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1515art

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  1. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Rae Reich in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    Lol, if only my dirt had enough gold where that was a factor and actually the golds never supposed to get that far as the settling tanks are only for the soil/clay suspended in the water when the waters to dirty the fine gold won’t settle fast enough in the sluice and then it will be lost in the tailings.
  2. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Rae Reich in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    I was amazed how well this worked when I saw a guy using it moving water between tubs, some ancient technique for watering crops or something like that .  JohnnyK is right and this isn’t for everyone and if I was concerned about an accidental overflow I would drop the whole thing down into a water tight box and add a p trap at the end. I’m using it inside my studio this way for now and my clay water is diverted outside into the garden and waters the hedges so the traps not needed.  The water level between the first and second tanks stays very close and the third tank is slightly lower. I think the large diameter pipe has little friction loss at this volume so the siphon action with atmospheric pressure keeps it fairly level. The tubes are 4 or 5 inches off the bottom so I think it will hold at least a gallon or two of sediment.


     
  3. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Min in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    I thought I’d share a trick I picked up for separating mud from water while running a recirculating power sluice looking for gold. The same system seems to work well for the sink drain in my studio, it works off of some simple hydraulics and siphons water from tank to tank giving the heavy particles time to settle before exiting the tanks.
     
    I used three 5gal trash bins and connected them using 2” ABS, each connector was made from one 2” U joint, two 2” elbow and two 8” long nipples. The drain is one 2” ABS adaptor and a 2” sink drain gasket and one 24” long ABS nipple, everything glued with medium ABS cement. The elbow on the bottom allows you to fill the tubes and submerse them into the tanks while maintaining the siphon in the connecting tubes. Total cost for everything from Home Depot was under $50 and build time under an hour.
     
    The system easily handles the volume of the water as it drains directly down into the first bin and when the bin is at capacity with solids it is simple to remove, empty and replace. The design allows infinite number of settling bins and any size and shape of container pretty much can be adapted to work, so I think this could be made from a variety of free parts.





  4. Like
    1515art got a reaction from JohnnyK in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    Bill, I’m sure you are right and I can adjust as needed, good thing is the way it is now when not throwing clay I can convert my clay sink into a mini clean-up gold sluice.
  5. Like
    1515art reacted to Fred Sweet in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    Ah, but gold particles have more mass (think weight) than clay particles and drop out of the suspension quickly. Whereas, the fine clay particles need a “slow flow” to separate. Just something else to consider.
    Regards,
    Fred
  6. Like
    1515art reacted to JohnnyK in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    So, by keeping the openings of the u-tubes well below the level of the drain opening you are able to maintain the siphon action and retain the water in the u-tubes... I like the idea for an outdoor sink, but it obviously won't work with indoor plumbing...Thanks!
  7. Like
    1515art reacted to Bill Kielb in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    Nice,
    Siphoning  off the bottom reduces the effectiveness a bit. Think about dropping the fluid in low (Dip tube)  and Discharging high to be dropped in again low and discharged high again. Clay is so fine that you are trying to reduce the water velocity as much as practical to settle out the finest particles. Discharging from a small diameter pipe into a large diameter bucket is key to reducing the velocity.
    Right now you do not need the siphon pickup action, the water will exit at top level on its own. I suspect your first bucket is higher than the second and second higher than the third else the bucket overflows before establishing siphon action.
    a simple single basin with connections at the top is likely as effective for the studio and is usually built using a bucket from your local hardware, a sealing top, some 1-1/4” fittings and some vacuum hose.  These can be hard piped but most folks opt for the plug in vacuum hose for serviceability. The bucket needs to be lower than the  sewer pipe that serves your sink drain, which usually means a 2-1/2 gallon bucket. Cost, probably 30.00 and reusable after clean out. These can be daisy chained as well to double or triple separate. Oh trap  can remain on your sink to ensure no sewer gas.
  8. Like
    1515art reacted to Bill Kielb in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    Glad it works for you.
    Again, drop it in low, discharge high will improve your settling and give you more effective settling area.
  9. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Min in Simple DIY sink clay trap   
    I thought I’d share a trick I picked up for separating mud from water while running a recirculating power sluice looking for gold. The same system seems to work well for the sink drain in my studio, it works off of some simple hydraulics and siphons water from tank to tank giving the heavy particles time to settle before exiting the tanks.
     
    I used three 5gal trash bins and connected them using 2” ABS, each connector was made from one 2” U joint, two 2” elbow and two 8” long nipples. The drain is one 2” ABS adaptor and a 2” sink drain gasket and one 24” long ABS nipple, everything glued with medium ABS cement. The elbow on the bottom allows you to fill the tubes and submerse them into the tanks while maintaining the siphon in the connecting tubes. Total cost for everything from Home Depot was under $50 and build time under an hour.
     
    The system easily handles the volume of the water as it drains directly down into the first bin and when the bin is at capacity with solids it is simple to remove, empty and replace. The design allows infinite number of settling bins and any size and shape of container pretty much can be adapted to work, so I think this could be made from a variety of free parts.





  10. Like
    1515art reacted to liambesaw in No shelves   
    I'd ask the person in charge at the studio
  11. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Re - glazing a fired peice.   
    I’ve had good result with a refire  most of the time.  lots of good suggestions and another trick that will make the fresh glaze stick better is put the piece in the microwave oven for a minute then try and keep fresh fingerprints off. Helps to stop the fresh liquid glaze from crawling on application and the warm ceramic fresh from the microwave helps to get a thicker application of glaze. Another re glaze technique  is chose a second layer that is a lower temperature, allowing the layers to stack instead of flowing together keeping in mind the intended use of the ceramic item. On multiple firing at lower subsequent cones puts less stress on the clay body than firing up to full vitrification repeatedly it going to depend on the desired final outcome. One more thing be patient once the wet glaze is on the pot sometimes forcing it to dry to quickly will make the new un-fired glaze crack and peel as it dries if this starts to happen put the piece in a cool shaded area to dry more slowly.
  12. Like
    1515art reacted to Rex Johnson in Re - glazing a fired peice.   
    I recently fired  2 dozen cups to cone 6 and forgot to glaze them...(don't ask).
    I took a chance and sprayed them with clear and re-fired. I couldn't believe it,  if they turned out perfect!

  13. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Re - glazing a fired peice.   
    I’ve had good result with a refire  most of the time.  lots of good suggestions and another trick that will make the fresh glaze stick better is put the piece in the microwave oven for a minute then try and keep fresh fingerprints off. Helps to stop the fresh liquid glaze from crawling on application and the warm ceramic fresh from the microwave helps to get a thicker application of glaze. Another re glaze technique  is chose a second layer that is a lower temperature, allowing the layers to stack instead of flowing together keeping in mind the intended use of the ceramic item. On multiple firing at lower subsequent cones puts less stress on the clay body than firing up to full vitrification repeatedly it going to depend on the desired final outcome. One more thing be patient once the wet glaze is on the pot sometimes forcing it to dry to quickly will make the new un-fired glaze crack and peel as it dries if this starts to happen put the piece in a cool shaded area to dry more slowly.
  14. Like
    1515art reacted to Hulk in Let's critique my throwing skills   
    Nice work Shawn! Smooth an' easy, nice.
    I keep a large (Hulk size, o'course) sponge at the wheel (a grout sponge cut to about two thirds full size) - handy for cleaning hands, basin edge, tools, etc.; the smaller sponges - round and cut pieces of larger sponges (thanks Bill VG for that tip - purpose cut shapes) - are handy for working with the piece. Any road, I rag for drying only - hands, wheel head - not cleaning.
    At top of third pull, looks like a bit o'wobble introduced (~2 mins)? As reaching top of pull, slow the wheel (and therefore vertical speed) a bit, and remove hands/tools from work slooow and easy. Errm, maybe that wobble was a'ready there, idk. O'course, I still get wobbles, just startin' out here - less often than a few month ago, however.
    Looks like you keep just a few tools in the pan, easily found, aye. I'm engraining habit of putting tools down in same place (on right of pan for me, as clockwiser…), from right to left: needle, metal rib o'death, two wood knives, two wood ribs, bucket, small sponges in front o' bucket, Hulk sponge propped in back o'bucket, corked string (for hump cuts) and wire hanging off back o'bucket. Some o' the accomplished throwers spend time casting about for encrusted tools, heh.
    I toss the wetter clay and smoodge into the wet reclaim bucket just off my right foot, onna floor; the dryer chunks and clumps I'll pile up and later toss into the dry out (to later re-slake) bucket, hence the water bucket doesn't load up as quickly. ...which ain' faster, maybe slower.
    I'm ribbing the outside and using leather on the rim as well; looks like I'm wringing out the leather more - not much difference there.
    I'm not wiring off wet work - shuffling bats for me, else off the hump, and there, have found that taking a bit more clay (to later trim away, ugh) on the base to grab reduces the chance of deforming the work. Lately, just lids off the hump, as I'm measuring clay ball weight - trying for uniformity. I use plaster bats onna clay pad most o'th'time, powder board and plastic bats else.
    I'm not finding a lot of production/repeat work vids to watch out there; the Clinton vids are, imo, good. There's a few others. Check out ton a day Isaac Button.
    Clinton points out that making the same moves =repeat work. Aye that! He doesn't use any measuring sticks, don' need'm. Wow. Hence, I'm working on repeating the moves.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMjn7CrZp2vIqT1BwA8sZUQ
     
    Short version: try using a big sponge to clean hands, tools, etc. Put it down all wrung out and ready for next time.
     
    Second vid (is that Neil E? Hi Neil!), note full cone up an' down (more than magic three, he went four); imo, this is key to round and true work, for the clay is more homogenized and fully swirled about (err, "aligned particles" - meh, don' have a scanning electron microscope handy). From there, note attention to centering (no run out) before starting to open.
      Openin' - yeah, ah can't do that, my nervous system bein' what it is. I'm steading my hands on the piece whilst opening, just what it is, hence it's two thumbs for me, one feels, one supports, and the hands steadied by the centered lump. If the lump is running out, then stop, not time to open yet.
      Startin' th' pulls, note the time/revs spent at the bottom, getting clay moved into position; can't rush that.
    Nice work! Thanks Babs
  15. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Pres in New Potter   
    Take classes, you will learn something new from every teacher you have, this book was one I found helpful many years ago when I was learning to throw, “Pottery on the Wheel” by Elisabeth S. woody I did see the book for under $5 on line and internet videos were something not available when I was a young potter.  I made a throwing video back in the 1970’s it was a grant funded project I was asked to do with one of the professors, probably good for everyone I don’t think it ever made the transition to digital.
    good luck
  16. Like
    1515art got a reaction from VladCruceanu in Irregular shape pot   
    Hard to say exactly how, he probably uses a combination of techniques depending on the piece.  If it were me and I was making only one or two carving would work (taking away), if I were making more than a couple, or if they were large l would use clay slabs in a form assembled on/in a form and do alterations. Friend of mine when I was working out of a studio in Berkley, Ca. Was building giant planters for commercial buildings these were angular pieces 3’x4’x3’ he would pull them from the wood supports and beat them with metal chains and other stuff to give them texture. I might also try using a multi part plaster press/cast mold and then hand alterations if I wanted to do large production.
  17. Like
    1515art reacted to liambesaw in Irregular shape pot   
    Well you could go at it from two ways, addition or subtraction.  Addition you can build a slab box and then add the angled accent pieces, subtraction the other way, build a thick walled box and use a cutter to make facets.  
    That's how I'd go at it first.
  18. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Hulk in How do you open up the clay after centering,   
    It depends on how much clay I am throwing, I might just use a finger tip if only a small amount of clay is involved and on very large forms I might push down with the palm of my left hand really forcing the clay to open up. I think the one thing that remains constant and is the key point is I always open just slightly off center usually to the right and if I remain steady the hole will open just slightly larger than my finger(s) and I find it easy to stay centered with the pressure of the spinning clay at a steady pace from only one direction. The problem with opening by pushing directly down in the exact center is the spinning clay tends to push your fingers unpredictably and you can get a bit of a wobble as the pressure on your finger changes with the spinning clay.
    Next I’ll squeeze the clay between the fingers and thumb of my left hand while pushing down on the to of the donut with my fight hand and slowly pull towards me feeling the clay and giving it time to respond. I maintain bottom thickness with my left index finger as I open and stop pulling when I have the desired inside diameter established. Squeezing the clay at the bottom of the donut after opening will help move some of the clay up and help start your first pull.
  19. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Hulk in How do you open up the clay after centering,   
    It depends on how much clay I am throwing, I might just use a finger tip if only a small amount of clay is involved and on very large forms I might push down with the palm of my left hand really forcing the clay to open up. I think the one thing that remains constant and is the key point is I always open just slightly off center usually to the right and if I remain steady the hole will open just slightly larger than my finger(s) and I find it easy to stay centered with the pressure of the spinning clay at a steady pace from only one direction. The problem with opening by pushing directly down in the exact center is the spinning clay tends to push your fingers unpredictably and you can get a bit of a wobble as the pressure on your finger changes with the spinning clay.
    Next I’ll squeeze the clay between the fingers and thumb of my left hand while pushing down on the to of the donut with my fight hand and slowly pull towards me feeling the clay and giving it time to respond. I maintain bottom thickness with my left index finger as I open and stop pulling when I have the desired inside diameter established. Squeezing the clay at the bottom of the donut after opening will help move some of the clay up and help start your first pull.
  20. Like
    1515art got a reaction from liambesaw in QotW:What is the value of formal education in developing Ceramic skills?   
    Times were very different when I was in college back in the 1970’s the whole getting sued thing wasn’t so out of control. I lived very near my local community college and the ceramics professor gave me a key to the studio so I could help fire the kilns, two big old alpines. 
  21. Like
    1515art got a reaction from liambesaw in QotW:What is the value of formal education in developing Ceramic skills?   
    Times were very different when I was in college back in the 1970’s the whole getting sued thing wasn’t so out of control. I lived very near my local community college and the ceramics professor gave me a key to the studio so I could help fire the kilns, two big old alpines. 
  22. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Gabby in Hand-building advice   
    Gabby, depends on what I’m making and just how I’m planning on finishing, trimming and those things. For larger pieces when I’m working wet so I can touch, shape and handle without the shape getting damaged I’ll use a heat gun to firm up the clay in critical places and leave things softer at the joints/join areas and where I’m planning other shaping or  more throwing, using a soft touch is also important. When working with wetter clay I can work the seam making everything one piece. Same thing throwing a tall cylinder sometimes  I do it in two sections throwing the bottom section normally, the top section is the same diameter thrown bottomless. Then just a tiny bit of firming with the heat gun before quickly inverting the second cylinder and securing It onto the top of the first cylinder when the pieces are joined air trapped inside helps support it structurally until the top batt is wired off from what is now the top of the tall cylinder. If the clay is still to wet to support its own weight use the heat gun to firm it up before wiring off the batt.  An additional advantage inverting the top section is any clay thickness in what is now the top of the cylinder can be thrown more if everything is still on center. I know one artist that makes very large round forms joining slabs of clay around different size beach balls, deflating the ball and removing it when the clay was firm enough to support its own weight.
    Sometimes leather hard is best for structural reasons and then greater care is required reinforcing joints, fitting parts and controlling the drying in order to avoid the clay warping and seams opening/cracking and pieces falling off.
     If pieces do fall off that’s ok too, joining bone dry pieces is often the trick. In China at the factories I’ve watched the make many different forms in large sections and join the sections dry with a clay mortar and trim  for final shape after assembly. The challenge working with the clay dry is obviously it needs to be correct size and shape as dry clay bends poorly. The advantage joining pieces when everything is dry are no stresses due to uneven moisture content in the clay, usually I mix up some thick slip from the same clay and a bit of paper fiber in a blender to the consistency I need to glue things together. The dry pieces cement quickly and the thick slip can be sculpted a little to fill gaps and transitions.
     
  23. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Gabby in Hand-building advice   
    Gabby, depends on what I’m making and just how I’m planning on finishing, trimming and those things. For larger pieces when I’m working wet so I can touch, shape and handle without the shape getting damaged I’ll use a heat gun to firm up the clay in critical places and leave things softer at the joints/join areas and where I’m planning other shaping or  more throwing, using a soft touch is also important. When working with wetter clay I can work the seam making everything one piece. Same thing throwing a tall cylinder sometimes  I do it in two sections throwing the bottom section normally, the top section is the same diameter thrown bottomless. Then just a tiny bit of firming with the heat gun before quickly inverting the second cylinder and securing It onto the top of the first cylinder when the pieces are joined air trapped inside helps support it structurally until the top batt is wired off from what is now the top of the tall cylinder. If the clay is still to wet to support its own weight use the heat gun to firm it up before wiring off the batt.  An additional advantage inverting the top section is any clay thickness in what is now the top of the cylinder can be thrown more if everything is still on center. I know one artist that makes very large round forms joining slabs of clay around different size beach balls, deflating the ball and removing it when the clay was firm enough to support its own weight.
    Sometimes leather hard is best for structural reasons and then greater care is required reinforcing joints, fitting parts and controlling the drying in order to avoid the clay warping and seams opening/cracking and pieces falling off.
     If pieces do fall off that’s ok too, joining bone dry pieces is often the trick. In China at the factories I’ve watched the make many different forms in large sections and join the sections dry with a clay mortar and trim  for final shape after assembly. The challenge working with the clay dry is obviously it needs to be correct size and shape as dry clay bends poorly. The advantage joining pieces when everything is dry are no stresses due to uneven moisture content in the clay, usually I mix up some thick slip from the same clay and a bit of paper fiber in a blender to the consistency I need to glue things together. The dry pieces cement quickly and the thick slip can be sculpted a little to fill gaps and transitions.
     
  24. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Gabby in Hand-building advice   
    Gabby, depends on what I’m making and just how I’m planning on finishing, trimming and those things. For larger pieces when I’m working wet so I can touch, shape and handle without the shape getting damaged I’ll use a heat gun to firm up the clay in critical places and leave things softer at the joints/join areas and where I’m planning other shaping or  more throwing, using a soft touch is also important. When working with wetter clay I can work the seam making everything one piece. Same thing throwing a tall cylinder sometimes  I do it in two sections throwing the bottom section normally, the top section is the same diameter thrown bottomless. Then just a tiny bit of firming with the heat gun before quickly inverting the second cylinder and securing It onto the top of the first cylinder when the pieces are joined air trapped inside helps support it structurally until the top batt is wired off from what is now the top of the tall cylinder. If the clay is still to wet to support its own weight use the heat gun to firm it up before wiring off the batt.  An additional advantage inverting the top section is any clay thickness in what is now the top of the cylinder can be thrown more if everything is still on center. I know one artist that makes very large round forms joining slabs of clay around different size beach balls, deflating the ball and removing it when the clay was firm enough to support its own weight.
    Sometimes leather hard is best for structural reasons and then greater care is required reinforcing joints, fitting parts and controlling the drying in order to avoid the clay warping and seams opening/cracking and pieces falling off.
     If pieces do fall off that’s ok too, joining bone dry pieces is often the trick. In China at the factories I’ve watched the make many different forms in large sections and join the sections dry with a clay mortar and trim  for final shape after assembly. The challenge working with the clay dry is obviously it needs to be correct size and shape as dry clay bends poorly. The advantage joining pieces when everything is dry are no stresses due to uneven moisture content in the clay, usually I mix up some thick slip from the same clay and a bit of paper fiber in a blender to the consistency I need to glue things together. The dry pieces cement quickly and the thick slip can be sculpted a little to fill gaps and transitions.
     
  25. Like
    1515art got a reaction from Rae Reich in Another pottery pricing thread   
    Made  my delivery this morning beautiful home up near Villa Montolvo in the Saratoga foothills, home was constructed over a hundred years ago and my client tells me as we tour the home she needs more work pointing to spots in each room where she wants multiple large sculptures. This is going to be a lot of work, starting with a fish sculpture several times larger than the one I just delivered...

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