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Happy New Year to All!

I'm trying to come up with a goldenrod or deep yellow-gold colored glaze (gloss or matte) that will work at cone 5/6 in oxidation. I'd like to achieve the color without using stains but am open to all ideas. I'm using it on white stoneware. I'm new to mixing my own glazes and have a library full of books on glazing but can't seem to find a recipe that I like.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions!

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Mason  6464 looks the closest to a goldenrod yellow to my eye, have you tried that one? It's not fussy as to the base glaze. How much stain are you using? Reason I ask is with many stains you don't need much to get a nice colour. 

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 When I was working in oxidation I got mildly infatuated with crystals for a bit. One happy result was a very runny yellow. I was more naive back then and didn't have the luxury of software or 'professional' advice so all excuses aside this was a remarkable yellow as long as you took caution and were prepared for some mishaps.

custer feldspar 58

whiting 15

Zinc Oxide 15

copper oxide 1.5

Titanium Dioxide 3

Spodumene 3

Tin Oxide 4

We used it at a 9 but i suspect it might work lower. Potash feldspar might work better - or worse :) I found something that worked first try and never looked back.

 

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32 minutes ago, C.Banks said:

 When I was working in oxidation I got mildly infatuated with crystals for a bit. One happy result was a very runny yellow. I was more naive back then and didn't have the luxury of software or 'professional' advice so all excuses aside this was a remarkable yellow as long as you took caution and were prepared for some mishaps.

custer feldspar 58

whiting 15

Zinc Oxide 15

copper oxide 1.5

Titanium Dioxide 3

Spodumene 3

Tin Oxide 4

We used it at a 9 but i suspect it might work lower. Potash feldspar might work better - or worse :) I found something that worked first try and never looked back.

 

this one sounds exciting! I'll try it!

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39 minutes ago, Min said:

Mason  6464 looks the closest to a goldenrod yellow to my eye, have you tried that one? It's not fussy as to the base glaze. How much stain are you using? Reason I ask is with many stains you don't need much to get a nice colour. 

I think I have that one, if not it's easy to get. Thanks Min

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59 minutes ago, C.Banks said:

 When I was working in oxidation I got mildly infatuated with crystals for a bit. One happy result was a very runny yellow. I was more naive back then and didn't have the luxury of software or 'professional' advice so all excuses aside this was a remarkable yellow as long as you took caution and were prepared for some mishaps.

custer feldspar 58

whiting 15

Zinc Oxide 15

copper oxide 1.5

Titanium Dioxide 3

Spodumene 3

Tin Oxide 4

We used it at a 9 but i suspect it might work lower. Potash feldspar might work better - or worse :) I found something that worked first try and never looked back.

 

If this is a crytalline glaze, it will not behave at all like typical glazes. For starters, it has no clay in it, so won't stay suspended in the bucket. Second, crystalline glazes are super runny, to the point that they require a catch basin underneath them to collect them. Firing this cooler, like to cone 6, may solve that problem, but I would still put a dish underneath the first round of tests.

Shelly M and Rae Reich like this

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48 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

If this is a crytalline glaze, it will not behave at all like typical glazes. For starters, it has no clay in it, so won't stay suspended in the bucket. Second, crystalline glazes are super runny, to the point that they require a catch basin underneath them to collect them. Firing this cooler, like to cone 6, may solve that problem, but I would still put a dish underneath the first round of tests.

Looking back I did a lot of ill advised stuff. I was younger and didn't know any better.

It had issues for certain but the result was worth it, for the most part.

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@Shelly M, expanding on what Neil said about blending stains to get the colour you want. I'm working on a chartreuse / pale bright green using stains. In the picture below of my test pieces the first tile is a light green stain, the last is canary yellow the tiles in between are a blend of the two. Takes about 15 minutes to do a blend like this, total stain in each glaze test is 2% which got me in the ballpark of what I want, now I'm fine tuning the amount of stain as I want to reduce the strength of the colour. Easy to do a blend like this if you need to in order to get the goldenrod yellow you are looking for.

5a5f9e8e5d156_001-1.jpg.4aab0c7b2d6f7ea4ea8d5313f1d587ba.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Min said:

@Shelly M, expanding on what Neil said about blending stains to get the colour you want. I'm working on a chartreuse / pale bright green using stains. In the picture below of my test pieces the first tile is a light green stain, the last is canary yellow the tiles in between are a blend of the two. Takes about 15 minutes to do a blend like this, total stain in each glaze test is 2% which got me in the ballpark of what I want, now I'm fine tuning the amount of stain as I want to reduce the strength of the colour. Easy to do a blend like this if you need to in order to get the goldenrod yellow you are looking for.

5a5f9e8e5d156_001-1.jpg.4aab0c7b2d6f7ea4ea8d5313f1d587ba.jpg

 

Thanks so much! Nice test tiles. I think this is a good solution

 

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20 hours ago, C.Banks said:

Looking back I did a lot of ill advised stuff. I was younger and didn't know any better.

It had issues for certain but the result was worth it, for the most part.

@C.BanksI don't think it was ill advised at all. This is typical for crystalline glazes, I just wanted @Shelly M to know what to expect from that type of glaze.

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