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#21 Isculpt

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

Hi Oldlady. 

 

I'm using Highwater Clay's Raku, cone 06-6.  I'm sure different effects would result from different clays.

 

The standing figure "Green Mansions" is bisque fired, then one coat of Mayco's "Stoneware Wash"  is applied diluted 1:1 with water. That is the specific glaze name given to it (also number 304, I think). It is then wiped off and fired to 4. (That glaze can be fired 06 to 10.)  In hindsight, I think I should have diluted it more.  It would have been easier to apply and maybe it would have stayed in the crevices rather than covering some nearby areas (the feathers' high ridges to be exact).  I'm afraid the color tone in the image isn't entirely true, because it is under fluorescent lighting.

 

For comparison, the head "Memories Become Bouquets" is bisque fired, then coated with copper carbonate mixed with water.  The excess is wiped off and the piece is fired to cone 5. (That's an arbitrary choice; I get almost the same results firing to cone 06 as to cone 6.)  Using copper carbonate wash on earthenware gives me a more iron look - what I call metallic - instead of mainly just brown color, as here.

 

I wasn't able to post pictures of the two pieces fully finished here, but for the finished sculptures, which have been washed with greatly diluted acrylics, see the next post. 

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#22 Isculpt

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:36 PM

Oldlady, as you can see, neither of the dark washes was obscured by the acrylics, although the Mayco wash is definitely more assertive than the copper carbonate.  Copper carbonate used this way is a little unpredictable, but I have added more cc to the water and gotten a darker effect, although not as dark as the Mayco "Stoneware Wash".  On the other hand, the Mayco "Stoneware Wash" may give a lighter effect if greatly diluted.  Time for more experiments!

.

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#23 Isculpt

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 10:06 PM

Oldlady, I forgot to answer your other question. The standing figure is about 25 inches...and the head is about 1.5 x life size.

 

Jayne



#24 Babs

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 12:08 AM

Jayne the eyes are phenomenal!

Are you seeking a metallic finish

Are you bisquing then applying to refire? Or to raw ware?

Sponging stuff off bisque ware can be effective, can sponge as hard as you like without destroyiin g texture, but it also can affect the colour of the exposed clay.

Just wondering for you!

ANd loving your work

A mixture of 3 parts manganese dioxide to 1 part black copper oxide plus water applied on clay or glaze gives a bronze metaliic finish which can be pretty attractive, be careful with the mang. though at least you know you're using it!



#25 Isculpt

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 10:42 PM

Hi Babs.  Yes, I'm wanting a wash that has a metallic or "iron" look to it.  And it has to be applied to bisqueware since raw ware would likely lose a few details when I start rubbing & washing away excess wash.  There are times when I can't really scrub even the bisqueware because of areas that are too fragile.  I just bought a bottle of Amaco manganese dioxide wash, but it provided nothing but a dark, almost black color -- no sheen or iron look to it at all.  I'll give the black copper oxide and manganese dioxide mixture a try after my next visit to the clay store. Thanks!

Jayne



#26 Babs

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 11:00 PM

Could also apply a glaze to your liking and wash it off unwanted areas. Can catch and reuse washed off glaze by evaporation if you like.



#27 Isculpt

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:18 AM

Could also apply a glaze to your liking and wash it off unwanted areas. Can catch and reuse washed off glaze by evaporation if you like.

Babs, thanks for mentioning that fact.  I've been experimenting with glazes on limited parts of my sculptures, and  I've been wondering about that possibility. You're a mind reader!



#28 Benzine

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:20 PM

I've done something similar with glaze.  I had a commission, and along with neutral tones, they din't want the glaze to be overly glossy.  All the glazes I have are, at least somewhat glossy, so I simply applied them normally, then took a damp sponge and wiped some off like you would with a oxide stain.  I found the effect to be quite nice.


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#29 Isculpt

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 09:03 PM

Clearly, it's time to bisque a bunch more test tiles and see what effects I get with glazes sponged off, washed off,  and wiped off.  Time to make a WHOLE BUNCH of test tiles!






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