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Another "my first show" thread (sorry)


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#21 vervain

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:06 AM

Definitely drop the funky tent as soon as you can afford to . might not be able to afford NOT to. It will make you look cheezy, not a good sales approach. unless it is a funky market where you are, would have to visit before to know that.

How your booth looks is everything to getting people to look at your work. The work shoud be what they see, not the tent, or decorations.

I had good luck at outside shows with putting large, flat baskets of small things on the ground at the front corners of my booth. People pasing by would look in , see something that made them want to look through the basket, find a low priced piece that was easy to like and buy. To make the purchase, they would need to come into the booth and then see more that they wanted.
Baskets are a good way to group similar things and keep the shelves from being cluttered. Anything that keeps the booth from looking like a second hand pottery store. Pull colors together, use multiple plate stands, stack sames up,ect.
Carefull planning will boost your sales, if the work is good and the prices right .


Good luck.


Yeah, the tent makes me crazy, and it WAS going to be the first thing I bought with my show earnings, but then the kiln gods said $%*& you! And my kiln died. So now all my fundraising is going toward that. :wacko:src="http://ceramicartsda...ult/wacko.gif">

I really like the idea that they have to come in (forced browsing!) to pay, but heres a question for everyone-- So, there isn't any electricity, and since I can't afford a non cow-print tent, obviously a generator and lights are out of my price range. So how to I utilize my booth space so that people are encouraged to come in and look around, but so that everything can still be seen? Or is there no good solution to that? It's not dark under the awning, but it still doesnt show off the glazes very well. I hate to ditch a tent altogether because I feel like I'll either bake in the sun or guarantee that I get poured on...

#22 clay lover

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 11:20 AM

Having no tent can result in the ware being too hot to touch, sales will go out the window when that happens.

Try off white table draping, from Lowe's, painters drop cloths in all sizes, cheap. Get big enough to go to the ground on 3 sides, then do hospital like corners, pinned in to keep from having folds on the ground at the ends. Gives you a place to hide junk out of site.

A white back drop behind your work can help, keeps the background from stealing the show, and can be as simple as sheers from the dollar store hung neatly from the shelf backs.
Displays at different height on a shelf help. If you have 6 mugs, say, cut cubes from 4x4s and paint them white, put the 2 back mugs up on the cubes. I have a box of assorted 4x4 and 2x4 pieces for that purpose. Lots of simple light colored risers is good. 2x4x8 with strip of 1x2 screwed into each end under it for legs makes a good one 4x4 slicesd into different heights makes ramp effect.. endless possibilities, cheap. Manyt big box lumber store will cut for you for a small fee if you buy the wood from them. Get dressed pine for a better finish, sand edges to soften.

#23 Stephen

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:53 AM


Definitely drop the funky tent as soon as you can afford to . might not be able to afford NOT to. It will make you look cheezy, not a good sales approach. unless it is a funky market where you are, would have to visit before to know that.

How your booth looks is everything to getting people to look at your work. The work shoud be what they see, not the tent, or decorations.

I had good luck at outside shows with putting large, flat baskets of small things on the ground at the front corners of my booth. People pasing by would look in , see something that made them want to look through the basket, find a low priced piece that was easy to like and buy. To make the purchase, they would need to come into the booth and then see more that they wanted.
Baskets are a good way to group similar things and keep the shelves from being cluttered. Anything that keeps the booth from looking like a second hand pottery store. Pull colors together, use multiple plate stands, stack sames up,ect.
Carefull planning will boost your sales, if the work is good and the prices right .


Good luck.


Yeah, the tent makes me crazy, and it WAS going to be the first thing I bought with my show earnings, but then the kiln gods said $%*& you! And my kiln died. So now all my fundraising is going toward that. :wacko:src="http://ceramicartsda...ult/wacko.gif">

I really like the idea that they have to come in (forced browsing!) to pay, but heres a question for everyone-- So, there isn't any electricity, and since I can't afford a non cow-print tent, obviously a generator and lights are out of my price range. So how to I utilize my booth space so that people are encouraged to come in and look around, but so that everything can still be seen? Or is there no good solution to that? It's not dark under the awning, but it still doesnt show off the glazes very well. I hate to ditch a tent altogether because I feel like I'll either bake in the sun or guarantee that I get poured on...


Not sure if its in an archive post on CAD but I have seen it on another forum and apparently many folks use RV or marine batteries with an inverter to run some lightweight lights and other things. I know I was able to get about 3 days of lights and such in my RV off one small fully charged battery and they make larger ones that get more. A 12v charger, small 12v RV or marine battery and 2-4 plug inverter should run you I would think in the under $200 range new, at least you could have when I was buying this stuff for my RV, but that was over 10 years ago.

The inverter supplies the plug ins and is based on amps needed so you need to know what your going to run on it and the total amps needed before you buy that and of course the more you need the more its going to cost. Try to match that back against the size battery to determine its size as well. If you look around you might be able to score these items used and put a lightweight one together on the cheap.

Apparently there are also some small battery lights that get used too, so you might search on that as well.

Good luck!

#24 Denice

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:28 PM

This fall or the 4th of July should be a good time to get a tent on sale, I just looked at one at a sports store for 50.00 regular price 130.00. It was a nice instant set up type, 10'x12' but it was to big for what we were needing. Denice

#25 DMCosta

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 08:52 PM

I use ETSY as a base for my pricing. I don't always follow it completely, but it gives me a base of what people are willing to pay for an item. 



#26 oldlady

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 09:29 PM

vervain, did you ever get your tent replaced?


"putting you down does not raise me up."




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