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John255

Steven Hill's Firing Schedule For Bisque?

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Does anyone have Steven Hill's glaze firing schedule for bisque?

The schedule in his article is prolonged in the beginning because his work is single fired.

Thanks.

John255

 

 

 

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From summer of 2011 his schedule for glaze firing if he used bisqued not raw pots:

 

segment 1 - 200F/hr - 220 - hold 30 mins if you have raw cone packs in the firing

 

segment 2 - 400F/hr - 2100 - 0 hold

 

segment 3 - 100F/hr - 2170 - 30 to 60 min hold until ^6 falls, tweaking required

 

segment 4 - 9999F/hr - 1700 - 0 hold

 

segment 5 - 50F/hr - 1600 - 60 min hold

 

segment 6 - 50F/hr - 1500 - Off

 

He says that since kilns are calibrated differently and he doesn't use bisque pots that the above schedule would be some approximation of what he would use.

 

Min

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From summer of 2011 his schedule for glaze firing if he used bisqued not raw pots:

 

segment 1 - 200F/hr - 220 - hold 30 mins if you have raw cone packs in the firing

 

segment 2 - 400F/hr - 2100 - 0 hold

 

segment 3 - 100F/hr - 2170 - 30 to 60 min hold until ^6 falls, tweaking required

 

segment 4 - 9999F/hr - 1700 - 0 hold

 

segment 5 - 50F/hr - 1600 - 60 min hold

 

segment 6 - 50F/hr - 1500 - Off

 

He says that since kilns are calibrated differently and he doesn't use bisque pots that the above schedule would be some approximation of what he would use.

 

Min

 

I've never been to one of his workshops but have wondered why the speedy cool from 2170 to 1700. Seems like that is when it would be best to slow down so mattes can develop instead of where the glaze is no longer molten (or just barely). I've never seen anything explaining that in articles he has written so just wondering if he explains this in workshops.

 

Jim

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Thank you Min for taking the time to post the sched.

That looks about right to me.

John255

 

Jim,

I have exactly the same question that you have.

I just did a search and it seems SH may be following the work of Carol Marians: The Many Faces Of Iron.

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/ceramic-glaze-recipes/glaze-chemistry-ceramic-glaze-recipes-2/the-many-faces-of-iron-an-exploration-in-cooling/

This study shows prolonged holding around 1600F turns normally dark brown Iron to bright red colors.

I'm just starting to look into SH's firing methods for his very attractive glazes.

I feel sure SH must have run some test of his own being the reliable fellow that he is.

Hope others will chime in on this giving their experience with such long firings.

John255

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Thank you Min for taking the time to post the sched.

That looks about right to me.

John255

 

Jim,

I have exactly the same question that you have.

I just did a search and it seems SH may be following the work of Carol Marians: The Many Faces Of Iron.

http://ceramicartsda...ion-in-cooling/

This study shows prolonged holding around 1600F turns normally dark brown Iron to bright red colors.

I'm just starting to look into SH's firing methods for his very attractive glazes.

I feel sure SH must have run some test of his own being the reliable fellow that he is.

Hope others will chime in on this giving their experience with such long firings.

John255

 

 

Thanks, John! I haven't had time to read it carefully yet but it is interesting and looks like it will answer my question. I appreciate you posting it. Here is an example of the glazes I get using a cool down very similar to Hill's: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?app=gallery&module=images&section=viewimage&img=2580

 

Jim

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Jim,

All I can say is "wow", and that seems inadequate.

Gorgeous pieces!

I've seen and admired your work before finding your post on the forum.

Are you at liberty to say if your slow firing schedule differs from SH's?

Thanks.

John255

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Jim,

All I can say is "wow", and that seems inadequate.

Gorgeous pieces!

I've seen and admired your work before finding your post on the forum.

Are you at liberty to say if your slow firing schedule differs from SH's?

Thanks.

John255

 

 

John, it is obviously a variation of Hill's. Very close to what you posted (9999 meaning as fast as possible):

9999 to 2100

75 to 2190 hold 60 mins

9999 to 1700

50 to 1600 hold 30 mins

50 to 1500

Off

 

The cup pictured only has 4 glazes outside plus the liner glaze overlapping the top.

Silky White liner poured then dipped so that it overlaps top.

I spray Strontium Crystal Magic Warm base coat over all thicker in middle and thinner at bottom and top.

Then over almost all Juicy Fruit Iron (with Spanish Iron subed for RIO) varying the thickness to accent the shape of the pot.

Then Hill's Water Color Green is sprayed on with a detail gun or airbrush in a spiral.

Then a Turquoise is sprayed with detail or airbrush in spiral under WCG.

 

Let me know if you need any of these glazes.

 

Thanks for comment.

 

Jim

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Jim,

All I can say is "wow", and that seems inadequate.

Gorgeous pieces!

I've seen and admired your work before finding your post on the forum.

Are you at liberty to say if your slow firing schedule differs from SH's?

Thanks.

John255

 

 

John, it is obviously a variation of Hill's. Very close to what you posted (9999 meaning as fast as possible):

9999 to 2100

75 to 2190 hold 60 mins

9999 to 1700

50 to 1600 hold 30 mins

50 to 1500

Off

 

The cup pictured only has 4 glazes outside plus the liner glaze overlapping the top.

Silky White liner poured then dipped so that it overlaps top.

I spray Strontium Crystal Magic Warm base coat over all thicker in middle and thinner at bottom and top.

Then over almost all Juicy Fruit Iron (with Spanish Iron subed for RIO) varying the thickness to accent the shape of the pot.

Then Hill's Water Color Green is sprayed on with a detail gun or airbrush in a spiral.

Then a Turquoise is sprayed with detail or airbrush in spiral under WCG.

 

Let me know if you need any of these glazes.

 

Thanks for comment.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Jim, do you get crazing with the SCM and the Water Colour Green? I have tried both on 3 claybodies and they all crazed when I did a boiling water/ice water fit test. I also found Hill's Apricot glaze crazed badly. Hill's Satin White doesn't craze for me though.

 

Min

 

 

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Jim, do you get crazing with the SCM and the Water Colour Green? I have tried both on 3 claybodies and they all crazed when I did a boiling water/ice water fit test. I also found Hill's Apricot glaze crazed badly. Hill's Satin White doesn't craze for me though.

 

Min

 

 

 

 

Min, I mainly use it to accent or modify other glazes so it is a thin spray on top of 2 or 3 other glazes so it doesn't craze. It does crackle where thick. I use it on cone 5 B-Mix fired to cone 6-7. Here is a different use of it. Here is is on Frost glazed with a thick dipping of clear then a feathering spray of WCG. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?app=gallery&module=images&section=viewimage&img=2581

 

Jim

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Jim, do you get crazing with the SCM and the Water Colour Green? I have tried both on 3 claybodies and they all crazed when I did a boiling water/ice water fit test. I also found Hill's Apricot glaze crazed badly. Hill's Satin White doesn't craze for me though.

 

Min

 

 

 

 

Min, I mainly use it to accent or modify other glazes so it is a thin spray on top of 2 or 3 other glazes so it doesn't craze. It does crackle where thick. I use it on cone 5 B-Mix fired to cone 6-7. Here is a different use of it. Here is is on Frost glazed with a thick dipping of clear then a feathering spray of WCG. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2581

 

Jim

 

 

Thanks Jim, gorgeous pots!

 

Min

 

 

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Jim,

Thank you very much for sharing your firing sched.

This info will be valuable in comparing results on my first firing using SH formulas.

I bought the SH's CD and found it very well done.

For my first mock firing with this new kiln I selected 2180F for a target temp to start the hold for one hour.

This resulted in a slight over firing with ^6 down flat.

It seems more logical to adjust the ^5 target temp to allow a full hour of soak at ^6 rather than cutting the soak time short to prent over firing.

Your pots are beautiful and very encouraging for potential electric firing results. Thanks again.

Regards,

John255

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Jim,

Thank you very much for sharing your firing sched.

This info will be valuable in comparing results on my first firing using SH formulas.

I bought the SH's CD and found it very well done.

For my first mock firing with this new kiln I selected 2180F for a target temp to start the hold for one hour.

This resulted in a slight over firing with ^6 down flat.

It seems more logical to adjust the ^5 target temp to allow a full hour of soak at ^6 rather than cutting the soak time short to prent over firing.

Your pots are beautiful and very encouraging for potential electric firing results. Thanks again.

Regards,

John255

 

 

The CD is a good one but they made a couple of mistakes on the PDF file of recipes, so be careful. I just looked for it and can't find it but I corrected one or two recipes. I can look harder if you need that info.

 

Jiim

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Jim,

Yes, thank you.

I'll be glazing tomorrow using SCM warm as a base white.

If you know of any error in that formula from the PDF please let me know.

This will be an experimental trial run using color layered glazes of my own concoctions .

Regards,

John255

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Jim,

Yes, thank you.

I'll be glazing tomorrow using SCM warm as a base white.

If you know of any error in that formula from the PDF please let me know.

This will be an experimental trial run using color layered glazes of my own concoctions .

Regards,

John255

 

 

 

I think that one is okay. Here's what I have for SCM Warm

Custer ... 39.6

Whiting ... 14.9

Strontium Carb ... 10.9

EPK ... 12.9

Frit 3124 ... 3.9

Lithium Carb ... 3.9

Titanium Diox ... 11.9

Bentonite ... 2.0

Yellow Iron Ox ... 2.5

 

But, SCM warm is not white because of the Yellow Iron Ox. SCM cool is white. I think just leaving out the yellow iron could be called SCM cool but the recipe I have for it splits the Custer in above recipe into 19.4 Custer & 19.4 Neph Sy.

 

Jim

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Min, I mainly use it to accent or modify other glazes so it is a thin spray on top of 2 or 3 other glazes so it doesn't craze. It does crackle where thick. I use it on cone 5 B-Mix fired to cone 6-7. Here is a different use of it. Here is is on Frost glazed with a thick dipping of clear then a feathering spray of WCG. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?app=gallery&module=images&section=viewimage&img=2581

 

Jim

 

 

Sorry to butt in on this discussion as I am just learning and its way beyond me at this point BUT...

off center your stuff is absolutely incredible. I love the white and blue. My question is what is WCG? Thank you I want to make note of the colors you used so one day I can hopefully try and capture the same tones.

 

Terry

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Jim,

OK, got it!

I will use 2% yellow iron.

I've already mixed the batch, but think I'm within 1% of the numbers you supplied.

I always round up/down the fractions anyway.

Thank you so much for your input.

John255

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Min, I mainly use it to accent or modify other glazes so it is a thin spray on top of 2 or 3 other glazes so it doesn't craze. It does crackle where thick. I use it on cone 5 B-Mix fired to cone 6-7. Here is a different use of it. Here is is on Frost glazed with a thick dipping of clear then a feathering spray of WCG. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2581

 

Jim

 

 

Sorry to butt in on this discussion as I am just learning and its way beyond me at this point BUT...

off center your stuff is absolutely incredible. I love the white and blue. My question is what is WCG? Thank you I want to make note of the colors you used so one day I can hopefully try and capture the same tones.

 

Terry

 

 

Thank you, Terry. WCG stands for Water Color Green. It isn't a good stand-alone glaze because it has too much copper to be completely stable (It shouldn't be used on a surface touching food) and it crackles where thick when used alone on most clays. So, basically what you have is a lousy glaze that is very good for adding a touch of color to another glaze--aquamarine in oxidation and red in reduction. The only commercial glaze I use is a clear by Opulence called 125 Clear. I buy it in large quantities dry. I'd prefer not to use any commercial glazes but I have never been able to mix up a clear this nice, having this huge range of temps and being so forgiving of application. So, for the white and blue, that is cone 6 Frost porcelain (wonderfully translucent) with WCG sprayed over the clear so that it feathers out. Here is the recipe for WCG. I hope this is helpful. Let me know if you have any other questions or need other recipes.

 

Water Color Green (cone 6)

Custer ... 47.8

Silica ... 16.9

Lithium ... 4.0

Frit 3124 ... 5.0

Whiting ... 16.0

Strontium ... 7.5

Bentonite ... 2.9

Copper Carb ... 8.0

 

Jim

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Jim,

Please mention the qualities you find in Opulence Clear 125 that you are fond of.

I've found most formulas of ^6 clear produce far too much gloss to the point of distraction.

John255

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The Hannah's Fake Ash recipe that is on the CD is goofy. I don't believe the silica 22.7 should be in there. Original HFA had slightly more redart and no 3195, I can understand those modifications but not the addition of silica.

 

 

Min

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The Hannah's Fake Ash recipe that is on the CD is goofy. I don't believe the silica 22.7 should be in there. Original HFA had slightly more redart and no 3195, I can understand those modifications but not the addition of silica.

 

 

Min

 

 

Yes, that is the one that is incorrect. There may be another. I'm sorry but I can't find the disc or the pdf so can't be more helpful right now.

 

Jim

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Jim,

Please mention the qualities you find in Opulence Clear 125 that you are fond of.

I've found most formulas of ^6 clear produce far too much gloss to the point of distraction.

John255

 

 

I don't think you would like it, then, because that is one of the good points for me. I like a clear on very translucent porcelain to be very glossy. It is glossy. Very clear. Very forgiving in application in that it works thick or thin and drips disappear. I fire it to cone 6-7 but it looks the same at 5 and I think below and I've actually put a test in an anagama that got up to cone 13 and I couldn't believe that it worked there, too. (I have to re-test that because I still can't believe it didn't burn off.) Doesn't hardpan badly. Is delicious in vodka.

 

Jim

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Jim,

It is because of your interesting conversation with Min that I'm using my own colorants.

Wow, for 125 having the widest range I've ever heard of, but it dosen't exceed the range of your drink additive.

I've heard kaolin in 7UP is excellent when you can't get to a bathroom after eating Mexican.

I had no idea this morning after putting on my socks I would learn any of this.

Thanks to all.

John255

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If you need a low expansion clear gloss that doesn't show drips, craze or hardpan and is okay @ ^5 through 7:

 

G1215U

 

Silica - 26

 

EPK - 14

 

Wollastonite - 14.5

 

3249 - 20

 

Minspar - 24

 

total: 98.5

 

If you need to raise the expansion add nepsy, I have added up to 8% with no discernable difference in the glaze. Subbing out magnesium carb in the formula results in bubbles in the glaze, the 3249 is necessary.

 

Min

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Thank you off center I am now the proud owner of my very first glaze notebook with the watercolor green glaze recipe and notes written in it. I might never get brave enough to use it but its there and who knows what the future will bring. I even made note about what you said its properties are and that you like to use it with opulence clear. This is so cool!

 

I'd actually gone by your gallery a little bit earlier today and seen your pieces and was astounded at the colors. The green swirled colors blend so well with your shapes on the cups its perfect symmetry I can't even picture them with a different glaze they look like they should be those colors. I actually saw my first piece of bisque fired lizella clay the other day when I was watching my teacher unload the studio kiln. I must say your piece is worlds away and you really utilize the red of the clay well with the other colors of the cup and holder. I especially like the pieces you showed there as well as here with the white and blue and thought wow I wonder how he did that and I doubt I'll ever get that perfect with my colors. Thank you so much for sharing your work and insight.

 

Terry

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