with a layer of clay, and I had construction crews dump wood off at the house. The pictures are in the Leach book as well as the Cardew book, if you don't know the titles, google the authors with the word "pottery" h a n s e n
  2. What's Your Favorite Tool

    I get cheap pottery tools at the supplier, the wooden rib shaped roughly like a triangle is my all time favorite, that one and a piece of sponge (any kind) and a ball of string and I'm ready to go. h a n s e n p.s. or if I want to get fancy I use the credit-card shaped rib, the semi-circle rib, and the wooden knife tool instead of the triangular rib. I always use rosewood tools, the do well if I forget and leave then in the water. pps - seawool just gets better the longer you have it around, I try not to use too much of it as it is environmentally very precious ppps - if I had to use one tool and one tool only it would probably be the kiln. I could get rid ofa ll the rest and still get by. The kiln is indispensible.
  3. Electric Reduction Firing?

    Anyway, I know this has been asked for several times but I just made the connection. Here is how to convert an old electric kiln into a gas reduction kiln. You don't have to have an old electric however, just use soft brick, figure the top out somehow. Dimensions should be adjustable but pretty close to standard specifications. - hansen http://www.jossresearch.org/kilns/paragon/conversion.html I think I have heard of making a fairly air tight sagger filled with chracoal & the work in it used in some kilns. Suggesting this for electric may pose some problems, but on a small scale in an older kiln it might be worth experimenting with. For glazed pieces, with front loading electrics, raku firing is possible, with post-fire reduction in either combustibles or water, but possibly dangerous. I hesitate to suggest either of these options, it's probably wiser to build a small updraft fired with propane for your reduction, and that also allows higher temperatures h a n s e n
  4. Electric Reduction Firing?

    I think I have heard of making a fairly air tight sagger filled with chracoal & the work in it used in some kilns. Suggesting this for electric may pose some problems, but on a small scale in an older kiln it might be worth experimenting with. For glazed pieces, with front loading electrics, raku firing is possible, with post-fire reduction in either combustibles or water, but possibly dangerous. I hesitate to suggest either of these options, it's probably wiser to build a small updraft fired with propane for your reduction, and that also allows higher temperatures h a n s e n
  5. uh - how much are you asking for it/ I did a search for Albany Slip and it brought this up. I have a 50 pound bag of Albany Slip and would like to sell it and hoped someone would give me an idea where to list such an item. Thanks.
  6. New Kiln And Venting

    Cellar? either vent the kiln or vent the kiln room, we're talking about formaldhyde from bisques, potentially lead, manganese, chrome, etc,. from gloss h a n s e n
  7. karen - i'd love to send pix but i am still challenged on hoe to turn 1800+ mg in to less than 500 h a n s e n Would love to see photos of the various studios, it is so neat to see different folks' solutions to space and money obstacles. Oh, and I would love to be a recipient of a kiln and wheel, or a slabroller.... I work at a chair in the spare bedroom, my jars of glaze in bins on the floor around my chair, brushes, sponge, towel and water on the end table next to the chair, and the piece I am glazing on a tray in my lap. Help! I need a studio space to call my own
  8. Blue Glaze Cone 6

    Look in : http://ceramicartsdaily.org/category/ceramic-glaze-recipes/mid-range-glaze-recipes/ hansen
  9. Clayart Dead?

    p.s. actually most of the objections to using ClayArt and ClayCraft come form not opening up a new gmail account solely for the purpose of getting them. They work just fine then. Gmail is a wonderful thing. h a n s e n
  10. Glaze Mixing Services

    Sounds interesting - I might use that. But, when they say, shipped to your door, mine will sit outdoors for a few hours? Are they packaged in plastic so as to manage bad weather? h a n s e n
  11. Seat For Potters Wheel

    it feels like the sciatic nerve but probably the pinched nerve is in the 3rd, 4th and 5th lumbar vert. Classic symptoms. core strength is very important. I do ab crunches, leg lifts, and cobra/locust/boat asanas as well as pirformis, quad and hamstring stretches. i would see how much hamstring stretches help, they help me a lot. h a n s e n
  12. Seat For Potters Wheel

    core strength is very important. I do ab crunches, leg lifts, and cobra/locust/boat asanas as well as pirformis, quad and hamstring stretches. i would see how much hamstring stretches help, they help me a lot. h a n s e n
  13. Electric Kiln Firing

    This is not outside the window that electric kilns normally fire to, the one & two cone difference. "Soak, hold, and ramp down" is what the best advice is. That and find glazes with broader ranges, or ones that will still be nice slightly over-fired. You don't want under-fired. Try going a cone higher, say cone 7. Usually electric kilns because they fire so fast and have no thermal mass to speak of, as gas kilns with all those pots & shelving & soaps, etc. get a lot more maturing time for the glazes. Your approach is correct, just hang in there!! This happens to everybody h a n s e n
  14. Or fiber board, like fiber blanket, they are high alumina refractory products. Maybe stucco panels, that is how stucco comes now. If you put the kiln on casters, they need to be locking casters. This could help with the space problems.
  15. Elsewhere on this forum we were talking about the suck factor, the percentage of wasters and reclaim vs. the percentage of finished successful pots. When the percentage of waste goes down, we need more challenges, need to take more risks. This keeps us from getting bored with clay, which we never actually acknowledge to ourselves consciously. If we want those challenges and risk within the clay medium, we have to do things we are not accustomed to doing. So, even though the results were ugly, I started painting black on white on pots. So my advice is mix it up a little, more handle pulling, more lid making, more coil pots, more throwing off the hump, slab work, etc. whatever it is that is different from what you have been doing. h a n s e n
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