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Buying my first kiln


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#1 myrmaedluvr

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:30 PM

Hi Guys,

Thanks for your help with my free kiln conundrum; I've decided not to get either one of them as they'd be more trouble than they're worth. Instead, I'm looking at purchasing a new one. Right now I'm considering the Cress ET28; has anyone had experience with it? Here's what I'm looking for in a kiln:

minimum 8 cubic feet
3" brick
top loading (would LOVE a front loader but considering the extra cost, that just ain't gonna happen!)

It's going to be outside on a small patio so I doubt anything over 10 cubic feet would fit. Thoughts? Ideas? Thanks!

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:29 PM

Cress kilns fire just fine, but setup and maintenance is difficult. The one piece outer jacket means the whole thing must be moved in one piece. And worse, if you need to replace a brick you have to loosen up the whole thing. That means removing every piece of hardware from the kiln, loosening the jacket, unstacking the bricks to get to the one you need to replace, restacking everything and reassembling it all. I recommend getting a kiln built in sections. It's easier to set up and easier to move.

Nothing beats L&L for durability. If you'd like more specific recommendations on kiln brands, send me an email.

Is your patio totally covered and weatherproof? Water will destroy a kiln.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#3 myrmaedluvr

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:01 PM

Cress kilns fire just fine, but setup and maintenance is difficult. The one piece outer jacket means the whole thing must be moved in one piece. And worse, if you need to replace a brick you have to loosen up the whole thing. That means removing every piece of hardware from the kiln, loosening the jacket, unstacking the bricks to get to the one you need to replace, restacking everything and reassembling it all. I recommend getting a kiln built in sections. It's easier to set up and easier to move.

Nothing beats L&L for durability. If you'd like more specific recommendations on kiln brands, send me an email.

Is your patio totally covered and weatherproof? Water will destroy a kiln.


Thanks for your response. I believe that the kiln I'm looking at has an option of making it sectional (could be wrong; looked at so many kilns my eyes are crossed!). I definitely dont want something so complicated to maintain. I'll look into the L&L. My patio is not covered but I plan on keeping the kiln covered with a tarp when not in use. I'm in AZ so we don't get a lot of rain as it is. I would LOVE recommendations for other kilns!

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:18 PM

Send me an email at neil@neilestrickgallery.com I'll send you my list of why I like L&L kilns.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#5 DirtRoads

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 09:43 PM

Question: Does anyone have a kiln outside, just covered with a tarp?

#6 DAY

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:30 AM

You will need more than a tarp, even in in AZ. Because the soft brick CANNOT be allowed to get wet. (the kiln will explode! ) A simple shed roof will suffice. I have been using new and used L&L kilns for 30 years. Make craigs list your new best friend. . .

#7 neilestrick

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 11:35 AM

You will need more than a tarp, even in in AZ. Because the soft brick CANNOT be allowed to get wet. (the kiln will explode! ) A simple shed roof will suffice. I have been using new and used L&L kilns for 30 years. Make craigs list your new best friend. . .


Bricks can dry out. The computer can fry and the metal parts rust.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#8 Mark C.

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 06:22 PM

L&L is my 1st choice as well.-buy once and you will not regret it ever.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#9 DirtRoads

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 09:57 PM

L&L is my 1st choice as well.-buy once and you will not regret it ever.
Mark


Yes, I've seen you state this before. And it prompted me to order a L&L. Should receive it and have it installed in a few weeks. Thank you for sharing information/opinions.

I do hope people are paying attention to what some of these pros are saying about putting kilns in unprotected areas. I don't know that much but for certain you can not leave an electric kiln exposed to weather. Anyone can construct a pole shed to cover a kiln for a very small investment, less than $200. (provided your area doesn't have code restrictions on outdoor structures in your back yard)




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