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How to glaze fire in a manual kiln?


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#1 CPT

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:09 AM

Hi!!!

I will be doing some test pieces soon. I'm pretty new to this and unsure of how to go about it. I already have a few pieces that I made using Amaco 480 mid/high fire clay.

Now I want to try using some of the Potter's Choice glazes (layering, etc). I am really excited about using these glazes on my test pieces!

How would I use my manual kiln to do this? I have 3 switches (Low, Medium, High)and cones ready. How long for each L-M-H setting to get the right effects/oxidation for these particular glazes?

Attached are some images.

Thanks so much in advance!

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#2 Lucille Oka

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

What are you new to? Testing, ceramics, glazing which?
John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#3 CPT

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:36 PM

Just new to using the Pottery's Choice glazes. Haven't really used them yet in my manual kiln :)

#4 Bill T.

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:53 PM

I have used most of them quite successfully. Read carefully several times Amaco's instructions for application and follow them. I brush with a thick fan brush to really lay down a good application. Here is an example of the Indigo Float, 3 heavy coats. Did not run. Sorry can't help with the kiln as mine in computer controlled. BTW this glaze will accept Cone 5 - 6.

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#5 Lucille Oka

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:46 PM

Before I began testing these glazes I read every brochure Amaco offered as to brushing techniques, firing temperatures, how many coats, and the potential results. I looked at all of the brochures under sunlight, northern light, incandescent light, photofloods and online at the Amaco website.

After looking I decided on what layering combinations thrilled me the most and what glazes I wanted to test. I wrote them down in a notebook leaving room for notes on the glaze application, firing data and the results of the glazes.

I made flat test tiles, textured propped tiles and small test vessels with textured areas and bisque fired them to a mature cone 04-1971°F.

I purchased similar brushes that Amaco used for the glaze application. I purchased all of the Potter’s Choice glaze selections. Some of the color choices required buying more than one jar.

I read the label on each glaze jar as I prepared to use it. I applied the glaze according to label instructions. I fired the tests to cone 5-2205°F. The range for these glazes is Cone 5-6 or 2205°F-2269°F

How this translates into a manual kiln is to look at the temperatures recommended and you purchase your junior cones for the KilnSitter accordingly. You step up the temperature the way you normally do in a glaze fire.


Remember never to exceed the temperature limitations of your kiln. Never leave your kiln unattended while firing especially near the end of the firing. Allow the kiln to cool down completely to room temperature. This is very important and even then prop open the lid after that for awhile.

Use some self-supporting pyrometric cones so you can get an idea of what’s happening in the kiln during your test firing; and realize these are tests.

After seeing the results of the larger Ancient Jasper test. I bought a gallon jug of it. WOW!

This week I received the new brochures#11744E Rev 8/12 and 11727N with Temmoku as the base coat.

I used Amaco #65 Porcelain.
This post took awhile to compose and edit so that it would not be confusing.
I hope this helps.

John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#6 Pres

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:59 AM

Before I began testing these glazes I read every brochure Amaco offered as to brushing techniques, firing temperatures, how many coats, and the potential results. I looked at all of the brochures under sunlight, northern light, incandescent light, photofloods and online at the Amaco website.

After looking I decided on what layering combinations thrilled me the most and what glazes I wanted to test. I wrote them down in a notebook leaving room for notes on the glaze application, firing data and the results of the glazes.

I made flat test tiles, textured propped tiles and small test vessels with textured areas and bisque fired them to a mature cone 04-1971°F.

I purchased similar brushes that Amaco used for the glaze application. I purchased all of the Potter’s Choice glaze selections. Some of the color choices required buying more than one jar.

I read the label on each glaze jar as I prepared to use it. I applied the glaze according to label instructions. I fired the tests to cone 5-2205°F. The range for these glazes is Cone 5-6 or 2205°F-2269°F

How this translates into a manual kiln is to look at the temperatures recommended and you purchase your junior cones for the KilnSitter accordingly. You step up the temperature the way you normally do in a glaze fire.


Remember never to exceed the temperature limitations of your kiln. Never leave your kiln unattended while firing especially near the end of the firing. Allow the kiln to cool down completely to room temperature. This is very important and even then prop open the lid after that for awhile.

Use some self-supporting pyrometric cones so you can get an idea of what’s happening in the kiln during your test firing; and realize these are tests.

After seeing the results of the larger Ancient Jasper test. I bought a gallon jug of it. WOW!

This week I received the new brochures#11744E Rev 8/12 and 11727N with Temmoku as the base coat.

I used Amaco #65 Porcelain.
This post took awhile to compose and edit so that it would not be confusing.
I hope this helps.


Looking at your set up, it looks like you do have a kiln setter unlike mine that does not. Makes it easier to fire to the cones, however witness cones in different areas in the kiln will help you figure how even your firing is and in the future where to place things. I have found that placement is important, especially with a variety of glazes. All to often one glaze will be a nice eggshell at 5.5, and more glossy at 6.2 or 5. I really pay attention to placement. At the same time, if you pay attention to your temperature rise you can get a bit of a soak at cone 5-6 to even things out in the kiln and to get a better glaze surface. I use a visual color chart to help me with color temperatures in the kiln. Not perfect, but helpful. good luck.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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