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"Artist in residence" fee


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#1 Jo-Ann

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:00 PM

Anyone know what that means?

For the past two year I have been very happy to be able to volunteered my time and helped teach the wheel and clay portion of the ciriculum at our local high school. Always I have been offered payment for my time but I turned it down as I am truly glad to share my knowledge nor have I ever really "needed" money. Very recently circumstances have changed and I no longer have the employment I used to have and am now in need of some income. I asked if payment was still an option and was told yes but was asked if I wanted "an hourly wage type payment or an "artist in residence" fee" I don't know how to answer this question, partly cause I have never charged befor, mostly cause I have no idea what an " artist in residence" fee actually is.

Can someone please help . . . And maybe also offer some guidance on how I should respond and how much.

Thank you bunches!
:D

#2 justanassembler

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:20 PM

Anyone know what that means?

For the past two year I have been very happy to be able to volunteered my time and helped teach the wheel and clay portion of the ciriculum at our local high school. Always I have been offered payment for my time but I turned it down as I am truly glad to share my knowledge nor have I ever really "needed" money. Very recently circumstances have changed and I no longer have the employment I used to have and am now in need of some income. I asked if payment was still an option and was told yes but was asked if I wanted "an hourly wage type payment or an "artist in residence" fee" I don't know how to answer this question, partly cause I have never charged befor, mostly cause I have no idea what an " artist in residence" fee actually is.

Can someone please help . . . And maybe also offer some guidance on how I should respond and how much.

Thank you bunches!
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I would need more information to even begin figuring out a fee--how much time are you actually putting in? When I teach leisure classes through a local university there are a maximum of ten students in my class, there are six 2.5 hour sessions, and I am paid with a contract sum that comes out to be around 26.00/hr. I consider this fair, however I don't have to fire student work, show up outside of class, mix glazes, or do really any studio maintenance--this is all handled by permanent employees of the program. If my duties went beyond the ~15 hours I am required, and entailed me doing more outside of these class periods, I'd want to make sure I was being reimbursed for it. I guess what I am saying is that in considering a fee, you really need to first sit down and hash out all of the work that goes into doing whatever it is that you'll be doing. Don't give away your labor, make sure you're accounting for things like prep time, firing work, mixing glazes, wear and tear if you're firing in your own kiln and that sort of thing. Then work out how many hours all of this is likely going to take, and then apply what you consider a fair hourly wage. Do the math, see if it comes out looking reasonable for you and the school--if it does--great, if not, go back and adjust your numbers.

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:49 PM

Hourly.....if the hours are actually tracked fairly (can be an issue in the arts ..... see what the recent Penland mess devolved into)...... pays you for all of the time you put in.

"Artist-inResidence Fee" is like a salary....... one fixed amount no mattter WHAT the work ends up being. This can be abused by the employer easily.....but feels more "professional".

A formal salary is generally not legal unless your prime responsibiluity is the managing of other employees. A "Residence Fee" is maybe a way they use to try to get "around" this.

It is also possible that the hourly rate makes you an employee of the business.... whereas the "Residence Fee" makes you an independent contractor. BIG differenece in taxation and legal liability for the later as well as no employee Workman's Comp coverage.

Whatever you decide to do.... get a contract in writing for whatever you decide.

best,

................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#4 Jo-Ann

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 05:56 PM

Oh wow thank you for the information, I honestly didn't realize there was so much to it.

How it has worked for the past two years may be different how it works now as I only had a few hours I could miss from my previous work. Being I am no longer employed my time is unlimited. I truly believe this art teacher respects and values my time and work (she has said so many times and has always been so grateful) she is an artist herself so I think she can relate. Is it advisable to allow the art teacher decide how to pay me and negotiate from there?

Justanassembler
Going by how it has worked in the past and what you described, it sounds exactly the same kind of work. (no studio maintaince) Out of the class of 20 I take about half at a time and work on the wheels with them in shift, usually I am there for four to five hours at a time and can have as many as three short classes in a day. The prep work is minimal as everything is there and ready for me and the lesson is the same introductory to the wheel, a demo and rest of the my time there is guidance to achieve their assignment, usually I am there two weeks. This time may be a little different as I have returning students and plan to give a refresher and build on what I taught them last year.

Thank you for your time and help.

#5 Brian Reed

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:11 PM

This sounds very similar to something that I was offered several years ago. I was volunteering at the Boys soccer coach at a public high school. I just helped the head coach and it was fun. I did it two years, and then on the third year the coach offered me the official assistant coach job and was in charge of the JV squad. I was offered a coaching fee or hourly, but because I was employed and anything was fine with me I opted for the fee, mainly because it is less money and I did not want to take money away from the athletic department. I was not really aware that the fee was paid in one lump sum and paid at the end of the school year. Like it said I did not care, but something you should verify.
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Northwest Clay Club

#6 TJR

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 07:39 PM

Jo-Ann;
As John and others have said, there are two ways to go. The hourly rate-which would be around $25.00-$26.00. Don't forget to charge for your set up and clean up time.
The other route is the flat fee for service-as in doing a workshop. The rate in Canada was $300.00 a day. It is now $500.00 a day. I know this as I was offered a job teaching a one day class of portraiture for $500.00 bucks, last week. Do not undersell yourself.
Remember, as a sub contractor, they will not be paying you any benefits like holiday pay or unemployment insurance. That is why the rate sounds so good.Don't under sell yourself.
TJR.

#7 Jo-Ann

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 04:07 AM

Thank you TJR, I didn't think it would be near that much. That money would be so helpful to my family right now and I do feel my time and work is worth it but my worry is if I charge too much the invitation will be withdrawn and I'll not only lose out on the enjoyment I get from teaching these kids but lose out on what ever money the board can give me . . . I'm not sure how it works in public schools but there has to be a budget they have to stck to?




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