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Two-Tone Effect


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#21 Paroan

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 07:16 PM

I just looked up the obvara firing.  very interesting but a little too advanced still for me.



#22 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 08:25 PM

Here is the thread from the topic aesthetics. There are three. You tubes on there about the firing. the recipe is also there in the discussion. It is one of the most simple techniques I have ever done. no glaze, no smoke. Things happen before your eyes. It is a potter/pyro perfect experience.
Am having trouble pasting the link. Go to Obvara firing techniques under the topic Aesthetics in the Forum.
http://ceramicartsda...ring-technique/
Did it! Go to this link. Up in Smoke has been doing a lot of this too.

marcia

#23 bciskepottery

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 09:21 PM

Couple of ideas for you . . .

 

You could start with a clay body that fires dark brown or black, apply a white slip to the outside, then apply your sodium silicate and stretch the form.  That would give you the dark clay showing in the exposed cracks and white on the surface.  I think if you look closely at the first picture of the pots that you cited as inspiration, that is what the potter may have done.  For final firing, you could forego glazing altogether and just apply a wash of soda ash or ferro frit to give a sheen to the surface.

 

Another approach, as suggested by Chris, would be to apply a red iron oxide or black iron oxide wash to the pot after it was thrown, then clean the oxide wash off the smooth surfaces.  Bisque fire --  that seals the oxide wash better to the clay body.  Again, I would forego the glazing and just apply a soda ash wash or ferro frit wash to give the surface some sheen.

 

I use a combination of white slip, rutile wash (rutile in some water), and black underglaze to create a surface texture for some of my vases.  I apply the slip and colorants to the clay while building the forms, then bisque.  For glazing, I leave the exterior plain and just let it fire naturally.

 

Attached File  stone_vase_1.jpg   149.78KB   0 downloads



#24 Paroan

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 09:39 PM

So are you saying to apply the oxide wash once the pot dries but before it is fired the first time? I did not realize you can apply these before firing.

I know you are saying to forgo any type of glaze after that but I do prefer to be able to create various color effects.  I could try it both ways to see what I prefer.



#25 bciskepottery

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 10:14 PM

You can apply an oxide wash at various times . . . wet clay, leatherhard, dry greenware, or to bisque.  When working with slips, I prefer to apply them at the wet stage and develop the patterns, texture and effect using brushes, sponges, and other tools and overlapping and blending the colorants and slip.  But you could apply them to your bisque if that is the stage the pots are in.  You can get your color effects just using the oxide washes, or underglaze washes; you don't need to depend on glazes for adding color. 



#26 Paroan

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 10:26 PM

Would you happen to be able to post a picture of a piece you have done using just the oxide wash?  I am having a hard time picturing this.



#27 bciskepottery

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 06:04 AM

Attached File  tall_kohiki_2.jpg   176.1KB   0 downloads

 

Vase made from Laguna Dark Brown clay, with white slip added.  Oxide wash applied at bisque.  Fired to Cone 10 in natural gas kiln.



#28 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 06:28 AM

bciskepottery,
That is a beautiful piece.
Marcia

#29 Paroan

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:14 AM

Yes, quite beautiful!   Thanks so much for all the advice.  I greatly appreciate it.



#30 PeterH

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:16 AM

Paroan,

 

Video of one way of applying an oxide wash to emphasise texture, note the importance of wiping back.

[You can get more control wiping back with a moist sponge.] 

 

If you want a more graduated effect, let it dry a little and wipe back with a damp sponge or one of those

green plastic pan scrubs. The oxide comes off more slowly, and preferentially at the higher spots.

 

And a few pix.

http://www.blog.bead.../07/oxides.html

http://plants-potter...01_archive.html

 

Regards, Peter

 

 

 

Regards, Peter



#31 Paroan

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:54 AM

Thanks Peter!!






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