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Up Cycling Old Glaze


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#1 MMB

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:03 PM

So I've been dabbling in glass as of late since clay is on hold due to atlanta clay being unable to obtain the raw materials I need. Mainly because of the weather. Fed up with that I was happy that axner has all I need. 600lb order coming Monday :) so im in need of space. Being I have a ton of low fire glazes from when I bought my kiln I'm now looking at ways to dispose of them. I've been successful with glass melts in plaster/silica molds and was curious about firing my glazes in them then turning around to crush them down for colored frit or even melt them into usable shapes. I know I might be getting into a mess of different co efficients. I did a test already but goofed and had a nasty over flow. I'd propose this to glass forum but have found they shy away once clay content is mentioned. Yet after a glaze is fired it is essential all glass correct? I would like to hear others opinions on my idea. Not recycling , nor disposing, but repurposing.

#2 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:09 PM

Without specifics, pretty much, yes. The varying CoEs of the materials is the largest issue at play.


In the case of a (non-crystalline) gloss glaze, yes the glaze is glass when fired. A matte glaze is not.


To explain, let's talk about the contemporary definition of glass. Glass: a super-cooled liquid. Essentially, when materials freeze quickly enough, they have the potential to become a glass if the molecules are unable to re-arrange into a crystalline structure. The cooling curve is different for each set of materials, but it's possible to make glass out of individual materials such as copper or pretty much anything else with the proper equipment. The only reason I mention this is because the chemistry is REALLY important to figuring out what you have, how it will behave, and so on....


Casual science is fine, just don't go in with high expectations.....

#3 MMB

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:28 AM

Why thank you. That was a very quick yet informative response. I decided to write the post on the way into work so I wasnt sure if my thoughts were conveyed properly. It was an idea and I plan to test test test. I thought Id wait to post something later but sometimes ideas just need to be spat out from time to time.



#4 Benzine

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 08:49 AM

Colby, glass is not actually considered a liquid of any type. It is considered an amorphous solid, due to its lack of a crystalline structure. Glass being a super cooled liquid, is one of those theories, that continues to propagate itself. It is believed that it all started, when people looked at old windows, and saw they were thicker at the bottom. The conclusion was, the glass had slowly flowed to the bottom over the centuries. The truth is that, when those windows were made, it was just really difficult to make glass of a consistent thickness.

There is still some movement of the atoms in glass, because they are slowly flowing into a more stable formation. But because they have more organization than a liquid, they aren't classified as such. Basically glass is Judd Nelson's character, from Breakfast Club; a rebel, that doesn't fit in and does what it wants....
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"




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