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ceramichistorystudent

Japanese Shino & American Shino

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Hi everyone,

 

I am currently in the process of writing a paper on Shino ware for a university course and was wondering if I could possibly get some help from this wonderful forum. I will be comparing how shino was made then and now, but also need to look at its revitalization by the American potter in the mid 1970s. I am having difficulty getting my hands on sources that discuss the revitalization of the process, especially Wirt's contribution. There is a book titled American Shino - The Glaze of a thousand faces but it is nearly impossible to find even with university resources at my disposal (I am studying in Montreal, QC and no books can be found in Canada to borrow). Has any one read about the topic? Or have some insights they want to share? Or just have a copy of the book they want to lend out? :rolleyes: Any other sources that discusses this would be appreciated. Thank you in advance!

 

Regards,

Anne

 

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Guest JBaymore

Anne,

 

A tad busy right now... will try to get back to you later tonight or tomorrow.

 

best,

 

................john

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Wow, sounds like a good paper. I have been using shino since the mid 80's and relative to anything other than mixing sodium as my main flux or spodumene and getting recipes from teachers, friends and from books, I know very little about the actual history. My recollection is that many of the recipes I used were actually older raku family recipes or derivations of fat white glazes. Tweaking them out and of course firing them to cone 10 and up and the use of atmospheric kilns like wood or soda added quite a bit of character to the surface also.I do wish you luck and hope you post the final paper here on the forum. Best, Stephen

 

 

Hi everyone,

 

I am currently in the process of writing a paper on Shino ware for a university course and was wondering if I could possibly get some help from this wonderful forum. I will be comparing how shino was made then and now, but also need to look at its revitalization by the American potter in the mid 1970s. I am having difficulty getting my hands on sources that discuss the revitalization of the process, especially Wirt's contribution. There is a book titled American Shino - The Glaze of a thousand faces but it is nearly impossible to find even with university resources at my disposal (I am studying in Montreal, QC and no books can be found in Canada to borrow). Has any one read about the topic? Or have some insights they want to share? Or just have a copy of the book they want to lend out? :rolleyes: Any other sources that discusses this would be appreciated. Thank you in advance!

 

Regards,

Anne

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, sounds like a good paper. I have been using shino since the mid 80's and relative to anything other than mixing sodium as my main flux or spodumene and getting recipes from teachers, friends and from books, I know very little about the actual history. My recollection is that many of the recipes I used were actually older raku family recipes or derivations of fat white glazes. Tweaking them out and of course firing them to cone 10 and up and the use of atmospheric kilns like wood or soda added quite a bit of character to the surface also.I do wish you luck and hope you post the final paper here on the forum. Best, Stephen

 

 

 

Hi Stephen,

 

I would be pleased to post the paper when I am done if anyone would be interested. I am examining the history of shino from the 16th century, it's importance within the whole tea ceremony ritual and it's value. I will also be looking at how it was brough back in the late 19th century, developped and made popular again with Virginia Wirt's contribution. I will examine shino now, how it is used and how it has changed compared to how it originally started. I appreciate your insight, thanks!

 

Anne

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Anne,

 

Quick question relative to your possible research......... 日本語をã¯ãªã›ã¾ã™ã‹ã€‚

 

best,

 

..................john

 

PS: http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/0915829711

 

 

Hi John,

 

Unfortunately I don't speak Japanese but I am willing to possibly have these translated if the sources prove to be good ones. As for the American Shino book on Amazon, I'm afraid the price is a little steep for a lowly student. I am still trying to get it through the university so there is still hope! Thank you!

 

Anne

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Guest JBaymore

Anne,

 

I have not forgotten you. I have been distracted of all of my spare time by the horrible situation in Japan and communicating with folks over there.

 

I WILL get back to you.

 

best,

 

.............john

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Hi~

I have been doing some research myself on the shino glazes, and here is a bit of information that might help. There is a huge difference between the original Japanese or Korean shino and the North American shino. I use "American" in the true sense of the word, but there is even a difference between Canadian and US shino. To quote John Baymore, "Like American Raku, American Shino has evolved into a more flashy, dramatic, overstated version of its tea-ware brethren in Japan." (http://www.potters.org/subject13657.htm/, 29 May, 2011.)

 

Traditional Japanese shino is made specifically in Japan's Mino region. I was able to spend time with an amazing Master Potter from this region who uses the traditional shino. Yoshida Yoshihiko has worked his entire life making pottery, and learned from Living National Treasures Hamada Shoji and Arakawa Toyozo (1894-1985), working as an apprentice with Arakawa for 13 years. When I asked Yoshida about his shino, I was amazed to find that he used 100% local feldspar. It is worthwhile to look at Yoshida's work and history. Here in North America, I have found that shino formulas typically use only 60-85% feldspar. A good resource, if you take the time to wade through the material, is http://edouardbastarache.blogspot.com/ - he has a huge amount of material.

 

I could go on, but hopefully this might be enough help.

 

Jeffrey

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