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terraforma

Sure-Fire Recipe For A True Black Oxide Stain In ^10 Reduction?

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terraforma    4

I once had access to a black oxide stain that fired to a true jet black in cone 10 reduction (college classes). At my current membership studio, their "black" oxide stain actually fires to darkish brown in their cone 10 reduction firings. I don't know what their formula is, but I assume they just mix black iron oxide and water. I also don't know any details of their firing methodology as far as temps, ramping schedule, or amount of reduction.

 

Can anyone provide, or point to, a black oxide stain recipe that they know from experience is reliably (as close as possible to) true-black for this type of firing?

 

I appreciate any help—thanks!

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oldlady    1,323

are you able to contact your old "college classes" school and ask what the recipe was?

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JBaymore    1,432

Is this for use doing things like signing the bottom of pots.... or are you looking to paint over glazes and such?

 

best,

 

................john

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perkolator    54

Best Black #6600 mason stain is a really good black stain that doesn't go brown or blue.  Also, Amaco Jet Black Velvet Underglaze is a great black UG that is a true black.

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terraforma    4

John—Thank you—I'd like to to use it for both purposes as well as stain decoration on bisque, but it would be more important to me to have it remain true black when applied over glazes.

 

Thanks, perkolator—I like the mason stain for some purposes, but it's pretty expensive compared to oxides. Does the Amaco glaze hold up at ^10 reduction?

 

oldlady—I don't have that instructor's current contact info, but will search for it if I can't find a recipe otherwise.

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perkolator    54

yes, black mason stain is expensive - you gotta pay to play! :D   it's because someone's already done all the work in getting the tried and true color you want, even more so for an encapsulated mason stains like reds.  sure you can get black with oxides, but usually they aren't the same type of black and either go brown or blue depending on what you make it with.  #6600 is a great black, as is #6612 and #6650.  if you're doing washes, a little should go a long way.

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