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rbill

Sandp?aper

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I use a sanding block with a diamond dust grit. It tackles rough bisque surfaces really fast. It can take rough spots off of glaze fired pots too. And after about 5 years it does not seem to have worn down at all. The friend from whom I learned about these had one that was 20 years old, and at that point she said "I might need a new new soon."

Here's a link to one that looks a lot mine, but you should google around for the best price:

http://www.hisglassw...ct_detail&p=384

I bought a few different size grits, but my favorite is the 200 grit.

-Mea

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What is the best kind of sandpaper to use on bisque ware?

 

 

I buy plain old every cloth, it seems to hold up better than the sand papers. However, I have been using a "synthetic fiber pad" to sand my greenware for the past several years and usually don't have to sand in bisque.

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Guest JBaymore

Wear a respirator or use GOOD local pickup ventilation!

 

best,

 

............john

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I use a sanding block with a diamond dust grit. It tackles rough bisque surfaces really fast. It can take rough spots off of glaze fired pots too. And after about 5 years it does not seem to have worn down at all. The friend from whom I learned about these had one that was 20 years old, and at that point she said "I might need a new new soon."

Here's a link to one that looks a lot mine, but you should google around for the best price:

http://www.hisglassw...ct_detail&p=384

I bought a few different size grits, but my favorite is the 200 grit.

-Mea

 

 

 

I purchase mine from http://www.toolocity.com/diamondhandpads.aspx Good prices and fast service. I mostly use them (100 grit and 200 grit) to clean bottoms after glaze firing. I try to clean up ware during the leatherhard stage to avoid any sanding of bisque.

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I use a sanding block with a diamond dust grit. It tackles rough bisque surfaces really fast. It can take rough spots off of glaze fired pots too. And after about 5 years it does not seem to have worn down at all. The friend from whom I learned about these had one that was 20 years old, and at that point she said "I might need a new new soon."

Here's a link to one that looks a lot mine, but you should google around for the best price:

http://www.hisglassw...ct_detail&p=384

I bought a few different size grits, but my favorite is the 200 grit.

-Mea

 

 

 

I purchase mine from http://www.toolocity...ndhandpads.aspx Good prices and fast service. I mostly use them (100 grit and 200 grit) to clean bottoms after glaze firing. I try to clean up ware during the leatherhard stage to avoid any sanding of bisque.

 

 

I used to be able to get mine from the floor buffers used in the HS. The centers popped out for a 3-4 inch pad. Sometimes I got some of the used pads and used them-pretty damn cheap!

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I use the diapad like Mea. It is a diamond grit sanding pad and they do wonders. They come in various grits.

They come in all grits. David Roberts sands his Naked Raku pieces with them and they feel like they are glazed.

Marcia

 

 

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I try not to need sand paper at all. check my work before I take it off the wheel/work board, then after triming, and before I put them into the bisque kiln. If I see an error or fault a damp spoung can usually fixes it. I have had a small pack of 200 grit sand paper in my studio for about 6 years haven't used one full sheet yet and most of what I used it for was to sand danaged edges on wooden tools. In my opinion sand paper is for those who don't check the finish before they finish.

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Guest JBaymore

The only time I use sandpaper is for cleanup of finish fired wares (woodfire). I use wet 200 grit silicon carbide paper to finsih polish many pieces... particulary youhen charcoal wares.

 

best,

 

.................john

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