Jump to content


Photo

How important is a "signature/mark" to be on ceramic work? | May 7, 2013


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Carolyn Dorr

Carolyn Dorr

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 135 posts
  • LocationColumbus, Ohio

Posted 07 May 2013 - 12:56 PM

How important is a "signature/mark" to be on your work?
Do you even have a mark? Are you consistent?


This is an interesting question that I am sure will receive lots of responses. I am looking forward to hearing everyone's opinion.
Carolyn Dorr
Potters Council
www.potterscouncil.org

#2 highonfire

highonfire

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:23 PM

How important is a "signature/mark" to be on your work?
Do you even have a mark? Are you consistent?


This is an interesting question that I am sure will receive lots of responses. I am looking forward to hearing everyone's opinion.


One of my favorite pieces of pottery, a honey pot, has been in my family for many many years...It was salt fired made in Pennsylvania and has the year and a stamp from what pottery it came from. It has always been special but I remember looking at the stamp on the bottom as a kid and gave it more meaning somehow. I struggle with signing my pots and am really inconsistent with it... but I think it is important and it gives more of a personal touch whether its a stamp or a signature

#3 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,189 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 07 May 2013 - 03:00 PM

Why wouldn't you sign it? You made it. I sign everything, unless I am too tired and wax the bottom before I remember the signature. I sign with a brush and cobalt pigment, or iron oxide. I used a "chop" for a while. People asked for a signature.
TJR.

#4 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,975 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 07 May 2013 - 06:00 PM

How important is a "signature/mark" to be on your work?
Do you even have a mark? Are you consistent?


This is an interesting question that I am sure will receive lots of responses. I am looking forward to hearing everyone's opinion.


Having taught for 36 years, having a signature on art work of any sort was extremely important to me! Imagine trying to grade 150 drawings over a weekend, with 30 unsigned! In the studio, I believe it is just as important. Maybe some people out there don't care if their coffee mug is signed, but my signature on my pieces is a stamp of approval. I signed the piece to raise it to the status of "worthy". To not sign to me is an indication that the work does not matter or that I am not proud of it. Now whether you use a chop, a signature or both, doesn't matter the result is the same.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 Evelyne Schoenmann

Evelyne Schoenmann

    Ceramic Artist

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 221 posts
  • LocationSwitzerland and Italy

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:37 PM

Yes, I sign every piece with my initials and the year I done the piece. Mostly I scratch the initials into the clay with a needle or paint it on with iron oxide. Always on the bottom of the piece.

Evelyne Schoenmann
Studio: schoenmann ceramics
In love with alternative firing methods
www.schoenmann-ceramics.ch


#6 Red Herring

Red Herring

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 09 May 2013 - 11:08 AM


How important is a "signature/mark" to be on your work?
Do you even have a mark? Are you consistent?


This is an interesting question that I am sure will receive lots of responses. I am looking forward to hearing everyone's opinion.


One of my favorite pieces of pottery, a honey pot, has been in my family for many many years...It was salt fired made in Pennsylvania and has the year and a stamp from what pottery it came from. It has always been special but I remember looking at the stamp on the bottom as a kid and gave it more meaning somehow. I struggle with signing my pots and am really inconsistent with it... but I think it is important and it gives more of a personal touch whether its a stamp or a signature



#7 Red Herring

Red Herring

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 09 May 2013 - 11:14 AM

It is only important as a marketing tool. I agree that signitures and marks can be interesting as a visual element, but beyond that they have little meaning. It is the buyer or the client that usually finds value in a signiture so they can add value to their "collectable". Hamada didn't sign his work and when asked about this he said jokingly the good pots would always be atributed to him. Like I say it can be a valuable marketing tool so from that point of veiw I beleive it has value.

#8 larryinalabama

larryinalabama

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 09 May 2013 - 01:35 PM

Is there any type of "metal" stamp simliar to a rubber that could be used? I have some metal number and letter stamps that are used for engine work, I thought Id try to use those. A real fancy stamp would be nice.

#9 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 09 May 2013 - 03:57 PM

Many of the pots in my collection were made by people I know. Their signatures or marks are a nice added touch and show pride in their work. Guests often want to talk about various pieces and look for signatures. For the pieces made by people I do not know, I enjoy knowing who made those pots, and I almost always go online and get information about the potter and their work. Anonymous pots may be just as beautiful, but I miss having that extra, personal information.

I sign my pieces and have begun using a small code for the date and type of clay. I am looking for a chop design and would love to get a signature stamp.

If you don't sign your pots, how are the folks on Antiques Roadshow going to identify them in 200 years?
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#10 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,975 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 10 May 2013 - 08:53 AM

Is there any type of "metal" stamp simliar to a rubber that could be used? I have some metal number and letter stamps that are used for engine work, I thought Id try to use those. A real fancy stamp would be nice.


I use and old metal letter stamp from "press days". It is an Old English "R". fits my work well.However I do soften the formality of that with my own signature.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users