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Glaze Chemistry Textbook


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#1 jrgpots

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 10:32 PM

I have never taken a glaze calculation course. Those of you who teach college/university glaze chemistry or have taken such a course, what texts do you like best? I want to do my own home study.

Jed

#2 Biglou13

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 01:39 AM



I really need to get a ceramics chemistry text book at this point any suggestions?

"The Magic of Fire" book that comes with the Level II version of Insight glaze calc software. Plus the online tutorials that teach you how to use Insight. Plus having Insight (free time limited download) and learing what iot does and how to use it. And a copy of the latest (last) version of Daniel Rhodes "Clay and Galzes for the Potter" updated by Robin Hopper (which is out of print and now expensive... but a GREAT intro book).

best,

................john
From another post. Jb....... Still teaches college level....
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#3 JBaymore

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 08:36 AM

Thanks for the quote Biglou. :)

 

I ALSO use a lot of my own handouts for that course to supplement the various books.  And of course there are in class lectures and discussions.  And LOTS of testing lab work.  THAT is the key to learning about this.  Understand basic scinetific method and then ......test, test, test.

 

But for self-study, you can't beat those two I mentioned.

 

And I STRONGLY reccommned getting the Level II version of Insight (and using the video tutorials to learn to use it).  The Level II gives you access to online info on the Digtitalfire website that goes WAY beyond what is avilable for free.  And the free stuff is great too.

 

best,

 

......................john


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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#4 jrgpots

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:49 AM

Thanks for the quote Biglou. :)

I ALSO use a lot of my own handouts for that course to supplement the various books. And of course there are in class lectures and discussions. And LOTS of testing lab work. THAT is the key to learning about this. Understand basic scinetific method and then ......test, test, test.

But for self-study, you can't beat those two I mentioned.

And I STRONGLY reccommned getting the Level II version of Insight (and using the video tutorials to learn to use it). The Level II gives you access to online info on the Digtitalfire website that goes WAY beyond what is avilable for free. And the free stuff is great too.

best,

......................john

I have read through and viewed the free stuff at digifire/Insight many time and have wanted to get level II. I guess it,s time to fish instead of cutting bait.

John do you have a syllabus or course outline I could purchase? I am willing to sign a confidentiality agreement not to sell it, use for any other purpose other than personal learning. If I lived in your area, I,d enroll!
I don't want to step on any toes so......

Jed

#5 Biglou13

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 08:53 PM

ronin without master

 

 

students without teachers.....


Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#6 jrgpots

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 11:33 PM

ronin without master


students without teachers.....

....Kind of feels like "Grasshopper" in the original series of Kung Fu....standing out in the rain in front of the monastery, hoping to be trained.....lol

#7 JBaymore

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 08:47 AM

Jed,

 

Not something that I'd want to do...... and even maybe gets into potential "relationship issues" with my college.  I try to help here however I can.

 

best,

 

.................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#8 jrgpots

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 02:51 PM

That's ok. I will enroll in a class called "ceramics technologies" for spring semester at Dixie State University...a good place to start...Back to school I go.

Jed

#9 PeterH

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 04:33 AM

jrgpots,

 

You might also want to look at the late Ian Currie's magnificent book Stoneware Glazes.

The first half of the book discusses glaze theory, testing and test-tile preparation. The

second half does a tour of a wide range of classical glazes. The book is long out of print,

but can be seen online at http://stonewareglazes.currie.to/

 

The Currie grid -- showing the effect of varying alumina and silica while keeping fluxes

constant -- is Ian's addition to the usual range of test layouts (e.g. line-blend & triaxial).

Examples can be seen at http://tinyurl.com/nwa2hs8

... click once to enlarge an image, and a second time to see it full-size.

 

Regards, Peter

 

A long discussion on the use of Currie grids to explore a rutile glaze is given in

http://tinyurl.com/o4x8a82 An example grid showing the effect of varying only

alumina and silica is at http://tinyurl.com/qekqjfw

 

This discussion identifies glazes by number within the grid, here is the key:

http://tinyurl.com/p2x8f24

 



#10 TJR

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 12:47 PM

 

ronin without master


students without teachers.....

....Kind of feels like "Grasshopper" in the original series of Kung Fu....standing out in the rain in front of the monastery, hoping to be trained.....lol

 

Don't take the food until the Master has eaten first. It's amazing what you can learn from watching T.V.

TJR.



#11 TJR

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 12:51 PM

I like John Britt's "High Fire Glazes"

Good visually with lotsof colour examples and recipes.

You don't say what cone you are firing to.

TJR.



#12 jrgpots

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 05:04 PM

electric cone 6 oxidation, gas cone 10 oxidation and reduction ( when I finish my gas kiln project).

 

Peter H, thanks for the texts, liturature searches.

 

TJR, didn't know if anyone was going to get a reference to an old TV show....I like  the work of John Britt.  I have checked his book from interlibrary loans in the past. 

 

It's cool that he will add his two cents in the forum every once in a while.  At least I think it is the same John Britt..........I am so bad with names, I might have just put my foot in my mouth....We will see.  

 

 

Jed



#13 Biglou13

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 07:29 PM

"When you can take the pebble from my hand..... It will be time for you to leave".

Hey aren't you making flutes.... (Same show reference)

I scanned through Rhodes/ hopper book. A little short on clay chemistry. But it's tons more info than I had to start with.
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The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#14 jrgpots

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 08:27 PM

Yes I am making flutes and my last three look great.  And they sing great too.  I may put a pic up in my gallery.  Thanks for remembering.

 BTW, I just located a clay mine about 45 minutes from my house.  It's an old BLM mine claim. It produces a very plastic stoneware clay that needs very little working/ adjustments.  I'm getting the directions tomorrow so this weekend I can go MINING!   Now that sounds cool....I slaked down some bentonite/ kaolinite last night that I also found close to the house.

 

I'll look into Rhodes/Hopper book.

 

Jed



#15 Biglou13

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 03:50 AM

I'm excited about your clay.

I'm saying the I'm using epk is local since it's mined locally. (Less than hour) But it's technically commercial

I've. Found some from what I've been told, silty organic clay deposits that the indigenous Indians once used. From what John says sounds somewhat bizen like. I need to get permission to dig.
Caution big brother is watching.
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The middle of the road is boring

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