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The Calico Glazing Mystery

glaze single-fire calico glaze mystery

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#1 John255

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 06:39 PM

Attached File  1-IMG_0549.jpg   102.97KB   10 downloadsAttached File  2-IMG_0550.jpg   113.38KB   4 downloadsAttached File  3-IMG_0551.jpg   110.9KB   3 downloadsAttached File  4-IMG_0552.jpg   98.17KB   2 downloadsAttached File  5-IMG_0553.jpg   115.37KB   3 downloadsAttached File  6-IMG_0554.jpg   118.98KB   2 downloadsAttached File  7-IMG_0555.jpg   150.85KB   0 downloadsAttached File  8-IMG_0557.jpg   150.21KB   2 downloads

 

In the late 70's I was out in Seattle and stumbled upon this lovely pot in a gallery. I was completely puzzeled by how the beautiful four glazes could have been applied in abstract pattern.  There are no overlaps.  I bought it for $20 and got the makers card that read "Charles Rothschild, Barlow Pottery, Sandy Oregon."

 

I wrote Charles a letter saying how much I admired the pot and asked about the glazes and how they were applied.  In a couple months I received a nice letter telling me about a take-off on Shaners Red, and the white being Rhodes basic #32 white, etc. all fired to cone 9 reduction, and not a word about how they were applied.  I wrote again and never had a reply. 

 

About once a year since then I take the pot in hand and try to figure out.  It's hard to believe each  pour would be waxed to protect from next pour?  The piece appears to be slab made which again would add to the time cost.   It does appear to be single-fired because the lid cut divides the glaze pattern as shown in photo 1.  Could this be an early laser cutting?  Photo 7. also shows a perfect cut- back which points to being done after glazing at leather-hard.

 

Anyway some of you old timers out there (not the Old Lady please!) may know the potter and/or the process, and would like to share your ideas.  Hope you find the puzzle interesting.

John255


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#2 Bob Coyle

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 06:52 PM

My guess on the first piece is that the bisked piece was painted with a few lines of wax resist and the different glazes painted between the lines. The others might be just one glaze over the other. Possible multiple firings with some areas left unglazed between firings.



#3 John255

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 07:02 PM

Bob,

That was quick!

I like your idea of multiple firings.

However, with the pot at $20 he probably got $10 , and time cost comes into the formula?

John255


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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 07:21 PM

This piece is done all at one time I feel-bisqued 1st.

Hand built from slabs

This process was popular back then-it takes some time to build these and you just do not see this as much anymore-just like slab build rectangle butterdishes-I'm asked for them almost at every show-who makes them anymore??.

As far as glazing its poured (could be some brush as well) and waxed (sponge or brush)could also have a dip

Its not a multi fire process simple and easy .

These are all old school tried and true glazes fired in reduction atmoshere-I was using some of these glazes back then.

Modern multi glazing looks more like this on porcelain.

Mark


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#5 John255

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 08:05 PM

Glad to have your opinion Mark.

I think you are right in the piece being slab, and in the pouring.  Hard to believe he could put that much time in them and come out.

What may not come through too well in the photos is the glazes in Charles' pot are clearly not layered, as they are in your modern photo. 

John255


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#6 Chris Campbell

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 08:13 PM

This reminds me of Wayne Higby's work from the same time frame. Same color palette but a little looser. I would guess a thrown and altered closed pot ... not that time consuming to make once you have the technique ... 'Fired in reduction' would widen the scope of color possibilities in the glaze color results. Some of those glazes could have been applied with a nice fat brush in an expert hand without any need to mask anything else. I would credit him with graceful gestures and lots of experience. Nice work.

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#7 Mark C.

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:50 PM

I'm pouring and layering mostly now but you can pour the 1st glaze and one other then brush the in between all without waxing.

I do a reduction red glaze with a brush then cover with wax completely without getting the bisque ware waxed then pour the black glaze and blot the drops.

These two black and red glazes are pretty sharp edges next to one another. This takes time in my normal glaze a kiln load day. This is one brushed and one poured as the design is much more intricate than your pot but just two glazes.

I'm sticking to my above post on possibilities of technique.Like she said above fat brush reduction-no problem.

Mark


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#8 John255

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 08:36 AM

Oh yes, Wayne Higby.

 I forgot about his work, with his wonderful landscapes.

There is some resemblance:

http://www.craftinam.../story_258.php?

The poured suggestions with brushed fill-in sounds about right, but there has to be a trick yet to be discovered.

When holding the pice in hand Chris' suggestion of skill and lots of experience ring true.

Thank you very much guys for the comments.

John255


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#9 John255

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

What if the four glazes were poured, brushed, and commingled into abstract pattern on waxed paper and then the pot slowly rolled through?  Would that not be quicker and easier to manage than using resist on vertical surfaces?  I've not tried it, but only throwing the idea out to the group to kibitz.  The photo gives a rough idea of how it could be done.

John255

 

 

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