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#41 TJR

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 11:53 AM

TJR and Pres, I may have to inquire about lab fees with my administrators. But, as I may have mentioned, the state has been putting a kibosh to most of that. They say that, if it part of the expected course work, you can't make them pay for it.

TJR, you had four hundred stolen? That's terrible. It's too bad you can't trust the students anymore. But that's one reason I don't let the kids near my desk without permission. That way, if something happens, the list of suspects is short.


Benzine;
Like, Pres., Ive been doing it for a long time. The sad thing about losing that money was the cheques, which the thief could not cash and I could not get back. I knew which class it was, and I even think I knew the student as he ducked out early. Lesson learned. I worked at an inner city high school for 12 years-the toughest school in the division. The city seemed to subsidize that area because of the economic situation. So, not every school charges fees, but many programs such as band, art, phys-ed all rely on these monies. The cost for football team equipment is very high.
I could go on and on, but I won't. In an ideal world, there would be no extra fees. And all the birds would lay soft-boiled eggs.
TJR.:lol:

#42 Pres

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 10:02 PM


TJR and Pres, I may have to inquire about lab fees with my administrators. But, as I may have mentioned, the state has been putting a kibosh to most of that. They say that, if it part of the expected course work, you can't make them pay for it.

TJR, you had four hundred stolen? That's terrible. It's too bad you can't trust the students anymore. But that's one reason I don't let the kids near my desk without permission. That way, if something happens, the list of suspects is short.


Benzine;
Like, Pres., Ive been doing it for a long time. The sad thing about losing that money was the cheques, which the thief could not cash and I could not get back. I knew which class it was, and I even think I knew the student as he ducked out early. Lesson learned. I worked at an inner city high school for 12 years-the toughest school in the division. The city seemed to subsidize that area because of the economic situation. So, not every school charges fees, but many programs such as band, art, phys-ed all rely on these monies. The cost for football team equipment is very high.
I could go on and on, but I won't. In an ideal world, there would be no extra fees. And all the birds would lay soft-boiled eggs.
TJR.:lol:



Part of the expected work. If it were part of the required work it may be a different story. However, the art classes were elected by the student to fill out their course requirements in the arts. They could take a course that did not have a lab fee such as Art 2, or other arts and humanities courses to complete those requirement. The lab fee was included in the Course Selection booklet that all students took home to flesh our their schedules for the next year so there were no surprises. Yes in and ideal world, there would be no fees, but lets be realistic there is a greater community following for the sports than there is for the arts, and at the same time a greater following for the band because it is icing on the half time. Real world real realities.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#43 Natania

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 09:44 AM

I teach HS art and ceramics and I've been following this thread with interest (even the little squabble about spelling. My opinion on that is that this forum is akin to a casual conversation. Would one criticize another's grammar in casual conversation, or would one be focusing on the point the other is making? Also, some people may be good with words but not with letters. Does that really take away from their excellent ideas and the content of their contributions? But I digress). I think the idea of teaching five ceramic classes of 35 students each sounds insane, even if one is highly qualified. I have a lot of experience in ceramics and in teaching it, and storing and firing 175 different students' projects has me quaking in my dust covered boots, never mind ordering, storing and keeping track of materials, dust and safety issues, and mess. Is this really a one-person job? It seems to me that this is a task that requires a helper of some kind at least. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I work at a private school with small classes, and I can barely find time to mix glazes from raw materials. How does one find the time to do that? (Any jealously you may be feeling right now would quickly evaporate if you were to get a glimpse at my paycheck). We are expected to be involved in a lot of other things and give much individual student attendion, so I still find myself staying late at school and not getting to the glazes. Any advice? I'd like to have shop glazes as I think the results would be more authentic and unique....



#44 TJR

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:39 AM

I teach HS art and ceramics and I've been following this thread with interest (even the little squabble about spelling. My opinion on that is that this forum is akin to a casual conversation. Would one criticize another's grammar in casual conversation, or would one be focusing on the point the other is making? Also, some people may be good with words but not with letters. Does that really take away from their excellent ideas and the content of their contributions? But I digress). I think the idea of teaching five ceramic classes of 35 students each sounds insane, even if one is highly qualified. I have a lot of experience in ceramics and in teaching it, and storing and firing 175 different students' projects has me quaking in my dust covered boots, never mind ordering, storing and keeping track of materials, dust and safety issues, and mess. Is this really a one-person job? It seems to me that this is a task that requires a helper of some kind at least. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I work at a private school with small classes, and I can barely find time to mix glazes from raw materials. How does one find the time to do that? (Any jealously you may be feeling right now would quickly evaporate if you were to get a glimpse at my paycheck). We are expected to be involved in a lot of other things and give much individual student attendion, so I still find myself staying late at school and not getting to the glazes. Any advice? I'd like to have shop glazes as I think the results would be more authentic and unique....


Bianca;
This is an old thread, but I still feel that I can respond. I just won the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year award.[Comes with a cheque of $1000.00!].
Anyway, everyone knows that class sizes of upwards of 35 are insane! A class of 25-26 is doable, any more and you are just babysitting. I have gone in the past to the principal and protested class sizes of 30. I don't think they would dare put 35 in my room.
On the question of glazing, I used to mix coloured slips and we would decorate on leather hard. After bisquing, I would dip glaze in a bucket of cone 04 clear that I also mixed up in my studio. Now that I have been doing it for 27 years, I buy commercial glazes. You can get reds and oranges which I couldn't provide, and the students are happier, as slips are dull until they are fired.
On spelling-I am Canadian. We spell a lot of words differently up here, like coloured, and theatre.
Nuff said, Tom

#45 trina

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 12:09 PM


I teach HS art and ceramics and I've been following this thread with interest (even the little squabble about spelling. My opinion on that is that this forum is akin to a casual conversation. Would one criticize another's grammar in casual conversation, or would one be focusing on the point the other is making? Also, some people may be good with words but not with letters. Does that really take away from their excellent ideas and the content of their contributions? But I digress). I think the idea of teaching five ceramic classes of 35 students each sounds insane, even if one is highly qualified. I have a lot of experience in ceramics and in teaching it, and storing and firing 175 different students' projects has me quaking in my dust covered boots, never mind ordering, storing and keeping track of materials, dust and safety issues, and mess. Is this really a one-person job? It seems to me that this is a task that requires a helper of some kind at least. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I work at a private school with small classes, and I can barely find time to mix glazes from raw materials. How does one find the time to do that? (Any jealously you may be feeling right now would quickly evaporate if you were to get a glimpse at my paycheck). We are expected to be involved in a lot of other things and give much individual student attendion, so I still find myself staying late at school and not getting to the glazes. Any advice? I'd like to have shop glazes as I think the results would be more authentic and unique....


Bianca;
This is an old thread, but I still feel that I can respond. I just won the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year award.[Comes with a cheque of $1000.00!].
Anyway, everyone knows that class sizes of upwards of 35 are insane! A class of 25-26 is doable, any more and you are just babysitting. I have gone in the past to the principal and protested class sizes of 30. I don't think they would dare put 35 in my room.
On the question of glazing, I used to mix coloured slips and we would decorate on leather hard. After bisquing, I would dip glaze in a bucket of cone 04 clear that I also mixed up in my studio. Now that I have been doing it for 27 years, I buy commercial glazes. You can get reds and oranges which I couldn't provide, and the students are happier, as slips are dull until they are fired.
On spelling-I am Canadian. We spell a lot of words differently up here, like coloured, and theatre.
Nuff said, Tom


on spelling was that ginch or guanch ;). T

#46 Pres

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 05:40 PM


I teach HS art and ceramics and I've been following this thread with interest (even the little squabble about spelling. My opinion on that is that this forum is akin to a casual conversation. Would one criticize another's grammar in casual conversation, or would one be focusing on the point the other is making? Also, some people may be good with words but not with letters. Does that really take away from their excellent ideas and the content of their contributions? But I digress). I think the idea of teaching five ceramic classes of 35 students each sounds insane, even if one is highly qualified. I have a lot of experience in ceramics and in teaching it, and storing and firing 175 different students' projects has me quaking in my dust covered boots, never mind ordering, storing and keeping track of materials, dust and safety issues, and mess. Is this really a one-person job? It seems to me that this is a task that requires a helper of some kind at least. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I work at a private school with small classes, and I can barely find time to mix glazes from raw materials. How does one find the time to do that? (Any jealously you may be feeling right now would quickly evaporate if you were to get a glimpse at my paycheck). We are expected to be involved in a lot of other things and give much individual student attendion, so I still find myself staying late at school and not getting to the glazes. Any advice? I'd like to have shop glazes as I think the results would be more authentic and unique....


Bianca;
This is an old thread, but I still feel that I can respond. I just won the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year award.[Comes with a cheque of $1000.00!].
Anyway, everyone knows that class sizes of upwards of 35 are insane! A class of 25-26 is doable, any more and you are just babysitting. I have gone in the past to the principal and protested class sizes of 30. I don't think they would dare put 35 in my room.
On the question of glazing, I used to mix coloured slips and we would decorate on leather hard. After bisquing, I would dip glaze in a bucket of cone 04 clear that I also mixed up in my studio. Now that I have been doing it for 27 years, I buy commercial glazes. You can get reds and oranges which I couldn't provide, and the students are happier, as slips are dull until they are fired.
On spelling-I am Canadian. We spell a lot of words differently up here, like coloured, and theatre.
Nuff said, Tom


I fought the fight for many years about the class sizes. In the end, I invited several administrators to come in to my classroom during a 32 student class, and a 22 student class. Next semester all of my classes were limited to 35. Their take was that I never sat in either class, but could not meet with every student during a period where needed. They were surprised at the type of teaching,one on one, that went on in studio class after initial demonstrations were completed. Over the years our class sizes dropped to about 20-22 in the advanced classes and 25-27 in the Art 1. If a teacher is not proactive about these things, most administrators do not have a clue.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#47 TJR

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 06:41 PM



I teach HS art and ceramics and I've been following this thread with interest (even the little squabble about spelling. My opinion on that is that this forum is akin to a casual conversation. Would one criticize another's grammar in casual conversation, or would one be focusing on the point the other is making? Also, some people may be good with words but not with letters. Does that really take away from their excellent ideas and the content of their contributions? But I digress). I think the idea of teaching five ceramic classes of 35 students each sounds insane, even if one is highly qualified. I have a lot of experience in ceramics and in teaching it, and storing and firing 175 different students' projects has me quaking in my dust covered boots, never mind ordering, storing and keeping track of materials, dust and safety issues, and mess. Is this really a one-person job? It seems to me that this is a task that requires a helper of some kind at least. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I work at a private school with small classes, and I can barely find time to mix glazes from raw materials. How does one find the time to do that? (Any jealously you may be feeling right now would quickly evaporate if you were to get a glimpse at my paycheck). We are expected to be involved in a lot of other things and give much individual student attendion, so I still find myself staying late at school and not getting to the glazes. Any advice? I'd like to have shop glazes as I think the results would be more authentic and unique....


Bianca;
This is an old thread, but I still feel that I can respond. I just won the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year award.[Comes with a cheque of $1000.00!].
Anyway, everyone knows that class sizes of upwards of 35 are insane! A class of 25-26 is doable, any more and you are just babysitting. I have gone in the past to the principal and protested class sizes of 30. I don't think they would dare put 35 in my room.
On the question of glazing, I used to mix coloured slips and we would decorate on leather hard. After bisquing, I would dip glaze in a bucket of cone 04 clear that I also mixed up in my studio. Now that I have been doing it for 27 years, I buy commercial glazes. You can get reds and oranges which I couldn't provide, and the students are happier, as slips are dull until they are fired.
On spelling-I am Canadian. We spell a lot of words differently up here, like coloured, and theatre.
Nuff said, Tom


on spelling was that ginch or guanch Posted Image. T


I don't know! Made me laugh, though. Probably guanch as it has more letters.:Psrc="http://ceramicartsda...lt/tongue.gif">
TJR

#48 TJR

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:14 AM

Re class size.
I was at an art opening last night for student art projects called "quantum". A guy came up to me and said;"Are you an art teacher?" I introduced my self and said where I taught. He teaches art in another school division. I knew his school has the largest population of students in the city @ 1800. We have 1340 at my school and we have two full time art teachers, and couild probably use at least another half time person. He said that he is the only art teacher there! I know that back in the day they had 3 full time art teachers! He was shocked,when I told him this. He said he teaches 150 students in seven classes. We cover 14 classes with the two of us.at our school. This means that at his school 1650 students are NOT getting an opportunity to take art. Yes, it is not a compulsory course, but you would think that there would be room for at lest one more art person.
TJR.

#49 Pres

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:32 AM

Re class size.
I was at an art opening last night for student art projects called "quantum". A guy came up to me and said;"Are you an art teacher?" I introduced my self and said where I taught. He teaches art in another school division. I knew his school has the largest population of students in the city @ 1800. We have 1340 at my school and we have two full time art teachers, and couild probably use at least another half time person. He said that he is the only art teacher there! I know that back in the day they had 3 full time art teachers! He was shocked,when I told him this. He said he teaches 150 students in seven classes. We cover 14 classes with the two of us.at our school. This means that at his school 1650 students are NOT getting an opportunity to take art. Yes, it is not a compulsory course, but you would think that there would be room for at lest one more art person.
TJR.


Yes, this sort of thing is happening at a lot of schools. It brings to mind the chicken or the egg. Do you go out and try to drum more students into the program by being proactive, and thus hoping to get more staff to handle students, or do you hide your head in the sand to handle the students you have the best you can. If the schools are holding the budget to a minimum by not adding staff, increasing your class sizes results in less of a quality education for those you have. Big problem for arts educators.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#50 TJR

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 02:15 PM


Re class size.
I was at an art opening last night for student art projects called "quantum". A guy came up to me and said;"Are you an art teacher?" I introduced my self and said where I taught. He teaches art in another school division. I knew his school has the largest population of students in the city @ 1800. We have 1340 at my school and we have two full time art teachers, and couild probably use at least another half time person. He said that he is the only art teacher there! I know that back in the day they had 3 full time art teachers! He was shocked,when I told him this. He said he teaches 150 students in seven classes. We cover 14 classes with the two of us.at our school. This means that at his school 1650 students are NOT getting an opportunity to take art. Yes, it is not a compulsory course, but you would think that there would be room for at lest one more art person.
TJR.


Yes, this sort of thing is happening at a lot of schools. It brings to mind the chicken or the egg. Do you go out and try to drum more students into the program by being proactive, and thus hoping to get more staff to handle students, or do you hide your head in the sand to handle the students you have the best you can. If the schools are holding the budget to a minimum by not adding staff, increasing your class sizes results in less of a quality education for those you have. Big problem for arts educators.


Pres;
Of course you know that I do the former. When I started at my current school nine years ago, the position was 1.5. Then I built it up to 1.7, and now it is at 2.0, and has been for quite a long time. I think think putting your head in the sand helps anyone. Like you, I want to retire in a blaze of glory, with my head held high, and have no regrets.I did feel a bit powerless to help this guy.
TJR.

#51 Pres

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 11:16 PM



Re class size.
I was at an art opening last night for student art projects called "quantum". A guy came up to me and said;"Are you an art teacher?" I introduced my self and said where I taught. He teaches art in another school division. I knew his school has the largest population of students in the city @ 1800. We have 1340 at my school and we have two full time art teachers, and couild probably use at least another half time person. He said that he is the only art teacher there! I know that back in the day they had 3 full time art teachers! He was shocked,when I told him this. He said he teaches 150 students in seven classes. We cover 14 classes with the two of us.at our school. This means that at his school 1650 students are NOT getting an opportunity to take art. Yes, it is not a compulsory course, but you would think that there would be room for at lest one more art person.
TJR.


Yes, this sort of thing is happening at a lot of schools. It brings to mind the chicken or the egg. Do you go out and try to drum more students into the program by being proactive, and thus hoping to get more staff to handle students, or do you hide your head in the sand to handle the students you have the best you can. If the schools are holding the budget to a minimum by not adding staff, increasing your class sizes results in less of a quality education for those you have. Big problem for arts educators.


Pres;
Of course you know that I do the former. When I started at my current school nine years ago, the position was 1.5. Then I built it up to 1.7, and now it is at 2.0, and has been for quite a long time. I think think putting your head in the sand helps anyone. Like you, I want to retire in a blaze of glory, with my head held high, and have no regrets.I did feel a bit powerless to help this guy.
TJR.


No blaze of glory on my part, I went out regretfully, and missed it so much the first few years-I was just having so much damn fun! My Mom had died(long slow death,7yrs), and I figured Dad would need more company at 83. So I retired, Eight months later he remarried! Go figure! She was 66 and a nurse! Now I don't worry about him.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#52 Benzine

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:59 PM

So this topic has risen again. Glad to see it, as I find it quite informative, and just all around fun.


I still can't wrap my head around teaching that many students in a ceramics class. Twenty seven students, was my max in my eight years of teaching, and luckily, it was full of really good students. In contrast, I had a class, with about ten less students, but there were several idiots, who made the class unpleasant. It was not a good combination of students. The majority were good, and I felt sorry that they had to be in the same class, as the few idiots. And the sad thing is, there wasn't much I could do. Separating them did no good, punishment from myself, or the administration, also didn't help. Even talking to parents didn't fix the problem. It's one of those classes, where you are glad to see it end. The funny thing is, one of the more vocal of that bunch, was set to take another class with me later in the year, he dropped it. Without his "buddies" he was nothing. I wish guidance had a filter on their scheduling program, that would keep certain students out of the same class. It would allow the teacher to actually, teach, instead of focusing on the same problem students everyday.

Now, a little bit more positive discussion. Pres, or anyone else, who would like to offer input, I am curious as to how you allotted wheel time to students, and to what you required of them on the wheel?
I've been more or less following the same set up/ requirements, I've been using since I started teaching. Here's what I have done:

My first teaching job, was on a block schedule (ninety minute classes, nine week long terms). Once we got rolling on the first couple hand built projects, I'd take four students at a time (we had four wheels) and they'd be required to work on the potter's wheel for half a class period, each day for a week. They were also required to make at least one project, that met my approval. If they made more than one, I graded their best. After a week was up, a new group would be on the wheel, and this went until towards the end of the term, when we were done with wet clay work. This set up, allowed me to introduce them to the wheel. I had a Ceramics II class, where they would have to make a matching set on the wheel.

In my second teaching job, I was on an eight period a day schedule. I kept the same basic set up, but since the class lasted a semester, I didn't assign students to the wheel, on a weekly schedule. They were just required to create a couple projects, that met my approval. I did require them to trim a foot, whereas I didn't at my first school. The reason? Time and the inclusion of a Griffin Grip at my second school. That just makes, teaching how to trim a bottom, much easier. I still show other techniques, but only required them to use the Grip. I had no Ceramics II class at that school, so I had to fit in as much as I could.

Now, I'm in my third job, which also runs on the block, Thank God! However, there actually was no focused Ceramics class, when I got here. I do believe there used to be, but that's when the department was larger. It used to be a two, or at least one and a half position program, but was dropped to one several years ago. So, when I got here, it was just a Three-Dimensional Art class. Some clay work was taught in it, but the rest of it was basic work with other materials, matte board, wire, and things, that bordered on "Crafty". So I said, "Enough of that" and made the class predominately clay work. We do some plaster work, after we are done with wet clay, but that's about it.
So, as with my first school, each student is on the wheel for about a week. We have five working wheels, with a sixth, that I am getting rid of. It's pretty beat, and takes up too much space. Right now, they only have to make one project, though the majority love, the variety of objects, throwing offers, and make more. Despite that, I'm thinking about changing my set up a bit.
I'm thinking about requiring three projects. The first, they are allowed a decent amount of help from me. For the other two, they are not. At least one must have a pulled handle, and at least one must have a trimmed foot (I'm looking into purchasing a Griffin Grip). Sadly, I do not have a second level, or advanced class for clay work. So much like my second school, I have to fit everything in.
I looked into creating a new pottery class, but there's no room in the schedule, and severe lack in the amount of me. So, that's not going to happen.

So what does everyone think? Any suggestions?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#53 TJR

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 02:46 PM

Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts

#54 Benzine

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:17 PM

Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#55 Pres

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:00 PM


Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.


You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#56 Benzine

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:36 PM



Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.


You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.


Classes, that don't exist? I can't imagine doing something like that.....hehe.... I do "Independent Study" courses, for any subject I teach. The administration hasn't said anything about it yet.
I wished I had a higher level ceramics class I could teach, so I could have the students focus on the wheel, but alas, I don't see that happening. So my best solution, seems to be, cramming in as much as possible. Sadly this means, that I am somewhat tied, to basic forms. I do show examples of more complex, and multi-piece vessels, and I have had students make an attempt at those. I also have students sketch out ideas for their wheel projects, before they start on the wheel. I tell them, that I can't help on the wheel, until I know what they are going form.

I do definitely agree with you, that you can't teach the wheel. I tell the students that, when I'm doing my demo, especially with centering and pulling the clay. It's just something you have to get a feel for, and you can't teach that.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#57 Pres

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:17 AM




Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.


You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.


Classes, that don't exist? I can't imagine doing something like that.....hehe.... I do "Independent Study" courses, for any subject I teach. The administration hasn't said anything about it yet.
I wished I had a higher level ceramics class I could teach, so I could have the students focus on the wheel, but alas, I don't see that happening. So my best solution, seems to be, cramming in as much as possible. Sadly this means, that I am somewhat tied, to basic forms. I do show examples of more complex, and multi-piece vessels, and I have had students make an attempt at those. I also have students sketch out ideas for their wheel projects, before they start on the wheel. I tell them, that I can't help on the wheel, until I know what they are going form.

I do definitely agree with you, that you can't teach the wheel. I tell the students that, when I'm doing my demo, especially with centering and pulling the clay. It's just something you have to get a feel for, and you can't teach that.


Yes "independent Study" covered a lot of good and ills. Our district was going for certification of some sort and had auditors in for nearly everything from class sizes, to budget, to grounds. If it could be quantified, they did it. It did get me the 2nd level class as I said, it also got me a second level of my animation classe. This day and age of budgetary constraints and lack of support when it comes to increases, can be beaten if you strike when the opportunity arises. The adult class helped as the director for Federal Programs was in the class many years, often unallocated money would find its way for equipment. I also had the head of personnel in the class many years. Think these things don't help-think again!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#58 Natania

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 06:24 AM





Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.


You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.


Classes, that don't exist? I can't imagine doing something like that.....hehe.... I do "Independent Study" courses, for any subject I teach. The administration hasn't said anything about it yet.
I wished I had a higher level ceramics class I could teach, so I could have the students focus on the wheel, but alas, I don't see that happening. So my best solution, seems to be, cramming in as much as possible. Sadly this means, that I am somewhat tied, to basic forms. I do show examples of more complex, and multi-piece vessels, and I have had students make an attempt at those. I also have students sketch out ideas for their wheel projects, before they start on the wheel. I tell them, that I can't help on the wheel, until I know what they are going form.

I do definitely agree with you, that you can't teach the wheel. I tell the students that, when I'm doing my demo, especially with centering and pulling the clay. It's just something you have to get a feel for, and you can't teach that.


Yes "independent Study" covered a lot of good and ills. Our district was going for certification of some sort and had auditors in for nearly everything from class sizes, to budget, to grounds. If it could be quantified, they did it. It did get me the 2nd level class as I said, it also got me a second level of my animation classe. This day and age of budgetary constraints and lack of support when it comes to increases, can be beaten if you strike when the opportunity arises. The adult class helped as the director for Federal Programs was in the class many years, often unallocated money would find its way for equipment. I also had the head of personnel in the class many years. Think these things don't help-think again!






I also have my share of independent study students, but really only the one ceramics class. The problem is space, and the studio is tiny. Thus I only have three wheels. I simply require all students to make "something" on the wheel, so even the ones who don't like to get messy will try it. I give regular demos for inspiration (I hope). If I could get a bigger classroom I'd like to get more wheels, and perhaps try a ceramics 2 class, even if it had to be at the same time as 1. Thanks for the posts. They are helpful, as an art teacher's' dilemma often involves getting the most result from the least resources...

#59 Pres

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:33 AM






Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts


Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.


You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.


Classes, that don't exist? I can't imagine doing something like that.....hehe.... I do "Independent Study" courses, for any subject I teach. The administration hasn't said anything about it yet.
I wished I had a higher level ceramics class I could teach, so I could have the students focus on the wheel, but alas, I don't see that happening. So my best solution, seems to be, cramming in as much as possible. Sadly this means, that I am somewhat tied, to basic forms. I do show examples of more complex, and multi-piece vessels, and I have had students make an attempt at those. I also have students sketch out ideas for their wheel projects, before they start on the wheel. I tell them, that I can't help on the wheel, until I know what they are going form.

I do definitely agree with you, that you can't teach the wheel. I tell the students that, when I'm doing my demo, especially with centering and pulling the clay. It's just something you have to get a feel for, and you can't teach that.


Yes "independent Study" covered a lot of good and ills. Our district was going for certification of some sort and had auditors in for nearly everything from class sizes, to budget, to grounds. If it could be quantified, they did it. It did get me the 2nd level class as I said, it also got me a second level of my animation classe. This day and age of budgetary constraints and lack of support when it comes to increases, can be beaten if you strike when the opportunity arises. The adult class helped as the director for Federal Programs was in the class many years, often unallocated money would find its way for equipment. I also had the head of personnel in the class many years. Think these things don't help-think again!






I also have my share of independent study students, but really only the one ceramics class. The problem is space, and the studio is tiny. Thus I only have three wheels. I simply require all students to make "something" on the wheel, so even the ones who don't like to get messy will try it. I give regular demos for inspiration (I hope). If I could get a bigger classroom I'd like to get more wheels, and perhaps try a ceramics 2 class, even if it had to be at the same time as 1. Thanks for the posts. They are helpful, as an art teacher's' dilemma often involves getting the most result from the least resources...


I was moved into the basement from upstairs in my regular room-they needed the space for Social Studies classes! I had a room that was about 15 by 20. Used 8ft melamine top cafeteria tables, kiln in same room with 2 wheels. No elbow room! I had a door in the back of the room that had a small hole in it. I kept seeing this large room cluttered with all sorts of janitorial stuff and other supplies. I lusted after that room! So I started building frame work to get it. "It really is difficult to store projects that are larger, and have everyone rolling out slabs on the tables do you mind if I let them do it on the floor in the hall?" "Do I have to take 25 students this semester< you've seen how crowded the room is?" "Is there another space in the building that would allow for the larger class?" Mind you this did not happen in a day, but in 3 years I had that room! This and the room I was presently in. The new space was 15 by 40 Room for the new Walker pug mill, a wedging table 6 work benches, lots of storage racks for projects, potters wheels in old room grew to 6. Maybe your building has a space. . . .

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#60 Natania

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 10:01 AM

[quote name='Pres' date='05 January 2013 - 09:33 AM' timestamp='1357396430' post='27338']
[quote name='Natania Hume' date='05 January 2013 - 06:24 AM' timestamp='1357385059' post='27334']
[quote name='Pres' date='03 January 2013 - 09:17 AM' timestamp='1357222666' post='27219']
[quote name='Benzine' date='02 January 2013 - 11:36 PM' timestamp='1357187766' post='27208']
[quote name='Pres' date='02 January 2013 - 06:00 PM' timestamp='1357171246' post='27185']
[quote name='Benzine' date='02 January 2013 - 03:17 PM' timestamp='1357157877' post='27161']
[quote name='TJR' date='02 January 2013 - 01:46 PM' timestamp='1357155962' post='27156']
Benzine;
Sounds like you have been doing it for a while. I am in my 27 year of high school art teaching.Actually, I taught elementary art for four years, but went back to high school. Those elementary teachers teach right until June 30! I'm in Canada, remember?
My question to you;"Are your classes multi-graded? If they were separated by grade, as in gr.9,then10,then11,etc., then you could build on proficiency.I have separate grades-two semesters. I have those students for 75 minutes a day. I have one Brent wheel, so don't spend too much time on throwing. We do a six week clay unit, as well as all the other media, like painting and design and drawing. I do five units a semester.
As for those bad kids, everyone gets them. You try to be tough and make the students understand that you have a serious course. I have thrown a lot of students out, after giving the written assignment, going to admin, calling the parents. I hate calling parents.
Because I have separate grades, as you get into the higher grades, you have less difficulties. Grade nine is usually the toughest grade, but most of the time they settle into it.
Did I mention that I was voted the Canadian High School Art Educator of the year for 2012? Been doing it a long time.
Tom Roberts
[/quote]

Elementary Art.....I love the kids, hate the projects. The concepts and techniques are too basic. I realize you have to teach the basics/ foundations, but that aint for me. Also, from my experience, elementary art classes exist to make holiday decorations for parents and props for school plays.

My classes are indeed multi-grade, 9-12. It is one of the two classes in the Art Department, with no prerequisite. So all of them, unless they have experience elsewhere, are at the same level, in terms of clay work, namely the potter's wheel.

Congratulations on the honor.
[/quote]

You asked about how I allotted time for wheel throwing? Tough one. I didn't , at least not in the Ceramics one classes. After teaching Ceramics 1 for several years, and having many students take it a second time to get more experience where they would work on the wheel-Ceramics 2 happened. It came about as an argument with audits, class requirements, and student needs. In the end I held them over a barrel with the fact that they had in the past allowed several students over several years to take an unscheduled, unnamed, Ceramics course-not a good thing to be on the audit. So I got a Ceramics 2 class, they got me to teach it at the same time as Ceramics 1. Class sizes were limited to 20 in the end, no matter what the mix. Ceramics 2 was held to 5 as I only had six wheels. You know, it worked out well. I would do demonstrations for the 1's, move into the wheel room and check on progress, make suggestions and adjustments to posture, hand position, grip etc. Then go back to the 1's, back and forth the entire period-50 minutes-5 days a week. I don't believe you can teach anyone the wheel, they have to learn it-like riding a bike. I started them with 9 inch cylinders with 3lb. Once completed-usually by 1st MP. Then had them choose an object they were interested in making. I did demonstration on the form, and had them research variations and present sketches to me. Then they were required to create 3 in series. They also had to create a slab and wheel thrown combination pot, and their final benchmark was a teapot form. We had done mugs, and lids as sides and the final demo was a series of pouring spouts. Kept them busy, kept me running, but I loved it.
[/quote]

Classes, that don't exist? I can't imagine doing something like that.....hehe.... I do "Independent Study" courses, for any subject I teach. The administration hasn't said anything about it yet.
I wished I had a higher level ceramics class I could teach, so I could have the students focus on the wheel, but alas, I don't see that happening. So my best solution, seems to be, cramming in as much as possible. Sadly this means, that I am somewhat tied, to basic forms. I do show examples of more complex, and multi-piece vessels, and I have had students make an attempt at those. I also have students sketch out ideas for their wheel projects, before they start on the wheel. I tell them, that I can't help on the wheel, until I know what they are going form.

I do definitely agree with you, that you can't teach the wheel. I tell the students that, when I'm doing my demo, especially with centering and pulling the clay. It's just something you have to get a feel for, and you can't teach that.
[/quote]

Yes "independent Study" covered a lot of good and ills. Our district was going for certification of some sort and had auditors in for nearly everything from class sizes, to budget, to grounds. If it could be quantified, they did it. It did get me the 2nd level class as I said, it also got me a second level of my animation classe. This day and age of budgetary constraints and lack of support when it comes to increases, can be beaten if you strike when the opportunity arises. The adult class helped as the director for Federal Programs was in the class many years, often unallocated money would find its way for equipment. I also had the head of personnel in the class many years. Think these things don't help-think again!
[/quote]





I also have my share of independent study students, but really only the one ceramics class. The problem is space, and the studio is tiny. Thus I only have three wheels. I simply require all students to make "something" on the wheel, so even the ones who don't like to get messy will try it. I give regular demos for inspiration (I hope). If I could get a bigger classroom I'd like to get more wheels, and perhaps try a ceramics 2 class, even if it had to be at the same time as 1. Thanks for the posts. They are helpful, as an art teacher's' dilemma often involves getting the most result from the least resources...
[/quote]

I was moved into the basement from upstairs in my regular room-they needed the space for Social Studies classes! I had a room that was about 15 by 20. Used 8ft melamine top cafeteria tables, kiln in same room with 2 wheels. No elbow room! I had a door in the back of the room that had a small hole in it. I kept seeing this large room cluttered with all sorts of janitorial stuff and other supplies. I lusted after that room! So I started building frame work to get it. "It really is difficult to store projects that are larger, and have everyone rolling out slabs on the tables do you mind if I let them do it on the floor in the hall?" "Do I have to take 25 students this semester< you've seen how crowded the room is?" "Is there another space in the building that would allow for the larger class?" Mind you this did not happen in a day, but in 3 years I had that room! This and the room I was presently in. The new space was 15 by 40 Room for the new Walker pug mill, a wedging table 6 work benches, lots of storage racks for projects, potters wheels in old room grew to 6. Maybe your building has a space. . . .


Yes. I lust after a mostly unused office accross the hall which would be perfect to at least put the kiln (has a wall to the outside for the vent) so that it isn't in the classroom, and perhaps a wheel or two. But I've asked for it and been refused. The office is only used to distribute yearbooks at the end of the year, grr! Ceramics is a popular class, and I'v reiterated that I could take more students if I had bigger space, but to no avail. I think the problem might be administrative, and space is quite tight at this school so if there is extra it is likely to go to an academic need...however we are embarking on a new strategic plan, so perhaps someday in the far off) future....




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