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Biglou13

Slica (Ish) Pebbles As Clay Inclusions?

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As a by product of silica mining i retained some what I call "silica pebbles" while the majority is silica, there can e other products included, sharks teeth, fools gold, other? These are from a strain of alluvial deposits from the North Carolina area.

 

I would like to use these as clay inclusions.

 

I will be testing at both cone 6 ish 0x electric, And wood fired cone 13 (ish) Reduction (ish).

 

granite is a known performer in wood fired,clay. I know there may be some quartz inversions, and cristabolite issues.

 

 

What say you?

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I know my post is of no help, but I am interested when it comes to your results. I live close to Elberton, GA "Granite Capital of the World" and the "sheds" as they call them that cut and make everything have plenty of excess dust. I know many dont care about the shards and have been known to let people take away a truck load. I would like to hopefully acquire some to test in glazes, maybe even bodies. I also work in Greenville, SC and there is a European dude that runs a granite shop three doors down.

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Granite is beautiful in wood fired.

 

I've see pics of it in fired in gas.

 

Google shigariki clay, shigariki pottery.

 

I've used chicken grit but am interested in trying a smaller particle.

 

Jrg is kinda doing the same thing u are.

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 I live close to Elberton, GA "Granite Capital of the World"..........

 

The State of New Hampshire might like to differ wih that title ..... ;)  Hi from "The Granite State".

 

The geology of the whole state here pretty much sits on a bedrock granite.

 

best,

 

........................john

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One of the things that I have my students in my ceramic materioals classes do is just go out most anywhere there is dirt on the ground, dig up some, wedge it in varying proportions into clay (proper testing methods) and then work with it and fire it.  This does not have to be all "official" and specialized materials.

 

Clay is "pulverized planet".  Industrial preparation of western clay bodies takes out all the impurities......... just go put some back in and see what you get.

 

If you like it ........ use it.  If you don't...... find a different source of "dirt".

 

Test, test, test.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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Haha John. I was in no way quoting that with any level of pride. That is what they like to call themselves, its actually a huge awful sign once you come into the extremely small town.

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If the pebbles are silica, they probably won't melt at cone 5-6. Feldspar and mica will melt at these cones. Most basalt, pumice, and scoria can melt around cone 6. The larger the pebble, the higher temp required to melt. The deeper in the clay body the pebbles lives, the higher the temp or longer the firing time at cone 5-6 is needed to melt.

 

I have taken John,s GREAT advice about digging and adding local materials to my clay bodies. Since I live in the West, I have found mine tailing a great resourse of unusual materials.

 

Jed

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I've found some sources of silty soil/clay that the indigenous people here in north Florida made ancient pottery with. And will be taking sensei John b's assignment to task

 

Might as well just grab some dirt from the back yard an see what happens

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