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Trimming A Foot For Bowls

trimming foot bowls

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#21 clay lover

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:53 PM

calipers, what a good idea.  I am also visual, will give them a try.



#22 Biglou13

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:37 PM

Anyone ever use something like this.

Ultrasonic thickness gauge?
http://www.defelsko....sitectorutg.htm

When I was struggling with trimming I thought of it.
I even found some wide mouthed digital calipers.

I'm glad I didn't spend the cash. I finally figured it out old school style. Like the ancient potters before our time.

Don't get me wrong I'm not diss'n the technology...
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#23 Min

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 11:19 PM

I 100% agree with all the posts about practice, tapping and pressing the base. I can appreciate that there are times before you have perfected this that it's nice to have a pot with the proper weight.

 

Simple method using pencils and a tape measure here: http://ceramicartsda...-pottery-wheel/



#24 PSC

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 12:54 AM

I use the push test too. Just push lightly on the side or bottom and look for slight movement.

#25 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 10:21 AM

Hi David,

 

Not to beat a dead horse, but practice is the best thing you can do for your trimming. The tap method that others have brought up is great when working on a new form, but once you've thrown and trimmed the same form a bunch of times, you'll just start to know how much you want/need to trim.

 

Here's a link to a video by Hsin Chuen Lin focused on achieving even thickness through trimming. He shows you how to make an easy DIY measuring tool that is more accurate (albeit more complicated) than basic calipers. https://www.youtube....h?v=Ab1GgB4jt1o

 

Cheers,

 

Chris


Christopher Vaughn Pottery
Functional stoneware forms
handcrafted in Burlington, Vermont

 

www.ChrisThrowsPots.com

 

On Instagram @chris_throws_pots
 

 

 

 


#26 Davidpotter

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:45 PM

once again. it's all practice.

"practice, practice, practice. Then, when you think you've practiced enough, the real practice begins"


Practice, practice, practice. Then when you think you've practiced enough, the real practice begins.

#27 alabama

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:00 PM

Hey,

 

     I palm in the bottom of everything - cups and bowls.  That gives me the option of trimming a foot or not.

I trim everything right side up plus I trim an outside foot so I can dip the item upside down in the glaze, it provides

a space to stop glaze runs, and it gives a grip to rinse it off under the faucet also.  Since the bottoms are palmed,

to trim the foot I start from 1/2 inch from the edge and trim towards the center level til the clay runs out.  That way,

its impossible to trim thru.  With the vessel sitting right side up, I center and trim the lip and move down re-centering

about every two inches til I get to the bottom.  That way, its impossible to trim one side thinner than the other.

    There are several really good ideas on trimming... I hope you try several ways just to see which one works best for

your pottery forms.  I trim everything leather hard and tap the sides all the way down and listen to the sound of the tap

to see how thick the sides are..   If the sides are leather hard and dents slightly with alittle pressure, then I know its 1/4 inch thick.

     If anything I make is not palmed or dries out before its trimmed they are all soaked back down.

 

Good luck,

Alabama



#28 clay lover

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:29 PM

What is 'palmed' ?  I have never heard that term.



#29 schmism

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:49 PM

I think that

 

What is 'palmed' ?  I have never heard that term.

 

I think that is another term for "thumbing off" a "no trim" foot.  which is to say,  a mostly flat bottom no foot piece.



#30 alabama

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 02:26 PM

What is 'palmed' ?  I have never heard that term.

Years ago Jack Troy was a speaker/demonstrator at an Alabama Clay Conference at Tuscaloosa when he suggested that vessels should be "palmed".

When the pots are leather hard, take your palm and make a concave indention on the bottom.  They give the option to trim a foot or not and insure

that the vessel is unlikely to wobble.  Plus, if you make an 18th century German twisted wire tool, it highlights the cut marks.  To me its one level higher than

the standard stainless steel braided wire tool that is in all the kits.  And when the bottom made from the twisted wire tool is stained and wiped off 

it looks impressive with your signature and the "horseshoe" wire tool marks.

In my most humble opinion. ;>)

Alabama



#31 clay lover

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 10:42 PM

wouldn't that 'concave indention' make a raised center in the inside of the pot?  I'm thinking of the bowls with the humps in the center, maybe from to much thinning when trimming.



#32 alabama

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 10:32 AM

wouldn't that 'concave indention' make a raised center in the inside of the pot?  I'm thinking of the bowls with the humps in the center, maybe from to much thinning when trimming.

Hey,

     In most cases, while you're palming the bottom on the outside, you're watching the bottom on the inside.  A slight concave indention won't make

a "domed" inside.  And to trim a foot with a palmed bottom, just go 1/4" from the edge, dig the blade of the trimming tool to a depth of about 1/16th

of an inch and go towards the middle of the vessel level.  Since you aren't following the concave surface to the middle the trimmings get thinner and

you run out of clay to trim about half way to the middle.  So if you do decide about trimming a foot, it takes about 25 seconds of trimming instead of the old way of trimming from the edge of the foot to the middle and eventually thru the bottom.  Most of my vessels don't have a trimmed foot, but none of my pots

wobble or spin while soup is being served,(I saw that once in someone else's bowl.)  The Lazy Susan soup bowl never caught on for a reason!! ;>)

Later,

Alabama







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