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Can ^6 Oribe Green Be Modified To Lose Shine & Become Matte?

not a chemist!

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#1 oldlady

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 11:32 AM

recently, i have been making lots of things with leaves as the main focus so most of my glazes have been variations of green.  the one i most often use is Oribe using the recipe Bill van Gilder gives in workshops.  it is a great green, allowing the veining of the leaves to show easily but it is very shiny.  i have other green glazes to spray  randomly as accents but i would love to have a more matte version of Oribe.  i understand adding clay might help but i am not a chemist. (read wizard alchemist) 

 

some of you chemical gurus will know immediately how to do this.  not a big change, just more matte.  will you please share your advice?

 

Oribe Green

 

zinc oxide...................................8

Edgar plastic kaolin...................12

whiting.......................................24

silica..........................................24

custer feldspar..........................32

 

total..........................................100

 

add copper carbonate................4%

bentonite....................................1%

 

 

thank you.


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#2 oldlady

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 02:03 PM

thank you!  i have all these ingredients so i will try it.

 

the reason i like the recipe i use is that it will not run unless i really put a huge amount on a sloping corner.  your photo shows a lovely color range but i think i notice crackling in the center section.  am i seeing things that are not there?  i admit i need new glasses.

 

anybody else got a good one?  george wettlaufer's recipe ^6 18 comes out wonderfully matte and spraying it in various thicknesses results in a range of greens that look like natural color.  


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#3 oldlady

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:23 AM

thank you, i will await your results.  maybe you will have a new favorite glaze recipe.


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#4 oldlady

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:05 PM

norm, thanks for the help.  exactly what is in the photo, the underfired test?  the kiln is down to 578 right now on my last firing of the year.  big sale this weekend.(i hope)

 

 the test i put in was the original recipe with your adjustment down in silica to 21.6 and the addition of 5% talc,  i did a dip on a typical test tile similar to the one you show and a broken piece of a large platter edge with a flat area.  probably will open it in the morning.  the outside temp here is very low compared to last week so maybe my unheated garage will speed the cooling and i will get it out tonight.

 

according to the NOAA radar for the country,  i am going to be in the middle of the weather front that has hurt so much of the country during the past week and it will hit here within an hour or so.  having a nice, warm studio is such a blessing on a day like this.  hope everyone else is safe and warm.


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#5 oldlady

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:32 PM

thanks norm, i couldn't wait, i opened the kiln at 370, took out the tests on the top shelf and closed it up again.  they both look exactly the same as the original oribe.  no matteness but maybe a little deeper green in the lines.  very attractive.   sorry, no picture, i left my camera in another town and have to go pick it up.


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#6 Biglou13

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:33 PM

Is it still an oribe if so far altered?
Or is it a flat green glaze?
Is it oribe just because you have a similar colored glaze?
Is oribe a style? Or a color of glaze?
What rules dictate oribe?

Me thinks the term is used too loosely. (No disrespect). Does the glaze or the form follow in the tradition of "oribe".

Luckily oribe (IMHO) is a oxidation fired process which may make it easier to replicate color. But I think respect must be paid to tradition of design, form, style, technique, even material before before considering the word. Perhaps oribe-like may be more appropriate.

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#7 oldlady

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:38 PM

sorry, norm, been busy.  the glaze i tested is the one you sent me back, modified by reducing the silica and adding talc.

 

big lou, i am just repeating the name of the glaze recipe given to me and the world in a book by Bill van Gilder.  i do not want to offend anything, anybody, any tradition, any anything.

 

and for anyone interested, the base glaze takes colors from mason stains beautifully, the yellow is particularly nice.


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#8 Norm Stuart

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:56 AM

Finally, a test tile fired correctly with a slow-cool of Van Gilder Oribe Green with Talc and less Silica.  Beautiful translucence with less shine.

 

med_gallery_18533_643_390674.jpg

sorry, norm, been busy.  the glaze i tested is the one you sent me back, modified by reducing the silica and adding talc.

 

big lou, i am just repeating the name of the glaze recipe given to me and the world in a book by Bill van Gilder.  i do not want to offend anything, anybody, any tradition, any anything.

 

and for anyone interested, the base glaze takes colors from mason stains beautifully, the yellow is particularly nice.

 

thanks norm, i couldn't wait, i opened the kiln at 370, took out the tests on the top shelf and closed it up again.  they both look exactly the same as the original oribe.  no matteness but maybe a little deeper green in the lines.  very attractive.   sorry, no picture, i left my camera in another town and have to go pick it up.



#9 Roberta12

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 12:02 PM

Lovely, Norm!   One more question about "Norm's Silky Green Oribe".   Was this the slow cool  (50 degree/hr between 1800-1500)?

 

Roberta



#10 Norm Stuart

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 12:08 PM

Yes.  Or in Celsius, that's 28 C per hour between 982 C and 815 C.

 

Lovely, Norm!   One more question about "Norm's Silky Green Oribe".   Was this the slow cool  (50 degree F/hr between 1800 F - 1500 F)?

 

Roberta



#11 Biglou13

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 05:57 PM

try increasing the epk

ive has sucess with matting down glazes by making them less glassy.(also less mature)

again test

there are other ways but it worked for me


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#12 neilestrick

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:18 AM

I would replace some of the whiting with dolomite, like up to half, and slow down the cooling a bit. Test....


Neil Estrick
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