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Building a tandoor - what type of clay to use and...


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#21 Babs

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 12:20 AM

When building and rendering the inside of a chimney, and the render sloughed off after a few feet high, the advice of an old builder was to get a horse to dump in it! So perhaps it has adhesive powers!



#22 Biglou13

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 05:59 AM

I am not from US so this cone business needs some calculations. As I understand it, cone 06 can be anything between 969-1023 °C and 02-01 can be anything between 1078-1178 °C depends what cones are used and so on. You guy do not make it easy smile.gif
BTW, cones are meaningless over here. Not a single pottery shop sells "cones" (they actually sell very few useful things) and I have not met anyone who actually uses cones in electric kiln. Honestly.
I'll just get some local low fire groggy clay and use what ever temperature is recommended on the bag.
Cheers

Where are you Mart? No Cones??? can't imagine relying on temp. alone!

Quick analogy for cones........ Let's say your cooking a prime rib the onen reaches 350 f degrees. Do you shut off the oven when temp reaches 350f?
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#23 Benzine

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:11 AM

That is a good analogy, because one of the best ways I've found to make prime rib, is to get up to a high temp, for a short while, then turn the oven off, allowing the residual heat do most the cooking.
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#24 Babs

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 11:21 PM

No Benzine, you've blown the analogy out of the h2o!! :o

Big Lou's point was that no way would the prime rib be ok even though the temp was reached, was the oven a fan forced?? Commercial there in a minute?? or my woodfired oven and depending on the wood, takes different times to reach the said temp. and then hold it there according to the book....

I think :blink:

I'd have a peep, check the colour, check how long, check the meat therm for the inside of the temp of the beast, then give it to the dog.....and eat the vegs.



#25 Benzine

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:46 AM

Babs, I know, Lou was referring to heat work.  But he mentioned prime rib, and I got distracted....mmmm


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#26 Babs

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 08:09 PM

Must be nearly lunch time! Distracted? Easily done!

Meant to be doing business bookwork or throwing a soup bowl order so..........



#27 indigav

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 05:10 PM

@Oldlady

Thank you for an easy to understand and kindly worded explanation. Much appreciated.

 

@Tyler Miller

That's a great help. Thank you

 

I've added a link for a youtube clip. It's a little jerky and the speakers are not in English though the text is. This isn't exactly what I'm hoping for, but at least it shows something of the process in both the clay mix and the firing. I'd really want to place a pot inside a brick structure, fill the cavity space with vermiculite and cap it so only the opening to the tandoor oven space was available. Anyway, please have a look and hats off to the guys that did this.

 

 

I think I'd be able to get the ingredients together to make the clay for a tandoor, but as Tyler points out, I've no idea how to fire it.

I do wonder how all the tandoors in use across these really rural villages are actually fired though.  I'm pretty sure they wouldn't have a friendly (or expensive) pottery around the corner with a big kiln to fire it for them. There must be a way and something we're missing here. Or perhaps they don't fire it after all, like with cob ovens.

 

Thanks to all that have helped here.



#28 perkolator

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 06:11 PM



Or perhaps they don't fire it after all, like with cob ovens.

.

I'm pretty sure they don't traditionally  "fire" them like ceramics.  They just get dried out really well and then "cured" and slowly heated from within the first few times.  Many different ways to cure a tandoor, but it's similar process to seasoning a cast iron skillet.  I believe the go-to is molasses to cure the interior.

 

if you wanted to fire one, you could always build it to just fit inside your kiln like this guy:

26730d1314432972-portable-tandoor-oven-b






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