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JoyB

low firing raku

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Most of my commercial raku glazes are borax based. They flux and flow around cone 07 to 05 (1800F - 1860F). In other words low bisque range. If I use a witness cone on the first firing round, an 06 will have a medium bend. I do have one glaze that fires a very pale blue at the lower temp, and fires to a tweedy mauve at 06 (overfired). Raku glaze temps can vary and depend on the flux used. I don't have a chart handy or I'd give you the centigrade temp the above equates to. Sorry.

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Most of my commercial raku glazes are borax based. They flux and flow around cone 07 to 05 (1800F - 1860F). In other words low bisque range. If I use a witness cone on the first firing round, an 06 will have a medium bend. I do have one glaze that fires a very pale blue at the lower temp, and fires to a tweedy mauve at 06 (overfired). Raku glaze temps can vary and depend on the flux used. I don't have a chart handy or I'd give you the centigrade temp the above equates to. Sorry.

 

 

 

Thank you Idaho Potter, I have only ever fired Raku within a group of people who knew what they were doing and I just helped.

 

I have been given a very tiny 'enamelling kiln' which fires to 950c, which I think is roughy 1742f. I like making Raku jewellery and thought it could be fun to try it on my own if I could adapt the glazes to fit this temp. I also like to make my own stoneware glazes which I fire in a top loading elctric kiln to 1280c - 2336f?, but dont have much knowledge of it all other than following a recipe, but I have read that I could lower the temp by varying the flux so I wondered if I could do the same with a raku glaze?

 

I also have a small very old top loading electric kiln which I would like to eventually convert to a Raku kiln, but in the mean time (I have been going to do it for years and just never had the time) I must learn more about Raku ...... as well as rolleyes.gif

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Most of my commercial raku glazes are borax based. They flux and flow around cone 07 to 05 (1800F - 1860F). In other words low bisque range. If I use a witness cone on the first firing round, an 06 will have a medium bend. I do have one glaze that fires a very pale blue at the lower temp, and fires to a tweedy mauve at 06 (overfired). Raku glaze temps can vary and depend on the flux used. I don't have a chart handy or I'd give you the centigrade temp the above equates to. Sorry.

 

 

 

Idaho Potter, I would like to add that your reply was very helpful, Thank you again

Joy

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JoyB, There are some remarkable books out there on firing raku (Western style). Most of the color flashing happens during the post-firing reduction phase, and timing on getting the object from kiln to smoke pot is important so the glaze doesn't become oxidized. Steve Branfman's book RAKU: A Practical Approach is a good place to start. It's readily available and I believe it has recently be revised so it will be up-to-date.

 

I've found that raku glazes are serendipitous all the time. I underfire, refire, overfire and yes there have been disasters, but for the most part it is exciting and fun. Learn the basics from reading books and then experiment and explore. Have fun with it: layer glazes; leave areas unglazed (so you have some black for contrast); use underglazes and cover with clear crackle; it's all good.

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JoyB, There are some remarkable books out there on firing raku (Western style). Most of the color flashing happens during the post-firing reduction phase, and timing on getting the object from kiln to smoke pot is important so the glaze doesn't become oxidized. Steve Branfman's book RAKU: A Practical Approach is a good place to start. It's readily available and I believe it has recently be revised so it will be up-to-date.

 

I've found that raku glazes are serendipitous all the time. I underfire, refire, overfire and yes there have been disasters, but for the most part it is exciting and fun. Learn the basics from reading books and then experiment and explore. Have fun with it: layer glazes; leave areas unglazed (so you have some black for contrast); use underglazes and cover with clear crackle; it's all good.

 

 

 

I always thought it would be fun but you have made it sound even better! As I'm also a watercolour artist I love 'happy accidents' and the unexpected! So it looks like I shall be having fun. I have taken your advice and ordered Steve Branfman's book, And a book on Raku glazes!!. I think it's nearly time to look at converting that old kiln that's in the garden as I think the Raku bug may get hold and I think I can feel alot of sleepless nights coming up due to a full and happy brain!

 

I thank you again Idaho potter, for those great tips. I have made notes and I'm off to explore!!

Joy

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I am becoming increasingly interested in Raku firing/glazes. I have dabbled but not much success. most of my success is not glazed ~ naked raku ~ horse hair decorated. Recently used Ferric Chloride over horse hair after firing and have had some success. Would love to discuss with others their experiences especially using glazes an firing techniques. There is not much info on the net I would like to share with others if interested. see Ferric chloride over horse hair raku firing pics here

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How low is low temperature in Raku firing? 950c? or is that not possible? If it is, has anyone any recipes? If not, what is the ideal temp?

many thanks

Joy

I have noticed that many European raku glazes seem to fire lower around ^08. Most glazes I have used in the US have a maturing temperature about ^06 (1825) and ^05.

Here is a temperature chart.

http://www.miniworlddolls.com/evenheat/ConeInfo.htm

 

Marcia

 

 

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How low is low temperature in Raku firing? 950c? or is that not possible? If it is, has anyone any recipes? If not, what is the ideal temp?

many thanks

Joy

I have noticed that many European raku glazes seem to fire lower around ^08. Most glazes I have used in the US have a maturing temperature about ^06 (1825) and ^05.

Here is a temperature chart.

http://www.miniworld...at/ConeInfo.htm

 

Marcia

 

Thank you for the link Marcia, very informative, those cone temps can be quite tricky to remember and I had no idea they relied on so many factors ie: rate of getting to temp etc. So I shall read and try and digest.

I have just bought a Raku recipe book and the temperatures vary considerably so I think I just have to start playing with some low ones and recording my finds.

Cheers Joy

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