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TortoiseAvenger

Good Recipe For Red Oxide Stain?

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I just posted a thread about using cadmium, and was told that it was fugitive at ^6.

 

Any other recommendations? This stain will be used for small details on sculpture, so I'm not concerned about toxicity.

 

Ideally, the color would be valentine red.

 

Thanks!

 

TA

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It might be a good idea to start a library for yourself on glazes.  Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by John Hesselberth is probably a good place to start, if you haven't got it already.  

 

If I'm not mistaken, red's a tough colour to get in oxidation in cone 6 and beyond.  Iron might work, but you're likely going to get more of a rusty colour than a "valentine" red.  Lots of experimentation to be done, I think.

 

Good luck on your search. :)

 

Edit:  Sometimes taking the time to search this forum via Google can help a lot, too:

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/395-searching-for-red-cone-6-oxidation-glaze/

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I have some reds posted in my gallery under the topic of forum discussion.

 

Michael Bailey's Red is a good iron red. You could google Randy's Red too.I don't have that. These are wide spread published glazes.

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/682-baileys-red-orange-6-oxidation/

I'd recommend what Tyler suggests and start a good library. Mastering ^6 Glazes is a good start and I also like Michael Bailey's ^6 glazes. He separates the glazes by their fluxes and the discussion goes from there.

Good little technical book.

 

Marcia

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How about just using red underglaze and if necessary for it to be glossy with a clear glaze over it? I use Spectrum Christmas and fire to about ^7, it stays very red. 

http://www.spectrumglazes.com/500_3.html

 

You could also test out some of the chrome tin glazes, one in the Mastering Cone 6 Glazes book that Tyler mentioned. A picture and another recipe here: http://janwallacepottery.blogspot.ca/2012/04/reliable-cone-6-glaze-chrome-tin-red.html

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I vote for red underglaze or commercial glaze. Affordable, ready to go. I use Spectrum underglazes too. At cone 6 and the colors hold up great.  I have never seen a recipe for a valentine red that looks anywhere near as good as the commercial red glazes.

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like others have said already, commercial underglazes/glazes are pretty stable at ^6 even though most of them are low-fire.  I like using the underglazes because you should be getting more pigment for your money and they seem to work well mixed into or layered with homemade glaze bases - "really red" duncan is a reliable one for example.  not all of them work, but most do.

 

a tip i learned a long time ago from another sculptor - fingernail polish works wonders for the times that you only need a tiny detail of color on a sculpture (example was irises of eyes or drip of blood, etc) instead of buying stains or UG.  it's cheap, looks like glaze unless you're super close, and comes in pretty much every color.

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like others have said already, commercial underglazes/glazes are pretty stable at ^6 even though most of them are low-fire.

 

Several of the commercial underglaze brands are rated for cone 6, such as Spectrum and Coyote. Amaco also puts out a charts showing their Velvets at cone 6. Lots of cone 6 commercial red glazes, too.

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