Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks Mark  C. 

  Will look some more. Checked out the Ceramic Shop and their cordierite shelves are special order and take 6wks. Yes this takes time. 

1 hour ago, neilestrick said:

You can run your power burner off an extension cord. The burner blower uses very little power.

Thanks Neil, glad your keeping watch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, postalpotter said:

Thanks Mark  C. 

  Will look some more. Checked out the Ceramic Shop and their cordierite shelves are special order and take 6wks. Yes this takes time. 

Thanks Neil, glad your keeping watch.

Be sure to talk to Ward about your gas source. I'm assuming you'll be firing off propane? Find out what size tank he recommends, and you'll probably want to by the regulator from him, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, neilestrick said:

Be sure to talk to Ward about your gas source. I'm assuming you'll be firing off propane? Find out what size tank he recommends, and you'll probably want to by the regulator from him, too.

I have spent a good bit of time looking over forced air burners and that is going to be my choice. I have little doubt I can build one and after thinking a little of the baso and thermocouple on my hot water heater I understand more about the system then I thought. I will buy the baso , thermocouple and the regulator from Ward but I will leave out the electric solenoid. I will be very near the kiln if there is a power outage.

 And yes I will be using bottled gas.

 I will need a bit of schooling on BTU's and orifice size in the future.

I have also read in a post by Marcia Selsor and I believe one by you that an updraft kiln has cold spots in it and that a drowndraft heats more evenly. Is that something I should consider, can cold spots be avoided in the updraft? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, postalpotter said:

I have spent a good bit of time looking over forced air burners and that is going to be my choice. I have little doubt I can build one and after thinking a little of the baso and thermocouple on my hot water heater I understand more about the system then I thought. I will buy the baso , thermocouple and the regulator from Ward but I will leave out the electric solenoid. I will be very near the kiln if there is a power outage.

 And yes I will be using bottled gas.

 I will need a bit of schooling on BTU's and orifice size in the future.

I have also read in a post by Marcia Selsor and I believe one by you that an updraft kiln has cold spots in it and that a drowndraft heats more evenly. Is that something I should consider, can cold spots be avoided in the updraft? 

 

Downdraft will heat more evenly, and won't be much more difficult to build, but in a kiln that small it's not too difficult to fire an updraft fairly evenly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the burner I built in 2004. I've built a number of these over the years. It's very simple, doesn't cost too much. For a small kiln you could use a blower in the 80CFM range. The main burner pipe is 2", make it at least 8" long. Too short and the air and gas don't mix as well. The orifice holes are drilled into the 1/4" pipe running vertically through the 2" coupling. Drilling out the coupling was the hardest part, because it's a cast fitting. If you can find it as a non-cast, like the pipe, then it's easier to drill out. McMaster-Carr has them I think. If you can afford it, get a retention tip for the burner pipe. It'll greatly improve the flame quality. Note the tee with a pressure gauge. That's very important, as it provides for knowing where you've set the pressure. Guessing at the gas setting by how far you've turned the gas cock doesn't cut it in my book. This burner has everything wired up through an electric solenoid, high temp shutoff, and timer. If you've only got the Baso valve, and the power goes out, you'll have pure gas pumping into the kiln, which will make for a big lazy flame coming out the flue. If you have a flammable structure over the kiln, it could catch fire. I've seen it. The solenoid isn't all that expensive, and it's easy to wire up. This burner also has the blower wired to a dimmer so it can be slowed down for lower pressure settings like at the beginning of a firing.

Burner.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not planning to build a structure over the kiln. I just plan to cover it with a removable  cover at the moment and if I do it will be something on the lines of an aluminum patio cover .

 I like the burner thanks for the input. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to the parish office of code enforcement, county for the rest of ya. I was told at first that all I could build was an 8 cubic ft. kiln,  not over 50,000btu's  and it must be in an enclosed building. 

 Then I was told that it was my property and I could do as I wanted and if someone complained I would have to take it down. So I will get the bricks this weekend weather permitting.

 I just hope my neighbors like their mugs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, postalpotter said:

Went to the parish office of code enforcement, county for the rest of ya. I was told at first that all I could build was an 8 cubic ft. kiln,  not over 50,000btu's  and it must be in an enclosed building. 

 Then I was told that it was my property and I could do as I wanted and if someone complained I would have to take it down. So I will get the bricks this weekend weather permitting.

 I just hope my neighbors like their mugs!

Read between the lines-The kiln no matter what size will be 8 cubic feet and not over 50,000btus and will be covered.Even if it larger or smaller.

Make what you want-seems pretty simple

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.