Jump to content


Photo

Heat Work Or Atmosphere?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,214 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 21 April 2011 - 10:05 AM

If I fired the same glaze on the same pot with the same firing profile in different places ...
Say at sea level, mile high in Denver, dry on the desert or wet in Seattle ...
Would I be able to expect the same results?

How much does climate and altitude affect glaze results?

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#2 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 681 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:49 PM

If I fired the same glaze on the same pot with the same firing profile in different places ...
Say at sea level, mile high in Denver, dry on the desert or wet in Seattle ...
Would I be able to expect the same results?

How much does climate and altitude affect glaze results?


Hi Chris I'm surprised that no one has answered your question. perhaps someone who has a studio in the mountains. I pondered your question and decided that the lack of oxygen could make a difference in the reduction of a glaze in a oxidation firing. It may not be visible to the naked eye but some difference could be seen under a microscope I think of heat of the kiln would displace any difference in humidity levels. Of course I don't have to deal with any of those problems, I live in Kansas and were pretty much in the middle of the scales. I hope this question wasn' t a delayed April fools Joke that I didn't get but I hate to see a unanswered question floating around the forum that I may be able to help with. Denice

#3 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,214 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 27 April 2011 - 09:09 AM

No, not a joke at all.
I was wondering why so many people have trouble getting their glaze results to match the images in the catalogues.

Now, glaze companies employ chemists to formulate glazes that are consistent and predictable. So what happens between their factory and your cooled kiln?
To my mind, vague directions like fire to witness cone 5 are not much help. There are a thousand ways of doing that!
Would it help if they published exactly how they glazed and fired the piece or would you still be affected by where you lived?

I know there is no substitute for testing your own glaze on your own clay in your own kiln ... but is there some way to narrow the range of error?

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#4 clay lover

clay lover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 896 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 27 April 2011 - 09:31 AM

No, not a joke at all.
I was wondering why so many people have trouble getting their glaze results to match the images in the catalogues.

Now, glaze companies employ chemists to formulate glazes that are consistent and predictable. So what happens between their factory and your cooled kiln?
To my mind, vague directions like fire to witness cone 5 are not much help. There are a thousand ways of doing that!
Would it help if they published exactly how they glazed and fired the piece or would you still be affected by where you lived?

I know there is no substitute for testing your own glaze on your own clay in your own kiln ... but is there some way to narrow the range of error?



#5 clay lover

clay lover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 896 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 27 April 2011 - 09:36 AM

I wish there was. That is the basis of my strontium topic, that didn't get much play either???

Steven Hill told me to read 'The many faces of iron" in the Ceramics Monthly book on clay and glazes. (It is also on line) to see the difference temp makes in glaze results. I know from my experience that my glaze colors are VERY different with different soak and cooling times.

I hope more people chime in here, this is an important topic to those who are seriously working at improving glaze results.

#6 Pam S

Pam S

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • LocationDurham, NC

Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:43 PM

I've come to the conclusion that it is all about your knowledge of your kiln and use of glaze. I'm still stumped on many! I've had commercial glazes come out both great and awful. Same with formulas that were great in (a now defunct) studio. The tried and true formula for Eggshell, once a semi matte, speckle is coming out a shiny beige with no speckles. I followed the directions to the T. However, my kiln is much smaller than the studio where we previously fired this glaze. At this point, all I can say is test, test, test. I really wish I could put a piece of commercially glazed work in the kiln and it come out like the photos. That is disappointing! I have gotten feedback from the manufactures when I whine and email. Do this, do that. Why don't they give you this info when you buy the product? Okay, off my soapbox...

"Saving just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users