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Refractory bricks (used)


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 10:25 PM

I have dreams of building brick kiln.
New bricks run $4 to $8 a brick
I recently found some used refractory bricks for sale fairly cheap.
Questions:
How do I determine if brick is refractory grade?
What is going rate for said used bricks?

Thanks
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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 01:31 AM

I have dreams of building brick kiln.
New bricks run $4 to $8 a brick
I recently found some used refractory bricks for sale fairly cheap.
Questions:
How do I determine if brick is refractory grade?
What is going rate for said used bricks?

Thanks


Are you speaking about hard Bricks (heavy) or soft insulating bricks (lighter)
A good book like Olsens The Kiln Book has some good brick info in it-its best to study up on the types and become familiar with all bricks
Soft bricks are made and sold by K factor like K23s k25 or K 26 or k28 -(they used to be sold in cases of 24 or 25-now its 12 to the case for most)
which relates to temps 2300 or 2500 or 2800-As the k's go up the density goes down and the bricks are heavier and hold up better but insulate a bit less
There are usually no makers marks on soft bricks
Hard bricks are rated as well but only known brands (makers markes) or new bricks will you be able to know what that rating is.
Many of the hard bricks I grew up with are now long gone . Brands like Carnagie or Jbfine or ap green Clippers or stocktons-are no longer available at least on the west coast -maybe still around back east?
A newer brand is Banner in hard bricks from the east
Most Hard bricks will have a name stamped on them new or used.Some are super duty or high alumina content (good in salt kilns)
Read up on these differeances before buying any.
The color will also at least with hard bricks tell you if they are high fire.
Fireplace or chimmney bricks are usually unstamped and slightly irregular and non standard size and made a bit sloppy and of a little different color(they will crack and not hold up at cone high temps)-that being standard hard bricks are 2 1/2 inches thick x 4 x9 inches exactly. If the ones you have found are not stamped and are slighly iregulair I would only consider them for the top part of a chimmney.
High fire Bricks are one of my favorite collected items and I have many a pile. New and used.Never had too many.
I like a soft brick inside and Hard brick outside kiln for looks.
Cost will depend on type and condition??????

Mark
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#3 perkolator

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 12:25 PM

Like Mark said, true firebricks for kilns and furnaces will be marked/stamped whereas a regular house brick/fireplace brick will most likely not be marked. Best thing might be to take a pic of what you're looking at and post it up so feedback can be had.

as for new bricks on the West coast, ANH Refractories(was Harbison-Walker) in Richmond still has "clipper" bricks available - they are roughly $4/ea for a standard 2.5x9x4 hard brick. soaps and splits are around $6/ea. they also carry different grades and these are regularly stocked items.

It's not too often that I've personally seen a bunch of kiln bricks for sale, but when I do they are usually a minimum of $2/ea to give an idea of what they usually run used.

#4 Essaily

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:30 PM

I'm also making a little kiln and my own refractory bricks. A pizza oven maker did a test on several brick recipes and found that 40%-50% grog and 50%-6o% fireclay made fairly durable heat resistant and thermal shock resistant bricks. These recipes are also used for raku ware I noticed!

Attached File  clay - squish.jpg   34.57KB   26 downloads

#5 DAY

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 07:57 AM

I have a "bunch" of unused brick. They have been stacked outside for about 10 years; I assume with some pressure washing they would be like new again. Most are unmarked, some have 2W clearly stamped, and a name that is _RUZITE_ _ _. Any ideas of what they are?

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#6 Biglou13

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 08:27 AM

I have a "bunch" of unused brick. They have been stacked outside for about 10 years; I assume with some pressure washing they would be like new again. Most are unmarked, some have 2W clearly stamped, and a name that is _RUZITE_ _ _. Any ideas of what they are?


Nice looks like assortment of shapes including arch pieces. Are they refractory? Found this website http://bricknames.com. Any history where they are from.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#7 Biglou13

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 08:44 AM

I'm also making a little kiln and my own refractory bricks. A pizza oven maker did a test on several brick recipes and found that 40%-50% grog and 50%-6o% fireclay made fairly durable heat resistant and thermal shock resistant bricks. These recipes are also used for raku ware I noticed!

Attached File  clay - squish.jpg   34.57KB   26 downloads


I think it's super cool your making bricks and kiln

I'm questioning testing procedure in relation to kiln/refractory bricks a blow torch does not reflect the same conditions of a kiln.

I also,have thought of making bricks. Please keep us updated on progress.

Just thinking. A kiln is needed to fire bricks (fire/refractory), fire bricks are needed to make kiln ............ Which came first the chicken or the egg?............
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#8 dave the potter

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 11:23 AM

W-2 are #2 wedge bricks. They are tapered down the 9" measurement and are meant to form an arch 9" thick. Arch brick are tapered in the 4.5" direction and are used to form a 4.5" thick arch.

#9 JBaymore

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 03:34 PM

I have a "bunch" of unused brick. They have been stacked outside for about 10 years; I assume with some pressure washing they would be like new again. Most are unmarked, some have 2W clearly stamped, and a name that is _RUZITE_ _ _. Any ideas of what they are?




They are Kruzite. A.P. Green product. Very good bricks if unused....Super Duty, high alumina. Often used in slagging environments like steel and otehr metal furnaces as well as glass furnaces. If used.... they may or may not have had some "life" taken out of them.

best,

.....................john
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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#10 Mark C.

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 06:12 PM

Those Kruzite can be great bricks-I sold a 1000 of those 9 inch wedge like in your photo back in the 70s to a guy in Alturas Ca.
My salt kiln area around kiln has some from a 40 foot diameter rotating lime kiln-they are 4 1/2 x 9x9 and where coated with slag -you can see them in the 4th photo around kiln area.

http://ceramicartsda...#38;#entry18381

Are you planning on using those bricks?
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 06:32 PM

High alumina bricks are perfect for soda kilns. Looks like you have enough to build one. I have the AP Green manual for arch bricks. If you need the onto on building arches with those 9 inch brick. The tables are for 4.5" or 9" bricks plus straights and tell you what you need for some many inches of rise/ft. and for different spans.
I have used this for many kilns I have built over the years.

Marcia

#12 Lewis Kiln Development

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 11:08 PM


I'm also making a little kiln and my own refractory bricks. A pizza oven maker did a test on several brick recipes and found that 40%-50% grog and 50%-6o% fireclay made fairly durable heat resistant and thermal shock resistant bricks. These recipes are also used for raku ware I noticed!

Attached File  clay - squish.jpg   34.57KB   26 downloads


I think it's super cool your making bricks and kiln

I'm questioning testing procedure in relation to kiln/refractory bricks a blow torch does not reflect the same conditions of a kiln.

I also,have thought of making bricks. Please keep us updated on progress.

Just thinking. A kiln is needed to fire bricks (fire/refractory), fire bricks are needed to make kiln ............ Which came first the chicken or the egg?............


You are very correct. The method for testing a refractory is very involved. I research them very extensively (ceramic engineering student concentrating in refractories at Alfred) . While your composition is refractory in terms of resistance to heat, it is not suitable for building a kiln. If you would like a primarily clay composition refractory that is cheap, look into different castable recipes. There are many online.




#13 DAY

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 09:19 AM

Those Kruzite can be great bricks-I sold a 1000 of those 9 inch wedge like in your photo back in the 70s to a guy in Alturas Ca.
My salt kiln area around kiln has some from a 40 foot diameter rotating lime kiln-they are 4 1/2 x 9x9 and where coated with slag -you can see them in the 4th photo around kiln area.

http://ceramicartsda...amp;#entry18381

Are you planning on using those bricks?
Mark


Thanks for the info!
No immediate plans, so I guess they are for sale- I got them along with the property.
Here's a photo of two bricks that were not stored outside. No markings that i can detect. They are 2x4.5x9
And there are these "shelves" that I have no idea of what they are. Agin, any help appreciated.

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