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Ceramics Glue?


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#1 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:42 AM

I have been planning to make a sculpture by my driveway entrance out of the ugly non sellable pots I have. I am trying to figure out what would be the best way to bond them together that would be secure during drastic temperatures. We get as hot as 105 degrees, and as cold as -40 wind chills. Does anyone have a recommendation ?


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"To me the greatest thing is to live beauty in our daily life and to crowd every moment with things of beauty.  It is then, and then only that  the art of the people as a whole is endowed with it's richest significance.  For it's products are those made by great a many craftsmen for the mass of the people, and the moment this art declines the life of the nation  is removed far away from beauty.  So long as beauty abides in only in a few articles created by a few geniuses, the kingdom of beauty is nowhere near realization."                                                                                 - Bernard Leach 

#2 JBaymore

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:47 AM

J-B Weld epoxy.

 

best,

 

..............john


John Baymore
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

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#3 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 12:47 PM

Thank you John :) 


~ Namaste ~

 

Home studio potter 

 

Shanel Pottery 

www.shanelpottery.com

www.facebook.com/shanelspottery 

 

 

 

"To me the greatest thing is to live beauty in our daily life and to crowd every moment with things of beauty.  It is then, and then only that  the art of the people as a whole is endowed with it's richest significance.  For it's products are those made by great a many craftsmen for the mass of the people, and the moment this art declines the life of the nation  is removed far away from beauty.  So long as beauty abides in only in a few articles created by a few geniuses, the kingdom of beauty is nowhere near realization."                                                                                 - Bernard Leach 

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 05:04 PM

I second that J-B weld-its comes is slow set or fast set-the fast set is thicker and easy to use on many things -the slow(regular) set is thinner and runnier.

I use them both depending on the need. I tend to use the fast set more in ceramcs as its goes off very soon.

Mark


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#5 perkolator

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 03:04 PM

I like PC-7 (dark gray) or PC-11 epoxy (off white) slightly better than JB Weld if you can find it.  They are very comparable to one another, but I feel it's stronger than JB Weld, especially after time (I've seen JB get brittle).  Also bonds to certain materials better than JBW, like plastic or anything flexible.  It's definitely more difficult to find and not as well-known it seems.  usually only old-school hardware stores carry it (local ACE Hardware seems to always carry it) as well as online.  Either one will work though especially for ceramics, the only downfall is that they both take a long time to setup...but will provide significantly better bond than anything that sets up/cures in less than 12-24hrs.  They are strong enough that after they are cured on ceramic, when you re-break the object you'll have clay stuck to the epoxy proving the clay breaks first.






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