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#1 Nelly

Nelly

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 04:17 PM

Dear All,

I just wanted to let the group know that I just went out to my studio to glaze a large batch of pots using my Arbuckle glaze. Not sure what happened but am guessing that I put in too much water in during the initial mixing as it was pretty runny. It would not adhere without being transparent on the pot even with a 5 second dunk.

At the point of me using this glaze, it has sat for about two month and has been sieved twice. It was mixed well today before I started to consider alternative ways to thicken the mixture.

To make a long story short, the addition of just a small amount of epson salts mixed with some glaze (in the same way you would thicken a soup) worked beautifully. I added it bit-by-bit and voila, it passed the glove or finger nail test.

While there are still some drips on my pieces from my dunking technique, I know I can work with them.

I learned this technique on THIS forum. Thank you to who ever posted this information. I think someone once mentioned using molasses but am not sure how this would work.

No need to respond. I just wanted to let the group know that valuable information is transmitted on this forum that I DEFINITELY USE.

Nelly

#2 Pres

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:59 PM

Dear All,

I just wanted to let the group know that I just went out to my studio to glaze a large batch of pots using my Arbuckle glaze. Not sure what happened but am guessing that I put in too much water in during the initial mixing as it was pretty runny. It would not adhere without being transparent on the pot even with a 5 second dunk.

At the point of me using this glaze, it has sat for about two month and has been sieved twice. It was mixed well today before I started to consider alternative ways to thicken the mixture.

To make a long story short, the addition of just a small amount of epson salts mixed with some glaze (in the same way you would thicken a soup) worked beautifully. I added it bit-by-bit and voila, it passed the glove or finger nail test.

While there are still some drips on my pieces from my dunking technique, I know I can work with them.

I learned this technique on THIS forum. Thank you to who ever posted this information. I think someone once mentioned using molasses but am not sure how this would work.

No need to respond. I just wanted to let the group know that valuable information is transmitted on this forum that I DEFINITELY USE.

Nelly


Hi Nelly, I remember the discussion, but am sure I didn't give you the tip-just confirmed it. I am glad you used the epsom salts as if you had used anything organic, and left it sit as long as before you would really have a stink. Growing mold happens with organic additives like gum arabic or molasses.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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