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Cone 6 recipes... firing to cone 5


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#1 Marge

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 06:58 PM

I've been looking for cone 5 recipes to start making my own glazes. I've been firing to cone 5 (oxidation) using commercial brush glazes. I want to start dipping. It seems that there are many cone 6 recipes, but not cone 5. Do I need to just start firing to cone 6, or can I use cone 6 glazes and just fire to cone 5? Also, I accidentally just posted a slip question on the "in the studio" forum vs the "glaze" forum. Also a recipe question... Thanks!

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 07:13 PM

Your Cone 6 glazes will be under fired at Cone 5.
You need to fire glazes at the temperatures they are designed for or put up with them not looking right. : > )

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#3 OffCenter

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 07:22 PM

I've been looking for cone 5 recipes to start making my own glazes. I've been firing to cone 5 (oxidation) using commercial brush glazes. I want to start dipping. It seems that there are many cone 6 recipes, but not cone 5. Do I need to just start firing to cone 6, or can I use cone 6 glazes and just fire to cone 5? Also, I accidentally just posted a slip question on the "in the studio" forum vs the "glaze" forum. Also a recipe question... Thanks!


Consider firing to cone 6 instead of 5. The difference is so little that most cone 5 glazes look fine or maybe even better fired to cone 6. Usually, glazes look better over fired than under fired. Obviously, there is a chance that even that little over firing may make a glaze run so take precautions for that. Like most things in ceramics, the only way to find out is to test.

Jim
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#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 06:21 AM

I agree with Chris and Jim. You need to fire the glaze to the correct temperature. I have recipes posted in my gallery with pictures.
There are many good ^6 recipes out there. Firing schedules are critical for success. Read about soaking and down firing.

Marcia

#5 John255

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 03:16 PM

I've been looking for cone 5 recipes to start making my own glazes. I've been firing to cone 5 (oxidation) using commercial brush glazes. I want to start dipping. It seems that there are many cone 6 recipes, but not cone 5. Do I need to just start firing to cone 6, or can I use cone 6 glazes and just fire to cone 5? Also, I accidentally just posted a slip question on the "in the studio" forum vs the "glaze" forum. Also a recipe question... Thanks!


Marge,
There can be a significant difference in the melt and surface appearance when firing a cone 5 glaze it to cone 6.
First the temperature between Orton large cone numbers is not linear.
There is a 65deg difference between large cone 5 and 6.
This has caused Orton to develop and now supply cone 5-1/2.
If you are firing with a kiln sitter you will find a difference between the sitter cone and the witness cone on the shelf.

The rate of firing also makes a significant difference in cone bending temperature.
The clay body the glaze is applied to will make the most visible difference.
Most of these details are never mentioned with glaze formulas.
You can find a lot of good firing info on the Orton website.
http://www.ortoncera...art_degreeF.pdf
Good luck,
John255







John255




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